Jim Yong Kim’s Mixed Messages to the World Bank and the World

World Bank president Jim Kim is an ex-leftist who claims that in the mid-1990s he wanted to shut down the Bank. At the time, it was an entirely valid, realistic goal of the 50 Years is Enough! Campaign and especially the World Bank Bonds Boycott. Kim’s co-edited Dying for Growth (2000) book-length analysis of the Bank’s attacks on Global-South public health offered very useful ammunition. However, not only did Kim subsequently make an ideological U-turn, as we see below, but more importantly, among the casualties of the 9/11 attacks were many such movement-building efforts aimed at a common international enemy. The global justice scene faded quickly as a result of new divisions between social activists and U.S. labor patriots, the shift by internationalists into anti-war mobilizing, and the ascendance of NGO-led World Social Forum talk-shopping. More

Joe Biden, Crime Fighter from Hell

I just listened to Joe Biden’s seventeen-and-a-half minute 2003 eulogy for his political friend Strom Thurmond, the former Dixiecrat segregationist from South Carolina who became a Republican in 1964. It’s clear Biden liked the man, who he worked closely with to pass crime bills in the early 1980s. As Thurmond’s replacement as chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Biden went on to push the now-controversial bill he proudly touts as “the 1994 Biden Crime Bill.” More

Brief History Notes on Mexican Immigration to the U.S.

The historical ties of Mexican immigrants to the U.S., specifically the Southwest, distinguishes people of Mexican origin from other immigrant groups, especially those from Europe. While Mexican immigrants continue to be demonized and characterized as “criminals,” “drug dealers,” “rapists,” “illegal aliens” and “invaders” by American leaders and millions of white citizens, they have essentially become “foreigners in their own land.” More

This Week on CounterPunch Radio
Yanis Varoufakis

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  • GUEST: Yanis Varoufakis
  • TOPICS: The state of global affairs.

Exclusively in the New Print Issue of CounterPunch

The New NAFTA

In this Issue: The New NAFTA, Worse Than the Old? Laura Carlsen and Pete Dolack dig through the fine print of Trump’s big deal. In Yemen, No One Can Hear You Scream by Jeffrey St. Clair, The Venezuela Fixation by WT Whitney, The Political Economy of Homelessness in the US and the UK by Kenneth Surin, Fidel, Two Years Later by Susan Babbitt, Life Without a Boss by Stan de Spiegelaere, A Big Labor Fight in Iowa by Cinda Cooper, NFL Paper Lions and Sunshine Patriots by Matthew Stevenson, Trump’s Agenda of Destruction by Ruth Fowler, Following the Static by Chris Floyd, and Our Daily Bread by Lee Ballinger

Moving Forward – Halfway to Hell: Joshua Frank on The Big Heat

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