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Humanism – Helping People

Long ago, when I was a congressional press secretary, Jennings Randolph was a wise senator from West Virginia. On his Washington desk, he kept a motto I never forgot:

“The most important lesson you can learn is that other people are as real behind their eyes as you are behind yours.”

That nugget of insight has deep implications, asserting that nearly everyone in the world – all seven billion-plus of them – more or less share the same human feelings, fears, wants, hopes, questions, frustrations, pleasures and the like.

This, to me, is the heart of humanism: recognizing the worth of everyone, and striving to make life as good as possible for the whole populace.

Humanism means helping people, and secular humanism means doing it without supernatural religion.

It began as long ago in ancient Greece, when some thinkers advocated humanitas, a helpful spirit toward all. During the Renaissance, a few scholar-priests began caring more for people than for the church, so they became religious humanists. Then came the Enlightenment, when rebel thinkers challenged the supremacy of kings and holy men. They laid the groundwork for modern democracy, which is rooted in humanism.

Various manifestos have been written to crystallize the need for intelligent people to support human betterment. In 1933, the first Humanist Manifesto was signed by three dozen philosophers, Unitarians, reformers and scholars, including John Dewey. It called humanism a new “religion” to replace magic-based supernatural faiths.

Secular crusader Paul Kurtz spearheaded other declarations, including Humanist Manifesto II of 1973, which asserted: “No deity will save us; we must save ourselves.” It denounced racism and nuclear weapons, calling for scientific progress, universal birth control, world courts, and the right to choose abortion.

(Dr. Kurtz was my guru. He published my books, named me a senior editor of Free Inquiry magazine, and asked me to sign some of his declarations. He even let me drive his Cadillac to Niagara Falls from his headquarters in a Buffalo suburb.)

Philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre declared that his existentialism was a form of humanism. His famed dictum that people are “condemned to be free” might be interpreted to mean that each person is forced to live isolated inside his or her own skull – behind the eyes – unable to experience the inner minds of surrounding people. However, he mostly meant that people are thrown into the world, alone within themselves, not knowing why they exist, with no god to guide them – yet they are solely responsible for all their actions.

As we act, we can realize the personal validity of others and share common humanity with them. We can work to craft a beneficial civilization that helps everyone.

I remember the slogan of a freethought group: “We are not alone in the universe. We have each other.”

That’s a noble call for cooperation. Although part of me responds: Yes, African Americans have the Ku Klux Klan and Hispanics have President Trump demonizing them as criminals and rapists. But I guess the rest of us must keep striving, regardless.

Secular humanists generally support more human rights, better education, reduction of wars, science advances, better nutrition and health, racial equality and other strides to improve life. Solid progress has been made. In 1900, the average lifespan was 48 years; now it’s nearly 80.

When I was born in 1932, the world had two billion population. Now it’s nearing eight billion, almost quadrupling in a single lifetime. Humanists face the challenge of trying to make life livable for the entire, ballooning, human swarm.

More articles by:

James Haught, syndicated by PeaceVoice, is editor emeritus of West Virginia’s largest newspaper, The Charleston Gazette-Mail.

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