Click amount to donate direct to CounterPunch
  • $25
  • $50
  • $100
  • $500
  • $other
  • use PayPal
HAVE YOUR DONATION DOUBLED!

If you are able to donate $100 or more for our Annual Fund Drive, your donation will be matched by another generous CounterPuncher! These are tough times. Regardless of the political rhetoric bantered about the airwaves, the recession hasn’t ended for most of us. We know that money is tight for many of you. But we also know that tens of thousands of daily readers of CounterPunch depend on us to slice through the smokescreen and tell it like is. Please, donate if you can!

FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

What the President Could Learn from Our Shih-Tzu Eddie

by

Always tell the truth. Eddie practices unflinching honesty. He lets you know exactly what he is feeling. When he likes some human or another dog, he wags his tail. When depressed or sad about something, he bends his head and tail downward. When the people around him are happy, he smiles. His eyes glisten and open wide.  When happy and off-leash,  he runs full steam in large loops around the yard.  But if he has reason to distrust some another being, he barks.

Here is Eddie’s advice—to dogs, humans, and even to politicians. Be open to what each being has  to offer.  You will find that most humans, dogs, and other beings are open to friendship. If you show them good will and warmth, many if not most will respond in kind.

Be nice to others with no expectation of reward. Do not demand something in exchange for whatever you offer or bring to the table.

Respect each gender. Treat females and males equally and respect their personal space.

Still, you must be on guard. Of  course there are mean persons and mean dogs. If you have reason to fear or distrust them, keep a safe distance. Observe them carefully however. Your first impressions can be wrong.

Yes, some persons and dogs see everything as a contest. They act as though everything is winner-take-all—as though only one could get a bone or other valued object. Better to act as though sharing is better than grabbing. Less fighting and more smiles.

Keep a healthy balance between sitting, walking, running. If you have been sedentary for some time, yawn and stretch fully. Do what yogis call upward looking dog and downward looking dog. Roll on your back and shake your limbs.

Loyalty: Be loyal to your master. In your case,   the people you have been elected to serve—not whoever gives  you a treat. .

Eat to live. Don’t live to eat. Try to eat and drink (lots of water!) at about the same time each day. Don’t have a big meal just before sleep time. Don’t insist on two scoops of ice cream on top of chocolate pie.  Maybe skip that kind of desert altogether.

Be tidy and clean. If you get messy, brush your hair, clean your teeth, and wash everywhere—or get somebody to do this for you.  If you have lots of possessions, push them into neat piles and leave space to play and think.

Don’t stick out your tongue, drool, or pout.  If you feel bad, keep it to yourself or share your problem with a friend—not with the whole world.

Try to be with beings you like and trust. Try to make others happy. If you can do a trick that amuses and the setting is right, smile and perform the trick.  But don’t just be a show off.

Watch your manners. Be a warm host and a courteous visitor or guest.  Don’t bully others or try to dominate a social event. Like a wise grownup or elder, hold back most of the time and  let others do their thing.

Keep regular hours. We all need sleep to be our best. Sleep deprived, we become sluggish and cranky. Stay away from electronic devices. TV programs and telephones get in the way of clear thinking and effective action. If you stay up late one night, next day go to a quiet place and take a nap.

Be content with you as you are.  Don’t depend on praise to find satisfaction. Win or lose, virtue is its own reward.

Some people may give you the idea that you are the center of the cosmos. But you are not. We are all here for a short time. Do what you can to make the most of it. Do what you can to fulfill your own potential and make the world a better place.

Walter Clemens lives near Boston with his family and their rescued dog Eddie. Clemens  is professor emeritus of political science, Boston University.  He examines how to mitigate evil in North Korea and the World: Human Rights, Arms Control, and Strategies for Negotiation (University Press of Kentucky, 2016).

More articles by:

Walter Clemens is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Boston University and Associate, Harvard University Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies. He wrote Complexity Science and World Affairs (SUNY Press, 2013).

October 24, 2017
Bertrand Renouvin
Setback for the French Germanophiles
October 23, 2017
Jack Heyman
Puerto Rico and the Jones Act Conundrum
Howard Lisnoff
Will the Military Throw the Book at Bowe Bergdahl?
Robert Hunziker
Hidden Danger of Ecological Collapse
Sheldon Richman
Dying for the Empire is Not Heroic
Dimitris Konstantakopoulos
Careening Toward Nuclear War: the Political Paralysis of Europe, Russia and China
Jeff Berg
Looking for a Glass of Water and a Place to Shit
Yoav Litvin
The Art of Trolling – an Analysis of a Toxic Trend
Sarah Browning
There’s No Defense for Founding Fathers Who Practiced Slavery
Chuck Collins
An Independent Thinker’s Guide to the Tax Debate
Elliott Adams
Congress Can Stop War with North Korea
Jesselyn Radack – Kathleen McClellan
Insider Threat Program Training and Trump’s War on Leaks
Rosemary Mason - Colin Todhunter
The Global Food and Health Crisis: Monsanto’s Science is Bogus
Thomas Knapp
Hillary Clinton: Cold Creepiness with a Side of Corruption
Mel Gurtov
The Tragedy of American Foreign Policy
Weekend Edition
October 20, 2017
Friday - Sunday
John Pilger
Clinton, Assange and the War on Truth
Michael Hudson
Socialism, Land and Banking: 2017 Compared to 1917
Jeffrey St. Clair
A Day in the Life of CounterPunch
Paul Street
The Not-So-Radical “Socialist” From Vermont
Jason Hirthler
Censorship in the Digital Age
Jonathan Cook
Harvey Weinstein and the Politics of Hollywood
Andrew Levine
Diagnosing the Donald
Michelle Renee Matisons
Relocated Puerto Rican Families are Florida’s Latest Class War Targets
Richard Moser
Goldman Sachs vs. Goldman Sachs?
David Rosen
Male Sexual Violence: As American as Cherry Pie
Mike Whitney
John Brennan’s Police State USA
Robert Hunziker
Mr. Toxicity Zaps America
Peter Gelderloos
Catalan Independence and the Crisis of Democracy
Robert Fantina
Fatah, Hamas, Israel and the United States
Edward Curtin
Organized Chaos and Confusion as Political Control
Patrick Cockburn
The Transformation of Iraq: Kurds Have Lost 40% of Their Territory
CJ Hopkins
Tomorrow Belongs to the Corporatocracy
Bill Quigley
The Blueprint for the Most Radical City on the Planet
Brian Cloughley
Chinese Dreams and American Deaths in Africa
John Hultgren
Immigration and the American Political Imagination
Thomas Klikauer
Torturing the Poor, German-Style
Gerry Brown
China’s Elderly Statesmen
Pepe Escobar
Kirkuk Redux Was a Bloodless Offensive, Here’s Why
Jill Richardson
The Mundaneness of Sexual Violence
Caoimhghin Ó Croidheáin
The Choreography of Human Dignity: Blade Runner 2049 and World War Z
Missy Comley Beattie
Bitch, Get Out!!
Andre Vltchek
The Greatest Indonesian Painter and “Praying to the Pig”
Ralph Nader
Why is Nobelist Economist Richard Thaler so Jovial?
Ricardo Vaz
Venezuela Regional Elections: Chavismo in Triumph, Opposition in Disarray and Media in Denial
Kevin Zeese - Margaret Flowers
NAFTA Talks Falter, Time To Increase Pressure
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail