FacebookTwitterRedditEmail

The Senator Visits Río Piedras

According to the Puerto Rico Police Superintendent, the end result of the Senate Majority Leader’s visit to an ex-governor’s foundation in Río Piedras—just a two-minute walk from the University of Puerto Rico student strike—was 16 wounded officers.

According to the senator, the purpose of his visit was to listen to the testimonies of three “ladies” who have benefitted from the foundation’s programming.

The ex-governor’s interest in his visit was a chance for her to lobby for legislative funds in a debt-stricken colony.

To substantiate her allegations, the Superintendent offered no evidence whatsoever of the wounds suffered by her agents.

The senator had announced his visit on his Facebook page, where he had previously threatened the Superintendent with an official Senate inquiry into the Police’s failure to arrest students during a protest staged at the Capitol Building the previous week.

At the protest last week, officers arrested a student for attempting to walk into the lobby of the Capitol Building and charged him assault.

Students interpreted the senator’s visit to Río Piedras as a provocation of sorts.

The end result of his visit, for me, was at least a dozen protesters who were pepper sprayed; two good friends who were hit with batons, many others pushed down or elbowed or threatened with lethal force.

To substantiate my allegations, I would say that student strikers are always right, especially in that moment when it felt like they managed to corral a few riot police officers, shouting “¡policía, fuera!”

By then, the senate majority leader had already fled Río Piedras.

When a senator must flee a place in custom-fitted SUVs, with dozens of riot police officers making way for the vehicles down a narrow street, pushing students, pinning them against parked cars, threatening to use their hand guns or their Tasers just because one of them got close enough to shout “¡Rivera Schatz, fuera!” to their face, I think it’s pretty safe to say that the only thing that remains for said senator to do on behalf of his country is to flee his country and seek refuge in a place where people do not dare confront him and chase him out.

I find it comforting to think that no such place exists; that the senator will have no choice but to flee from places over and over again; that he will always run into bodies surrounding the uniformed bodies that flank his SUVs; that, one day, those uniformed bodies will tire from always having to secure his getaways and will abandon their place in line. And so, the senator’s SUVs will have to go along the escape route unprotected. Then another day will come in which the getaway driver will also tire, and leave, and take the keys with him, leaving the senator alone in the backseat to stare at the crowd that gathers on the other side of the window. And he will not know what to do.

Well, maybe he can post something about the event on Facebook.

More articles by:
bernie-the-sandernistas-cover-344x550
July 15, 2019
David Altheide
The Fear Party
Roger Harris
UN High Commissioner on Human Rights Bachelet’s Gift to the US: Justifying Regime Change in Venezuela
John Feffer
Pyongyang on the Potomac
Vincent Kelley
Jeffrey Epstein and the Collapse of Europe
Robert Fisk
Trump’s Hissy-Fit Over Darroch Will Blow a Chill Wind Across Britain’s Embassies in the Middle East
Binoy Kampmark
Juggling with the Authoritarians: Donald Trump’s Diplomatic Fake Book
Dean Baker
The June Jobs Report and the State of the Economy
Michael Hudson – Bonnie Faulkner
De-Dollarizing the American Financial Empire
Kathy Kelly
Remnants of War
B. Nimri Aziz
The Power of Our Human Voice: From Marconi to Woods Hole
Elliot Sperber
Christianity Demands a Corpse 
Weekend Edition
July 12, 2019
Friday - Sunday
Paul Street
Skull of Death: Mass Media, Inauthentic Opposition, and Eco-Existential Reality in a Pre-Fascist Age of Appeasement
T.J. Coles
“Strategic Extremism”: How Republicans and Establishment Democrats Use Identity Politics to Divide and Rule
Rob Urie
Toward an Eco-Socialist Revolution
Gregory Elich
How Real is the Trump Administration’s New Flexibility with North Korea?
Jason Hirthler
The Journalists Do The Shouting
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Pâté Politics in the Time of Trump and Pelosi
Andrew Levine
The Electoral Circus as the End of Its Initial Phase Looms
David Swanson
Earth Over the Brink
Ron Jacobs
Presidential Papers
Robert Hunziker
The Flawed Food Dependency
Dave Lindorff
Defeating the Trump Administration’s Racist, Republican-Rescuing Census Corruption
Martha Rosenberg
Pathologizing Kids, Pharma Style
Kathleen Wallace
Too Horrible to Understand, Too Horrible to Ignore
Ralph Nader
An Unsurpassable Sterling Record of Stamina!
Paul Tritschler
Restricted View: the British Legacy of Eugenics
John Feffer
Trump’s Bluster Diplomacy
Thomas Knapp
Did Jeffrey Epstein “Belong to Intelligence?”
Nicholas Buccola
Colin Kaepernick, Ted Cruz, Frederick Douglass and the Meaning of Patriotism
P. Sainath
It’s Raining Sand in Rayalaseema
Charles Davis
Donald Trump’s Fake Isolationism
Michael Lukas
Delisting Wolves and the Impending Wolf Slaughter
Evaggelos Vallianatos
Shaking Off Capitalism for Ecological Civilization
Julian Vigo
North America’s Opioid Addiction Problem and the Institutional Machinery Keeping It Alive
Russell Rickford
Lights of Liberty Vigil Remarks
Stansfield Smith
Bernie Sanders’ Present Fight against Corporate Rule vs. the Bernie of 1989
Steve Early
A Plant Closing War, Viewed From Inside
Jill Richardson
The Good News About Trump’s Very Bad Environmental Speech
John Kendall Hawkins
The Language of Languishing: One Kurd’s Journey Into Mythopoesis
Monika Zgustova
Russia and the Manipulation of the Past
Binoy Kampmark
Out of Kilter: National Security and Press Freedoms in Australia
Robert P. Alvarez
Return of the Poll Tax
David Macaray
A Hideous Ending
David Barsamian
The Slide to War with Iran: An Interview with Nader Hashemi
Graham Peebles
Breaking the Spiral of Hate and Intolerance
FacebookTwitterRedditEmail