Nazi Heritage: the Strange Saga of Chrystia Freeland’s Ukrainian Grandfather

The corporate media has left many questions unanswered about recent news that Canadian Foreign Minister, Chrystia Freeland’s grandfather was editor of the Krakivski Visti, referred to as a Nazi “collaborationist newspaper” by the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust.

The most important question is how Freeland’s Grandfather Mykhailo Khomiak, gained admission to the United States and Canada after the war?  The second, is why he was never prosecuted like many other Nazi collaborators for his crimes?

According to David Matas, senior legal counsel for B’nai Brith, “Chomiak died in 1984.  He has been dead for more than 30 years.  The Deschenes and Government files on him, if there are any, should be made public”.

A second set of questions are raised by her association to this figure, with whose Ukrainian nationalist dreams she openly identifies, “That dream persisted into the next generation, and in some cases [namely hers] the generation after that”.

Of most concern to leftists, is her activist anti-communism.  For example, on January 28th, 2015 Freeland was the only MP from the Liberal Party to join with Conservative MP’s including Jason Kenney in a ceremony celebrating a gift from the Government of Latvia to the Memorial for the Victims of Communism project.

In her book entitled Plutocrats, moreover, she offers a shocking defense of “global capitalism”.  Not only is it strange that she chose this term for her title given its history as code word for “Jew” in the speeches of Hitler and Goebbels, but statements like the following in the book are a warning signal to all leftists about her agenda:

“America really does need many of its plutocrats. We benefit from the goods they produce and the jobs they create. And even if a growing portion of those jobs are overseas, it is better to be the home of these innovators—native and immigrant alike—than not. In today’s hypercompetitive global environment, we need a creative, dynamic super-elite more than ever.”

Freeland’s stance as an “activist Ukrainian-Canadian”, to use her own words, goes a long way to explain her anti-communism and her collaboration with the global capitalist elite as an editor, like her Grandfather, for the Globe and Mail and the Financial Times.

Ukrainian nationalism is in no small part a reaction to the difficult early period in Soviet history marked by Civil War and the Holodomor (though the causes of the latter event are still debated by historians).  However, her Grandfather’s education and white-collar career, suggest that her family’s nationalist aspirations were of a different order than that of the peasants in the field.

In her post as Minister of Trade, Freeland’s success in pushing through the EU-Canada free trade deal (CETA), which protects investor rights at the expense of those of labour and the environment, was a major victory for her capitalist agenda.

Now as Minister of Foreign Affairs she has turned her attention to a major military build-up in the Ukraine and Latvia designed to secure the economic benefits of CETA, and the Canada-Ukraine Free Trade Agreement (CUFTA) which she also pushed through Parliament. No wonder she is banned from travel in Russia.

They say the apple does not fall far from the tree.






















More articles by:
March 22, 2018
Conn Hallinan
Italy, Germany and the EU’s Future
David Rosen
The Further Adventures of the President and the Porn Star
Gary Leupp
Trump, the Crown Prince and the Whole Ugly Big Picture
The Hudson Report
Modern-Day Debtors’ Prisons and Debt in Antiquity
Steve Martinot
The Properties of Property
Binoy Kampmark
Facebook, Cambridge Analytica and Surveillance Capitalism
Jeff Berg
Russian to Judgment
Gregory Barrett
POSSESSED! Europe’s American Demon Must Be Exorcised
Robby Sherwin
What Do We Do About Facebook?
Trump Spokesperson Commemorates Invading Iraq by Claiming U.S. Doesn’t Dictate to Other Countries; State Dept. Defends Invasion
Rob Okun
Students: Time is Ripe to Add Gender to Gun Debate
Michael Barker
Tory Profiteering in Russia and Putin’s Debt of Gratitude
March 21, 2018
Paul Street
Time is Running Out: Who Will Protect Our Wrecked Democracy from the American Oligarchy?
Mel Goodman
The Great Myth of the So-Called “Adults in the Room”
Chris Floyd
Stumbling Blocks: Tim Kaine and the Bipartisan Abettors of Atrocity
Eric Draitser
The Political Repression of the Radical Left in Crimea
Patrick Cockburn
Erdogan Threatens Wider War Against the Kurds
John Steppling
It is Us
Thomas Knapp
Death Penalty for Drug Dealers? Be Careful What You Wish for, President Trump
Manuel García, Jr.
Why I Am a Leftist (Vietnam War)
Isaac Christiansen
A Left Critique of Russiagate
Howard Gregory
The Unemployment Rate is an Inadequate Reporter of U.S. Economic Health
Ramzy Baroud
Who Wants to Kill Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah?
Roy Morrison
Trouble Ahead: The Trump Administration at Home and Abroad
Roger Hayden
Too Many Dead Grizzlies
George Wuerthner
The Lessons of the Battle to Save the Ancient Forests of French Pete
Binoy Kampmark
Fictional Free Trade and Permanent Protectionism: Donald Trump’s Economic Orthodoxy
Rivera Sun
Think Outside the Protest Box
March 20, 2018
Jonathan Cook
US Smooths Israel’s Path to Annexing West Bank
Jeffrey St. Clair
How They Sold the Iraq War
Chris Busby
Cancer, George Monbiot and Nuclear Weapons Test Fallout
Nick Alexandrov
Washington’s Invasion of Iraq at Fifteen
David Mattson
Wyoming Plans to Slaughter Grizzly Bears
Paul Edwards
My Lai and the Bad Apples Scam
Julian Vigo
The Privatization of Water and the Impoverishment of the Global South
Mir Alikhan
Trump and Pompeo on Three Issues: Paris, Iran and North Korea
Seiji Yamada
Preparing For Nuclear War is Useless
Gary Leupp
Brennan, Venality and Turpitude
Martha Rosenberg
Why There’s a Boycott of Ben & Jerry’s on World Water Day, March 22
John Pilger
Skripal Case: a Carefully-Constructed Drama?
March 19, 2018
Henry Heller
The Moment of Trump
John Davis
Pristine Buildings, Tarnished Architect
Uri Avnery
The Fake Enemy
Patrick Cockburn
The Fall of Afrin and the Next Phase of the Syrian War
Nick Pemberton
The Democrats Can’t Save Us