• Monthly
  • $25
  • $50
  • $100
  • $other
  • use PayPal

ONE WEEK TO DOUBLE YOUR DONATION!

A generous CounterPuncher has offered a $25,000 matching grant. So for this week only, whatever you can donate will be doubled up to $25,000! If you have the means, please donate! If you already have done so, thank you for your support. All contributions are tax-deductible.
FacebookTwitterRedditEmail

Will Trump’s Racism Rescue the Democrats?

As a scholar and proud Latino of Mexican descent, I’m appalled, but not surprised, by Donald Trump’s racist comments against Mexican immigrants. In announcing his bid for the White House, as has been widely reported, Trump didn’t mince his words when he vulgarly uttered: “When Mexico sends its people, they’re not sending their best. They’re not sending you… They’re sending people that have lots of problems, and they’re bringing those problems with us. They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.”

I will not try to counter these baseless comments. To do so, I will fall into the trap that Trump sets up, like provocateur extraordinaire and racist commentator Ann Coulter, to purposely make outrageous comments for free publicity to promote his self-interest. It’s not about logic or reason. It’s about branding and self-marketing.

While one can easily view Trump’s or Coulter’s xenophobic comments as simple-minded or idiotic, let’s not forget that we’re not talking about ignorant individuals. They both have Ivy League degrees. Trump and Coulter are very intelligent. By dismissing them as dimwits, critics ignore one simple point: When they make
huertaridiculous or bombastic comments, Trump and Coulter know exactly what they’re doing. They’re grabbing national headlines. Free of cost.

By reaching millions of Americans via online sources, media outlets and televised shows, Trump and Coulter, similar to the Kardashians, posses an uncanny ability to monopolize what Americans talk and think about. They say and do things that some Americans would only utter in the privacy of their homes. Also, many Americans pay attention to them for one simple fact: the shock value.

Since he’s entered the crowded Republican nomination race for president, Trump has become a major liability for his own party. By making racist comments and feuding with the influential Spanish-language network Univision, among other Latino groups and individuals, Trump has taken the spotlight from his fellow Republican candidates. Instead of attacking presidential candidate Hilary Clinton on her liberal policies, Republican candidates, including Jeb Bush, Chris Christy, Marco Rubio, Ted Cruz, Carly Fiorina, Scott Walker and Rand Paul, along with the growing list of Republicans, have been relegated to spectators of “The Trump Show.” Given that a major television network like NBC recently joined Univision in pulling the plug on Trump’s Miss Universe pageant, it’s only a matter of time when Trump feels additional financial consequences from his racist comments, such as loss of business from Macy’s and Serta, along with other companies who have and will cut business ties with Trump.

Politically, Trump’s racist comments will not only tarnish his image among the over 54 million Latinos, the majority being of Mexican descent, but these hurtful words will also continue to hurt the already damaged Republican brand among this country’s largest and fast-growing minority group. This is a lesson that former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney learned the hard way in the last presidential election when asked about his plan for America’s 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the shadows. Romney’s ingenious plan: self-deport.

Apart from Latinos, Republicans will continue to alienate other important voting blocs, like Asians, given that immigration also represents an important issue to the nation’s fastest growing ethic group. Also, given that Republican leaders haven’t adequately condemned Trump’s racist comments, the GOP’s weak response speaks volumes to Latinos. In addition, since Mexico represents a friendly neighbor and huge trading with the U.S., Trump’s derogatory comments towards the Mexican government will only cement “anti-Yankee” or “Ugly-American” sentiments in Mexico and throughout Latin America.

On a popular level, Mexicans quickly responded with their humor and creativity: a Trump piñata!

In the case of the Democrats, if they want to win the White House in 2016, they should not only condemn Trump’s racist comments, especially Hilary Clinton and President Obama, but also hope that Trump secures the Republican nomination. Democrats should also cross their fingers that Trump, should he become the GOP’s nominee, selects Ann Coulter as his vice-president running mate.

More articles by:

Dr. Alvaro Huerta is an assistant professor of urban and regional planning and ethnic and women’s studies at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. He is the author of “Reframing the Latino Immigration Debate: Towards a Humanistic Paradigm,” published by San Diego State University Press (2013).

bernie-the-sandernistas-cover-344x550
Weekend Edition
October 18, 2019
Friday - Sunday
Anthony DiMaggio
Trump as the “Anti-War” President: on Misinformation in American Political Discourse
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Where’s the Beef With Billionaires?
Rob Urie
Capitalism and the Violence of Environmental Decline
Paul Street
Bernie in the Deep Shit: Dismal Dem Debate Reflections
Andrew Levine
What’s So Awful About Foreign Interference?
T.J. Coles
Boris Johnson’s Brexit “Betrayal”: Elect a Clown, Expect a Pie in Your Face
Joseph Natoli
Trump on the March
Ashley Smith
Stop the Normalization of Concentration Camps
Pete Dolack
The Fight to Overturn the Latest Corporate Coup at Pacifica Has Only Begun
Jeremy Kuzmarov
Russophobia at Democratic Party Debate
Chris Gilbert
Forward! A Week of Protest in Catalonia
Daniel Beaumont
Pressing Done Here: Syria, Iraq and “Informed Discussion”
Daniel Warner
Greta the Disturber
M. G. Piety
“Grim Positivism” vs. Truthiness in Biography
John Kendall Hawkins
Journey to the Unknown Interior of (You)
Christopher Fons – Conor McMullen
The Centrism of Elizabeth Warren
Nino Pagliccia
Peace Restored in Ecuador, But is trust?
Rebecca Gordon
Extorting Ukraine is Bad Enough But Trump Has Done Much Worse
Kathleen Wallace
Trump Can’t Survive Where the Bats and Moonlight Laugh
Clark T. Scott
Cross-eyed, Fanged and Horned
Eileen Appelbaum
The PR Campaign to Hide the Real Cause of those Sky-High Surprise Medical Bills
Olivia Alperstein
Nuclear Weapons are an Existential Threat
Colin Todhunter
Asia-Pacific Trade Deal: Trading Away Indian Agriculture?
Sarah Anderson
Where is “Line Worker Barbie”?
Brian Cloughley
Yearning to Breathe Free
Jill Richardson
Why are LGBTQ Rights Even a Debate?
Jesse Jackson
What I Learn While Having Lunch at Cook County Jail
Kathy Kelly
Death, Misery and Bloodshed in Yemen
Maximilian Werner
Leadership Lacking for Wolf Protection
Arshad Khan
The Turkish Gambit
Kollibri terre Sonnenblume
Rare Wildflower vs. Mining Company
Dianne Woodward
Race Against Time (and For Palestinians)
Norman Ball
Wall Street Sees the Light of Domestic Reindustrialization
Ramzy Baroud
The Last Lifeline: The Real Reason Behind Abbas’ Call for Elections
Binoy Kampmark
African Swine Fever Does Its Worst
Nicky Reid
Screwing Over the Kurds: An All-American Pastime
Louis Proyect
“Our Boys”: a Brutally Honest Film About the Consequences of the Occupation
Coco Das
#OUTNOW
Cesar Chelala
Donald Trump vs. William Shakespeare
Ron Jacobs
Calling the Kettle White: Ishmael Reed Unbound
Stephen Cooper
Scientist vs. Cooper: The Interview, Round 3 
Susan Block
How “Hustlers” Hustles Us
Charles R. Larson
Review: Elif Shafak’s “10 Minutes 38 Seconds in This Strange World”
David Yearsley
Sunset Songs
October 17, 2019
Steve Early
The Irishman Cometh: Teamster History Hits the Big Screen (Again)
FacebookTwitterRedditEmail