FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

A Velvet Revolution Turns Bloody? Ten Dead in Toronto

Alek Minassian is of Armenian descent.  His murderous attack using a “white van” on the streets of Toronto took place on the same day that growing street protests in Yerevan, capital of Armenia, forced the long-reigning President and Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan, to resign his post; and the day before commemoration of the Armenian Genocide, still not recognized by the Turkish Government.

This complicates the claim of Prime Minister Trudeau that there is “nothing to suggest that there is a national security element to the situation”. Toronto City Mayor John Tory responded by saying that “we don’t expect such things to happen in Toronto”.  Of course, Hemingway famously mocked the placid politics of Toronto, where he did a short stint as a Toronto Star reporter, dismissing it as a “city of churches”.  But is Toronto, and Canada, really so secluded and blameless in international affairs?

With regard to events in Armenia, in fact, the Canadian government has been a very active supporter of the political protest movement aimed at unseating its socialist government, as it has also been in Venezuela, Ukraine, and Syria. The claim of Canada’s Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland has been that these governments are authoritarian tools of Russian plots against Western democracy, and “free markets”.

The same day that Minassian attacked, Freeland’s office had issued the following statement of support for the “Velvet Revolution” in Armenia:

“Canada recognizes the bravery of Armenians who have exercised their ‎freedom of expression over the past several days, in the face of threats of harsh punishment,” Adam Austen, spokesperson for Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, said in a statement to Radio Canada International. “Their courage is to be applauded.”

It is to be noted here that Sargsyan was a senior member of the Communist Party during the Soviet era, and his government rules with the support of the Armenian Revolutionary Federation (ARF), a democratic socialist party, and received over 55% of the popular vote in the 2017 elections.  His government is perceived as Pro-Russian.

Of course, Nikol Pashinyan, leader of the “Civil Contract” Party is a neo-liberal politician campaigning for greater integration of Armenia with the EU.  He claims that the success of the protests mean that the current government should surrender power and call new elections.

This brings us to the question of whether the events of April 23rdin Toronto may have had a political connection. The timing of events makes it seem implausible that they are a mere coincidence.  The Canadian government has suffered blowback for its international adventures before, not the least of which is the banning of its Foreign Minister, Chrystia Freeland, from travel to Russia precisely in response to her meddling in political events along its borders.

More articles by:
August 20, 2018
Carl Boggs
The Road to Disaster?
James Munson
“Not With a Bomb, But a Whimper” … Then More Bombs.
Jonathan Cook
Corbyn’s Labour Party is Being Made to Fail –By Design
Robert Fisk
A US Trade War With Turkey Over a Pastor? Don’t Believe It
Howard Lisnoff
The Mass Media’s Outrage at Trump: Why the Surprise?
Faisal Khan
A British Muslim’s Perspective on the Burkha Debate
Andrew Kahn
Inhumanity Above the Clouds
Dan Glazebrook
Trump’s New Financial War on the Global South
George Wuerthner
Why the Gallatin Range Deserves Protection
Ted Rall
Is Trump a Brand-New Weird Existential Threat? No.
Sheldon Richman
For the Love of Reason
Susie Day
Why Pundits Scare Me
Dean Baker
Does France’s Economy Need to Be Renewed?
Jeffrey St. Clair
A Mighty Voice for Peace Has Gone Silent: Uri Avnery, 1923-2018
Weekend Edition
August 17, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Daniel Wolff
The Aretha Dialogue
Nick Pemberton
Donald Trump and the Rise of Patriotism 
Joseph Natoli
First Amendment Rights and the Court of Popular Opinion
Andrew Levine
Midterms 2018: What’s There to Hope For?
Robert Hunziker
Hothouse Earth
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Running Out of Fools
Ajamu Baraka
Opposing Bipartisan Warmongering is Defending Human Rights of the Poor and Working Class
Paul Street
Corporate Media: the Enemy of the People
David Macaray
Trump and the Sex Tape
CJ Hopkins
Where Have All the Nazis Gone?
Daniel Falcone
The Future of NATO: an Interview With Richard Falk
Cesar Chelala
The Historic Responsibility of the Catholic Church
Ron Jacobs
The Barbarism of US Immigration Policy
Kenneth Surin
In Shanghai
William Camacaro - Frederick B. Mills
The Military Option Against Venezuela in the “Year of the Americas”
Nancy Kurshan
The Whole World Was Watching: Chicago ’68, Revisited
Robert Fantina
Yemeni and Palestinian Children
Alexandra Isfahani-Hammond
Orcas and Other-Than-Human Grief
Shoshana Fine – Thomas Lindemann
Migrants Deaths: European Democracies and the Right to Not Protect?
Paul Edwards
Totally Irrusianal
Thomas Knapp
Murphy’s Law: Big Tech Must Serve as Censorship Subcontractors
Mark Ashwill
More Demons Unleashed After Fulbright University Vietnam Official Drops Rhetorical Bombshells
Ralph Nader
Going Fundamental Eludes Congressional Progressives
Hans-Armin Ohlmann
My Longest Day: How World War II Ended for My Family
Matthew Funke
The Nordic Countries Aren’t Socialist
Daniel Warner
Tiger Woods, Donald Trump and Crime and Punishment
Dave Lindorff
Mainstream Media Hypocrisy on Display
Jeff Cohen
Democrats Gather in Chicago: Elite Party or Party of the People?
Victor Grossman
Stand Up With New Hope in Germany?
Christopher Brauchli
A Family Affair
Jill Richardson
Profiting From Poison
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail