Click amount to donate direct to CounterPunch
  • $25
  • $50
  • $100
  • $500
  • $other
  • use PayPal
Spring Fund Drive: Keep CounterPunch Afloat
CounterPunch is a lifeboat of sanity in today’s turbulent political seas. Please make a tax-deductible donation and help us continue to fight Trump and his enablers on both sides of the aisle. Every dollar counts!
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Corruption is the Game

DeSmog Blog journalist, Steve Horn, has published a very well done report on Hillary Clinton’s corrupt State Department. His investigation follows Wikileaks and government released documents showing her and her appointees leveraging their positions for personal and corporate gain in abetting the corrupt PRI regime in privatizing the historically nationalized Mexican energy sector. Corporate media, as expected, is largely silent about the revelations. They’ve been silent constantly in regards to Mexico, when not repugnantly cheerleading or spreading xenophobic rhetoric.

This is a disservice to the American public, who deserve to know and act on the corruption of their elected and appointed officials. It is a further disservice to the American public, as they do not learn how the corruption is international, involving transnational oligarchic networks. Such an understanding might lead American workers to see Mexican workers as their kin in a global fight against capital. It also might clue them in to the history of privatization as accumulation through dispossession, the ugly reality of capitalism as expropriator of common wealth. They might realize that corruption is the game.

Mexican officials have had to respond to the allegations as the Mexican population is quite nationalist, and involvement by the Yankees in their affairs will spark outrage. Mexican Energy Secretary, Joaquín Coldwell, has come out publically stating that the energy reform is “a totally Mexican product” and declaring the accusations “absolutely false”. He went on to state that the only examples Mexico used were Norway, Brazil, and Colombia. He also stated that he thinks the e-mail revelations are political, unsubstantiated claims meant to harm Clinton’s campaign. However, Coldwell refuses to release the meeting minutes related to energy reform, which would allow him to corroborate his claims, if that would be possible. Nor, does he deal with any of the substantive material from the evidence provided by Horn from Wikileaks.

For instance, in April 2013 we know that David Goldwyn, Clinton’s first International Energy Coordinate appointee, stated to the House Committee on Foreign Affairs’s Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere that the US, Mexico, and Canada have “a trilateral energy policy dialogue” meant to handle “harmonization of standard and market outlooks.” Further, Goldwyn states that Mexico’s constitutional constraints are an obstacle to US accessing of Mexico’s oil sector multiple times, the constitutional restraints that energy reform removed. Goldwyn is stating that he does interact with the Mexican government on this very topic. So, either Goldwyn or Coldwell is lying about whether or not the US and Mexico have been working on Mexican energy privatization. My bet is on the latter.

Further, I would agree this is political, in the sense of the investment theory of politics. Hillary Clinton has links to Mexican transnational capitalists, such as major Clinton Foundation donor Carlos Slim, the Mexican telecom billionaire. Slim’s Grupo Carso will be competing for exploration and extraction contracts resultant from PEMEX privatization. That is, the oligarchic network is well connected, and multiple parties benefit from the way the system operates. Slim donates to the Clintons because they support a neoliberal worldview, a view they then implement when in power, like being Secretary of State, which enables capitalists like Slim to enrich themselves at the public trough. Nor is this a new gimmick for Slim, who has enriched himself continuously by purchasing public sector goods, such as in the case of Telmex.

These people and organizations are all actively working to further enrich themselves through the dispossession of roughly one third or more of Mexico’s federal budget. Politicians and officials are utilizing their positions of power, positions meant to pursue the public good, to aid corporations to accumulate through dispossession. The corporations do not care about political party as they give to any politician who will pursue their interests. The only goal the corporations had was to access resources they would otherwise be unable to access, especially if it was a matter of democracy. Collusion, conflict of interest, corruption, all on display. It is called capitalism and the game is rigged, internationally so.

More articles by:

Andrew Smolski is a writer and sociologist.

May 22, 2018
Stanley L. Cohen
Broken Dreams and Lost Lives: Israel, Gaza and the Hamas Card
Kathy Kelly
Scourging Yemen
Andrew Levine
November’s “Revolution” Will Not Be Televised
Ted Rall
#MeToo is a Cultural Workaround to a Legal Failure
Gary Leupp
Question for Discussion: Is Russia an Adversary Nation?
Binoy Kampmark
Unsettling the Summits: John Bolton’s Libya Solution
Doug Johnson
As Andrea Horwath Surges, Undecided Voters Threaten to Upend Doug Ford’s Hopes in Canada’s Most Populated Province
Kenneth Surin
Malaysia’s Surprising Election Results
Dana Cook
Canada’s ‘Superwoman’: Margot Kidder
Dean Baker
The Trade Deficit With China: Up Sharply, for Those Who Care
John Feffer
Playing Trump for Peace How the Korean Peninsula Could Become a Bright Spot in a World Gone Mad
Peter Gelderloos
Decades in Prison for Protesting Trump?
Thomas Knapp
Yes, Virginia, There is a Deep State
Andrew Stewart
What the Providence Teachers’ Union Needs for a Win
Jimmy Centeno
Mexico’s First Presidential Debate: All against One
May 21, 2018
Ron Jacobs
Gina Haspell: She’s Certainly Qualified for the Job
Uri Avnery
The Day of Shame
Amitai Ben-Abba
Israel’s New Ideology of Genocide
Patrick Cockburn
Israel is at the Height of Its Power, But the Palestinians are Still There
Frank Stricker
Can We Finally Stop Worrying About Unemployment?
Binoy Kampmark
Royal Wedding Madness
Roy Morrison
Middle East War Clouds Gather
Edward Curtin
Gina Haspel and Pinocchio From Rome
Juana Carrasco Martin
The United States is a Country Addicted to Violence
Dean Baker
Wealth Inequality: It’s Not Clear What It Means
Robert Dodge
At the Brink of Nuclear War, Who Will Lead?
Vern Loomis
If I’m Lying, I’m Dying
Valerie Reynoso
How LBJ initiated the Military Coup in the Dominican Republic
Weekend Edition
May 18, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Andrew Levine
The Donald, Vlad, and Bibi
Robert Fisk
How Long Will We Pretend Palestinians Aren’t People?
Jeffrey St. Clair
Wild at Heart: Keeping Up With Margie Kidder
Roger Harris
Venezuela on the Eve of Presidential Elections: The US Empire Isn’t Sitting by Idly
Michael Slager
Criminalizing Victims: the Fate of Honduran Refugees 
John Laforge
Don’t Call It an Explosion: Gaseous Ignition Events with Radioactive Waste
Carlo Filice
The First “Fake News” Story (or, What the Serpent Would Have Said)
Dave Lindorff
Israel Crosses a Line as IDF Snipers Murder Unarmed Protesters in the Ghetto of Gaza
Gary Leupp
The McCain Cult
Robert Fantina
What’s Wrong With the United States?
Jill Richardson
The Lesson I Learned Growing Up Jewish
David Orenstein
A Call to Secular Humanist Resistance
W. T. Whitney
The U.S. Role in Removing a Revolutionary and in Restoring War to Colombia
Rev. William Alberts
The Danger of Praying Truth to Power
Alan Macleod
A Primer on the Venezuelan Elections
John W. Whitehead
The Age of Petty Tyrannies
Franklin Lamb
Have Recent Events Sounded the Death Knell for Iran’s Regional Project?
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail