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The Unintended Consequences of Genocide


As Israel has declared a 72- hour ceasefire, it also reports ‘mission accomplished’ in Gaza. It might be interesting to see just what that apartheid regime has accomplished.

* Destroyed tunnels, most often used to smuggle into Gaza household items that Israel, in violation of international law, prevents from being imported.

* Massacred nearly 2,000 people, including hundreds of children as young as newborns; injured thousands more.

* Destroyed hundreds of homes, leaving thousands of men, women and children homeless.

* Destroyed power plants, leaving hundreds of thousands of people without electricity or running water.

* Destroyed factories that produce such dangerous items as pretzels, cheese and biscuits.

* Targeted and murdered journalists.

Israeli officials have stated that, in Gaza, they periodically need to ‘mow the lawn’, meaning to destroy infrastructure, and bomb that beleaguered area back as close to the Dark Ages as possible. So one might add that to a list of Israel’s ‘accomplishments’.

The one thing that Israel may most desperately have wanted to accomplish, the unraveling of the newly-formed unity government between Fatah and Hamas, was, perhaps, its greatest failure. That government, shaky perhaps, corrupt definitely, remains intact.

There are, however, some unintended results to this latest genocidal bombing of Palestinians.

* Unexpected international criticism of Israel. While this hasn’t been universal, Israel has seen ambassadors recalled, and even the U.S., which provides Israel with a blank check to do whatever it pleases on the world stage, has dared to timidly issue criticism of its puppet-master. It’s unfortunate that it took the repeated bombings of United Nations schools, which were being used to house thousands of Palestinians driven from their homes, for the U.S. to dare to speak up to Israel, but at least some mild criticism was expressed. The resignation of Sayeeda Warsi, a senior minister in Britain’s Foreign Office, who accused Prime Minister David Cameron’s government of taking a ‘morally indefensible’ approach to the conflict between Israel and Hamas, is also a striking statement against Israel.

* International demonstrations in support of Palestine. Even Israel has seen thousands of its own people protesting the carpet-bombing of the Gaza Strip. London has seen tens of thousands of demonstrators demanding that the British government stop supporting Israel.

* The social media storm that slammed into Israel. Apartheid Israel last ‘mowed the lawn’ in Gaza two years ago. At that time, Twitter had approximately 20 million users. Today, it has over 120 million, and Twitter users have spread around the globe graphic pictures and information that the news media didn’t dare report. This, at least in part, resulted in huge demonstrations in front of London’s BBC headquarters, causing that organization to announce it would review its policies to see if it was, in fact, reporting in a manner biased towards Israel.

* Greater motivation for the BDS (Boycott, Divest and Sanction) movement. As people see graphic photos of young children playing on a beach being targeted and blown to bloody bits by IDF (Israeli Defense Forces) terrorists, someone basically apathetic becomes motivated.

* Further overall isolation of Israel from the international community. This may not actually be a separate category, since those listed above all contribute to it. The demonstrations, cancellations of Israel-sponsored events, the growing BDS movement and the increasing awareness, thanks in large part to social media, of Israel’s horrific crimes, cannot forever be ignored by the governments of the people who show their opposition to Israel by supporting these actions.

The one nation that seems to be the slowest in changing its sour tune, and condemning the unspeakable human rights violations that Israel perpetrates, is, not surprisingly, the United States. As this writer has said previously, the U.S. sees human rights as all well and good, as long as they don’t interfere with the U.S.’s strategic or financial interests. One must remember that, just between the beginning of 2012 and the end of 2013, pro-Israel lobby groups donated over $8 million dollars to Congressional and presidential candidates. Over the last couple of decades, these lobbies have donated tens of millions of dollars to candidates. And there are few more self-serving bodies in the world than the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate. So what if babies, sleeping in their cribs, are savagely ripped apart by weapons that violate international law? Criticizing such murders might reduce the size of the check from some Israeli lobby or other. No, the risk there is far too great.

So, while barely murmuring a whisper in opposition to Israeli genocide of the Palestinians, the U.S. finances it.  While indicating some displeasure with Israel’s decision to bomb a U.N. school housing thousands of Palestinian refugees, the U.S. actually sends more weapons to Israel, so it can continue ‘mowing the Gaza lawn’.

It has always been difficult for the U.S. voter to make a decision between Tweedle-Dum and Tweedle-Dee, the usual candidates offered by the Republicans and Democrats. In the upcoming mid-term elections, the voters will, in all likelihood, need to choose between major party candidates who fall all over each other to be the first to praise and support Israel. That is why this writer, a U.S. citizen who has lived for years in Canada, will write-in names on his absentee ballot. They will be the names of Palestinian journalists, and men and women of this writer’s acquaintance, who live in Gaza and have suffered through yet another one of Israel’s genocidal attacks.

Although the U.S. will oppose it every step of the way, the U.N. looks poised to investigate possible war crimes committed by Israel. Its findings will probably not be surprising, since the U.N. has issued more resolutions critical of Israel than it has of all other nations combined. But until the citizenry awakens from its public-relations induced sleep, and sees that the U.S. is financing genocide, nothing will change. There is evidence from the last few weeks that perhaps a large crack in the wall of U.S. and Israeli public relations has appeared. Those shocked by Israel’s crimes must widen it.

Robert Fantina’s latest book is Empire, Racism and Genocide: a History of US Foreign Policy (Red Pill Press).


Robert Fantina’s latest book is Empire, Racism and Genocide: a History of US Foreign Policy (Red Pill Press).

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