Click amount to donate direct to CounterPunch
  • $25
  • $50
  • $100
  • $500
  • $other
  • use PayPal
It’s your last chance to make a tax-deductible donation to CounterPunch in 2017. Help us gear up to fight the status-quo in 2018! Every dollar counts!
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Meek Moment Triggers Demands for Justice Reform

by

The recent incarceration of star Philadelphia rapper Meek Mill brings up many issues beyond how the justice system should handle obstinate individuals. A judge imprisoned Mill for serial violations of his parole conditions.

One issue is many of those supporting Mill have never engaged in activities to address structural injustice in the justice system – the kinds of problems those supporters say must be reversed in the case of their revered rapper.

Pennsylvania has one of the nation’s highest racially disproportionate prison populations where 47 percent of the inmates are black and 10 percent are Hispanic. Blacks comprise less than 12 percent of Pennsylvania’s population and Hispanics are seven percent. Nearly 30 percent of all inmates in Pennsylvania’s state prisons are from Philadelphia only accounts for 12.8 percent of the state’s residents.

Another issue implicated in the Mill matter involves the advocacy for more minorities in the criminal justice system as a remedy for reducing structural inequities based on race/racism. The two Philadelphia police officers that severely beat Mill severely during an arrest were black as is the judge who sentenced Mill.

The imprisonment of Mill for parole violations provoked condemnation around the world. A Change.org petition calling for Mill’s release contained over 351,000 signatures one week after his sentencing to a 2-4-year prison term

The recent celebrity-studded rally outside of Philadelphia’s City courthouse, where hundreds demanded the release of rapper Mill, included sharp criticisms of inequities in the criminal justice system.

Speakers from popular hip-hop artists to pro football players to State Representatives and a sports legend all slammed the prison sentence meted to Mill and serious racial inequities in the justice system like race-based Stop-&-Frisk policing – a scourge in Philadelphia for decades.

Basketball legend Julius “Dr. J” Erving, the NBA Hall of Famer who played for the Philadelphia 76ers, called Mill’s sentence cruel and “rendered under unsavory circumstances,” a reference to alleged antics by Mill’s judge.

Current 76ers co-owner Michael Rubin requested leniency for Mill in a letter he sent to that sentencing judge. Rubin and Mill are personal friends.

Popular Hip Hop artist Rick Ross said, “This demonstration will speak for so many others. What happened to Mill is not just a miscarriage of justice. It is an abortion of justice.” Ross stated that the Mill rally was his first participation in a public protest over justice system inequities.

Pennsylvania State Representative Jordan Harris noted how conservatives in the Pennsylvanbia state legislature want more mandatory minimum sentences “when we know mandatory minimums sentences don’t work.”

Philadelphian Mill, born Robert Williams, received the sentence from Common Pleas Court Judge Genece Brinkley who has presided over his case beginning with his 2008 drugs/gun conviction.

Brinkley had withheld incarceration for the chart-topping artist during prior parole violations, extending breaks to Mill that most in comparable circumstances do not get. Parole violators comprise one-third of the 47,318 inmates encarcerated in the state’s prisons.
When Brinkley sentenced Mill to prison, she indicated her patience had run out with the rapper. Brinkley cited Mill’s failed a drug test this year and his two arrests this year: one for a scuffle in the St. Louis airport and the other in New York City. NYPD arrested Mill for reckless endangerment after he posted a video of himself on social media doing wheelies on an ATV without a helmet in NYC.

While authorities withdrew charges for the St. Louis and NYC incidents, Brinkley considered each a parole violation. When Brinkley sentenced Mill to prison, she rejected recommendations from prosecutors and parole personnel for no jail time.

Mill’s attorney, Joe Tacopina, blasted Judge Brinkley, calling her sentence a personal vendetta.

Tacopina asserts Brinkley attempted to have Mill record a song where he would mention her by name and Brinkley attempted to have Mill leaving his current manager, music mogul Jay Z and hire a personal friend of hers for the job instead.

Brinkley could not respond to the accusations leveled by Tacopina due to restrictions in the state’s judicial code of conduct that bar judges from commenting on pending cases.

However, that conduct code instructs judges to conduct their personal and extrajudicial activities to minimize risking conflict with the obligations of judicial office.

Tacopina’s allegations raise questions about Judge Brinkley’s adherence to judicial conduct code requirements to avoid impropriety and the appearance of impropriety. Rule 1.3 of that code, for example, states a judge “shall not abuse the prestige of judicial office to advance the personal or economic interests of the judge or others, or allow others to do so.”

The FBI is examining Judge Brinkley’s actions in the Mill case according to media reports that the FBI neither confirms nor denies.

More articles by:

Linn Washington, Jr. is a founder of This Can’t Be Happening and a contributor to Hopeless: Barack Obama and the Politics of Illusion, (AK Press). He lives in Philadelphia.

Weekend Edition
December 15, 2017
Friday - Sunday
Paul Street
What’s Not Happening With Mr. Jones
Timothy M. Gill
The Height of Racial Resentment: White Cops
Andrew Levine
Democrats Have Much to Learn and the Odious Have Much to Teach Them
Luciana Bohne
Operation Jerusalem Capital: Second Balfour Declaration or Arab-Israeli NATO?
Anthony DiMaggio
#Me Too: Women are Speaking Out, Are We Listening?
Jeffrey St. Clair
Out Walked Monk
Ann Robertson - Bill Leumer
The Demoralizing Impact of Trump, But Hope Has Arrived
Samantha Paez – Sandra de los Santos
The Most Dangerous Place for Mexican Women is in the Streets
Martin Billheimer
Assassins of the Image: the CIA as Cultural Gatekeeper
Jérôme Duval
From Slave Trade to Debt: Occupation Disguised as “Discovery”
Vijay Prashad
The October Revolution
Steve Martinot
Twisted Thinking: Police Militarization in Berkeley
Robert Fantina
Juvenile Delinquency in U.S. Government
Dave Lindorff
Stupidity and Blindness Have Destroyed Whatever Democracy the US Ever Had
Pete Dolack
You are Working Harder and Getting Paid Less
Joseph Natoli
The Axioms of the Other
Susan Babbitt
Why Don Quixote?
Ralph Nader
What Does Trump Mean by “Make America Great Again”?
Ramzy Baroud
Towards a New Palestinian Beginning
Binoy Kampmark
Escaping Reality: Roy Moore and the Rage of Decency
Mark Luskus
Corporate Interests Are Warping the Internet
Ron Jacobs
Sinking in the Swamp
Brian Cloughley
Prepare! Peruse!! Prevail!!!
Jill Richardson
We Agree Assault is Bad, Now Let’s Agree on How to Punish It
Jeremy Corbyn
The Greatest Threats to Our Common Humanity
Walter Clemens – Stephen Advocate
The Amoral Code of America’s Dirty Old Men
Jessicah Pierre
Trump’s Cruel Policy on Haitian Refugees
George Wuerthner
Water Rights or Water Privileges?
Nick Pemberton
What I Learned in Ghana 
Missy Comley Beattie
It’s Capitalism
Tom H. Hastings
Stop Trump movement
Thomas Knapp
The Real Internet Censorship Threat
Robert Koehler
Peace on the Far Side of Nuclear Weapons
Kary Love
Christmas Letter to Jesus
Tom Clifford
China: From the Treasure Fleet to One Belt, One Road
Charles R. Larson
Trump’s Blueprint for State Capture
M. Shadee Malaklou
Jay-Z’s 4:44 Moves Black Radical Thought Through and Beyond the Classroom
Michael Dickinson
What About Our Debts, Pope Francis?
Phil Rockstroh
What Was Verifiably Great About America: Fragments of a Memoir Set to a Musical Soundtrack
Edward Curtin
A Man Turns
December 14, 2017
John W. Whitehead
Surveillance That Never Sleeps
Pam Martens - Russ Martens
Roy Moore’s Loss: a Victory for the Young Girls of America
Eric Toussaint
Debt is a Determining Factor in History
Liaquat Ali Khan
Appropriation of Jerusalem
Kenneth Surin
Selective Impressions of the New Zealand-Aotearoa Conjuncture
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail