FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Glass Ceiling Politics

The glass ceiling got a sever knock leaving it with 18 million cracks back in 2008. So goes urban mythology US style. Hillary’s cracked it / This I know / For the TV told me so.

And by all accounts, well, a lot of accounts, she’s going to punch a hole right through it come November. The Free World, America the Exceptional, the world’s largest economy, the huddled masses – shush, unfortunately they’re still with us – are going to have a new leader. Forget for a minute that a great number of good people in that country who don’t actually like her very much.

A new head of state will emerge. Gorbymania, the folksy charm of Ronald Reagan, the Queen of England’s serenity not to mention her sovereign people and overseas territories , the Second Coming will have nothing to compare. Surely where Hillary Rodham Clinton leads others will follow.

Hang on a minute. This is the 21st century and before this there was history. Things happened.

There was Reagan’s old mate, Margaret Thatcher. Whatever she may have thought herself, technically she was not head of state. The queen, remember. But she was elected prime minister of the UK. A lot of Brits didn’t like her either.   And we all know Angela Merkel heads up the Federal Republic of Germany.

Across the Irish Sea there have been two elected women presidents in the Republic of Ireland. The first, Mary Robinson, went on to become the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights.

In Latin America Nicaragua elected Violeta Chamorra president in 1990. Neighbouring Costa Rica has had Laura Chinchilla as president. Further south Cristina Fernández de Kirchner was elected president of Argentina, Michelle Bachelet in Chile and  Dilma Rousseff in Brazil.

Africa is no stranger to women presidents. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, besides being a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, is today’s president of Liberia and the first elected head of state in Africa. In southern Africa Joyce Banda became head of state in Malawi 2012. And there are plenty of others.

Chandrika Bandaranaike Kumaratunga of Sri Lanka became president of that Asian country in 1994. Her mother Sirimavo Bandaranaike was prime minister for two periods during the 1960s and 1970s. And of course there was Indira Gandhi, prime minister of India from 1966 until 1984, a woman of international standing.

This is serious business, it’s not a case of the feminization of a Star Trek fantasia; to boldly go where no man has gone before. The US is playing catch up with a slowly but steadily changing world. There is more than one glass ceiling in the world and women from all over have been breaking through it for years.

Why is the US taking so long?

More articles by:

Sam Gordon worked in a Belfast factory, then an engineer in the merchant navy, a trainer, researcher and co-coordinator of community projects in Scotland. A graduate from various universities, on a good day he claims he’s a decorative artist and sometimes writer. Most days he’s a blacksmith, welder, and painter in Nicaragua.

Weekend Edition
July 20, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Paul Atwood
Peace or Armageddon: Take Your Pick
Paul Street
No Liberal Rallies Yet for the Children of Yemen
Nick Pemberton
The Bipartisan War on Central and South American Women
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Are You Putin Me On?
Andrew Levine
Sovereignty: What Is It Good For? 
Brian Cloughley
The Trump/NATO Debacle and the Profit Motive
David Rosen
Trump’s Supreme Pick Escalates America’s War on Sex 
Melvin Goodman
Montenegro and the “Manchurian Candidate”
Salvador Rangel
“These Are Not Our Kids”: The Racial Capitalism of Caging Children at the Border
Matthew Stevenson
Going Home Again to Trump’s America
Louis Proyect
Jeremy Corbyn, Bernie Sanders and the Dilemmas of the Left
Patrick Cockburn
Iraqi Protests: “Bad Government, Bad Roads, Bad Weather, Bad People”
Robert Fantina
Has It Really Come to This?
Russell Mokhiber
Kristin Lawless on the Corporate Takeover of the American Kitchen
John W. Whitehead
It’s All Fake: Reality TV That Masquerades as American Politics
Patrick Bobilin
In Your Period Piece, I Would be the Help
Ramzy Baroud
The Massacre of Inn Din: How Rohingya Are Lynched and Held Responsible
Robert Fisk
How Weapons Made in Bosnia Fueled Syria’s Bleak Civil War
Gary Leupp
Trump’s Helsinki Press Conference and Public Disgrace
Josh Hoxie
Our Missing $10 Trillion
Martha Rosenberg
Pharma “Screening” Is a Ploy to Seize More Patients
Basav Sen
Brett Kavanaugh Would be a Disaster for the Climate
David Lau
The Origins of Local AFT 4400: a Profile of Julie Olsen Edwards
Rohullah Naderi
The Elusive Pursuit of Peace by Afghanistan
Binoy Kampmark
Shaking Establishments: The Ocasio-Cortez Effect
John Laforge
18 Protesters Cut Into German Air Base to Protest US Nuclear Weapons Deployment
Christopher Brauchli
Trump and the Swedish Question
Chia-Chia Wang
Local Police Shouldn’t Collaborate With ICE
Paul Lyons
YouTube’s Content ID – A Case Study
Jill Richardson
Soon You Won’t be Able to Use Food Stamps at Farmers’ Markets, But That’s Not the Half of It
Kevin MacKay
Climate Change is Proving Worse Than We Imagined, So Why Aren’t We Confronting its Root Cause?
Thomas Knapp
Elections: More than Half of Americans Believe Fairy Tales are Real
Ralph Nader
Warner Slack—Doctor for the People Forever
Lee Ballinger
Soccer, Baseball and Immigration
Louis Yako
Celebrating the Wounds of Exile with Poetry
Ron Jacobs
Working Class Fiction—Not Just Surplus Value
Perry Hoberman
You Can’t Vote Out Fascism… You Have to Drive It From Power!
Robert Koehler
Guns and Racism, on the Rocks
Nyla Ali Khan
Kashmir: Implementation with Integrity and Will to Resolve
Justin Anderson
Elon Musk vs. the Media
Graham Peebles
A Time of Hope for Ethiopia
Kollibri terre Sonnenblume
Homophobia in the Service of Anti-Trumpism is Still Homophobic (Even When it’s the New York Times)
Martin Billheimer
Childhood, Ferocious Sleep
David Yearsley
The Glories of the Grammophone
Tom Clark
Gameplanning the Patriotic Retributive Attack on Montenegro
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail