FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Brett Kavanaugh and the Scummy System That Made Him

Photo Source Fibonacci Blue | CC BY 2.0

I don’t often think fondly of Christopher Hitchens, but an insight of my ex-friend did brighten my eyes during the last week.

Specifically, after I sent out a series of news releases effectively arguing that then-President Bill Clinton should be impeached “for the right reasons”–specifically, illegal bombings, Hitchens objected. He argued that the distinction between Clinton’s personal and professional actions was a false one, that “it’s all part of the same scummy guy.”

As some argue that Kavanaugh shouldn’t be judged on actions he committed when he was 17, are they pretending they are ignorant of his professional record, of his pattern of lying under oath even before Ford came forward?

Are we to act as though Kavanaugh’s apparent attempted rape of Christine Blasey Ford has no relation to his backing torture?

Are we supposed to pretend that there’s no connection between being a privileged hoodlum and flacking for corrupt presidents and corporations?

Are we supposed to just go along as though there’s no relationship between putting misogynistic crap on your high school yearbook and expecting to get away with it and brazenly lying about it under oath decades later?

Should we really pretend that having a high school cabal who clearly seem to use their sense of privilege (Kavanaugh’s mother was a judge) to get away with whatever they want to do doesn’t relate to cliquish associations like the Federalist Society, using the law to further the interests of elites?

The problem is the the power of privilege that causes silence among those who are not part of it.

Where are those “values voters” I hear about?

I’ve heard feminists say to the point of cliché that rape “isn’t about sex, it’s about power”. I’ve seen a few articles pointing out the “power of sexual violence” exposed by Ford’s testimony, but virtually no utterance connecting that violence and will to power to Kavanaugh’s professional work.

Kavanaugh didn’t just apparently try to rape Ford years ago, he shamelessly lied about it now, openly falsifying what terms he used meant — as he lied under oath about other things regarding is professional work to the Senate Judiciary Committee. With Barely. Anyone. Raising. Their. Voice. At. Him.

Kavanaugh–like Oliver North and Clarence Thomas before him –was able to use a faux anger to bully punching bag Democrats who seemed more concerned about appearing judicious than winning. Many ask if Kavanaugh has the temperament to be a judge, almost to preclude more substantial arguments against him. The unasked question is if the Democrats have the temperament to be effective.

Who showed fire in their belly and articulated Kavanaugh’s lying under oath? Who went for the jugular? Sen. Dick Durbin came close to doing so about Kavanaugh failing to call for an FBI investigation–and then a (pathetic) FBI investigation happened. That should be a lesson.

Kavanaugh, when he was working for Ken Starr, suggested that Clinton be asked “If Monica Lewinsky says you inserted a cigar into her vagina while you were in the Oval Office area, would she be lying?”

Where was the senator asking “If someone says ‘boofing’ means anal sex and not flatulence as you claim and ‘Devil’s Triangle isn’t a drinking game as you claim under oath, but a reference to sex between two males and a female, would they be lying?” or “Amnesty International has recommended that your nomination be slowed since you could be involved in violations of international law. So, are you a war criminal?”

Such a senator was not to be found. Some senators laid the basis for showing Kavanaugh lied under oath. And perhaps they expect that he will be impeached once they get a majority. But who knows what happens between now and then.

In terms of making the case to the public in a way that could not be ignored, they at best fell short. The best a few senators could bring themselves to do was mumble something about perjury when what was needed was to do down the litany.

By contrast, it would appear Kavanaugh, who was charged with getting right-wing judges through congress during the Bush administration, rolled out his own nomination by inoculating himself against the weakness he knew he had: Stressing his credentials as a girl’s basketball coaching, loving dad to his daughters and mentor to females in the legal profession.

And then he and Republican senators put on their act of moral outrage that should have come from the critics of Kavanaugh. Perhaps there was some of the genuine anger in the streets in protests against Kavanaugh– that seem to have come too little too late–but at best rarely from the committee hearing room.

And those optics largely prevailed: all part of the same scummy system.

More articles by:

Sam Husseini is founder of the website VotePact.org

Weekend Edition
December 14, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Andrew Levine
A Tale of Two Cities
Peter Linebaugh
The Significance of The Common Wind
Bruce E. Levine
The Ketamine Chorus: NYT Trumpets New Anti-Suicide Drug
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Fathers and Sons, Bushes and Bin Ladens
Kathy Deacon
Coffee, Social Stratification and the Retail Sector in a Small Maritime Village
Nick Pemberton
Praise For America’s Second Leading Intellectual
Patrick Cockburn
The Yemeni Dead: Six Times Higher Than Previously Reported
Nick Alexandrov
George H. W. Bush: Another Eulogy
Brian Cloughley
Principles and Morality Versus Cash and Profit? No Contest
Michael Duggin
Climate Change and the Limits of Reason
Victor Grossman
Sighs of Relief in Germany
Ron Jacobs
A Propagandist of Privatization
Robert Fantina
What Does Beto Have Against the Palestinians?
Richard Falk – Daniel Falcone
Sartre, Said, Chomsky and the Meaning of the Public Intellectual
Robert Fisk
The Parasitic Relationship Between Power and the American Media
Stephen Cooper
When Will Journalism Grapple With the Ethics of Interviewing Mentally Ill Arrestees?
Jill Richardson
A War on Science, Morals and Law
Ron Jacobs
A Propagandist of Privatization
Evaggelos Vallianatos
It’s Not Easy Being Greek
Nomi Prins 
The Inequality Gap on a Planet Growing More Extreme
John W. Whitehead
Know Your Rights or You Will Lose Them
David Swanson
The Abolition of War Requires New Thoughts, Words, and Actions
J.P. Linstroth
Primates Are Us
Bill Willers
The War Against Cash
Jonah Raskin
Doris Lessing: What’s There to Celebrate?
Ralph Nader
Are the New Congressional Progressives Real? Use These Yardsticks to Find Out
Binoy Kampmark
William Blum: Anti-Imperial Advocate
Medea Benjamin – Alice Slater
Green New Deal Advocates Should Address Militarism
John Feffer
Review: Season 2 of Trump Presidency
Frank Clemente
The GOP Tax Bill is Creating Jobs…But Not in the United States
Rich Whitney
General Motors’ Factories Should Not Be Closed. They Should Be Turned Over to the Workers
Christopher Brauchli
Deported for Christmas
Kerri Kennedy
This Holiday Season, I’m Standing With Migrants
Mel Gurtov
Weaponizing Humanitarian Aid
Thomas Knapp
Lame Duck Shutdown Theater Time: Pride Goeth Before a Wall?
George Wuerthner
The Thrill Bike Threat to the Elkhorn Mountains
Nyla Ali Khan
A Woman’s Selfhood and Her Ability to Act in the Public Domain: Resilience of Nadia Murad
Kollibri terre Sonnenblume
On the Killing of an Ash Tree
Graham Peebles
Britain’s Homeless Crisis
Louis Proyect
America: a Breeding Ground for Maladjustment
Steve Carlson
A Hell of a Time
Dan Corjescu
America and The Last Ship
Jeffrey St. Clair
Booked Up: the 25 Best Books of 2018
December 13, 2018
John Davis
What World Do We Seek?
Subhankar Banerjee
Biological Annihilation: a Planet in Loss Mode
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail