Click amount to donate direct to CounterPunch
  • $25
  • $50
  • $100
  • $500
  • $other
  • use PayPal
Please Support CounterPunch’s Annual Fund Drive
We don’t run corporate ads. We don’t shake our readers down for money every month or every quarter like some other sites out there. We only ask you once a year, but when we ask we mean it. So, please, help as much as you can. We provide our site for free to all, but the bandwidth we pay to do so doesn’t come cheap. All contributions are tax-deductible.
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Walt Whitman on C-SPAN, Fox News and Wolf Blitzer’s Voice

I’ve been watching the Democratic Convention on C-SPAN, a channel that has no commentators, no analysts, no commercials, no crawls. If applause goes on for ten minutes, C-SPAN shows ten minutes of applause. If there is a hole in the program because someone spoke shorter than the schedulers expected, C-SPAN shows what is going on in the hall during the hole in the program.

The only things added are occasional boxes at the bottom of the screen announcing the order of upcoming speakers or interviews scheduled for the next morning. There are brief cutaways during the speeches, sometimes just giving the flavor of the room (people in their buttons and silly hats, waving flags and dancing with enthusiasm that seems generated as much by the presence of cameras as by feet that won’t stay still), sometimes showing celebrities (half of “Sex in the City” was there), and sometimes showing political figures reacting to the speeches (my favorite was Hillary Clinton, not looking the least bit happy during Teresa Heinz Kerry’s performance).

For people used to the constant stimulation of CNN or FOX, the unfiltered presentations C-SPAN can be disorienting. Perhaps it’s like bicycling without the training wheels: if you don’t pay attention, you’ll miss things that matter. On C-SPAN there’s nobody to tell you where you are at every moment. In the spaces between speakers, Fox filled the air with anti-Democrat hatred and the kind of distortion documented in Outfoxed. CNN reporters talked to one another and Wolf Blitzer’s pounding voice, in which all facts are of equal value,* went on and on, like the big bass drum that has no melody but which trumps every other instrument. And all the time-when speakers were speaking or when the commentators were commenting-the Fox and CNN screens were ablaze with logos, inserts, crawls, cutaways, cutins, cutouts, cutups, cuteness. They were busy, busy, always busy.

All their talk reminds me of the worst English teacher I ever knew, someone who parsed everything to death so there was not one bit of poetry or meaning left, someone for whom talking about the poem was infinitely more important than experiencing the poem, and whose own voice was infinitely more important than the poet’s. When Ted Koppell said there were 15,000 journalists covering that convention, I imagined that you could hear the buzz of every one of them talking at once, their voices drowning out the vastly outnumbered delegates and speakers.

I roamed only briefly, then went back to C-SPAN, which was, for all the yelling and cheering by the delegates and the live and canned music blaring, tranquil by comparison. C-SPAN doesn’t fill every inch of space; there is room on C-SPAN for a person to think.

Emile de Antonio, the great political documentary filmmaker who died in 1989, disliked television-except for C-SPAN, which he had on much of the time. It was the only channel, he said, that let you see anything entire. All the others gave you snippets, sound bites, always with more talk by the newscaster than the person making the news. You could learn things about people, de Antonio said, by watching and listening to them for an hour that you could not learn listening to some pundit telling you what was important. The networks, he said, were there for one reason and one reason only: to sell you stuff. And the people who appeared there were salesmen, doing everything they could do to make you keep looking while the commercials rolled. On commercial television, you were the product, the program existed to deliver you to the commercial. The anchors were highly paid, highly-polished performers. C-SPAN has no commercials; C-SPAN has no anchors. C-SPAN leaves you alone with what is going on. There is nothing on C-SPAN except what is on C-SPAN, nothing to C-SPAN other than what you see on C-SPAN.

It was Walt Whitman who wrote the best commentary on this, on the difference in what has been occurring on C-SPAN and on Fox and CNN and networks (during the few minutes they’ve spent covering the convention) these past few days:

When I heard the learn’d astronomer,
When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me,
When I was shown the charts and diagrams, to add, divide, and measure them,
When I sitting heard the astronomer where he lectured with much applause in the lecture-room,
How soon unaccountable I became tired and sick,
Till rising and gliding out I wander’d off by myself,
In the mystical moist night-air, and from time to time
Look’d up in perfect silence at the stars.

BRUCE JACKSON is SUNY Distinguished Professor and Samuel P. Capen Professor of American Culture at SUNY Buffalo. He edits the web journal Buffalo Report. He can be reached at: bjackson@buffalo.edu

 

More articles by:

Bruce Jackson’s most recent books are Inside the Wire: Photographs from Texas and Arkansas Prison (University of Texas Press, 2013) and In This Timeless Time Living and Dying on Death Row in America (with Diane Christian, University of North Carolina Press, 2012). He is SUNY Distinguished Professor and James Agee Professor of American Culture at University at Buffalo

October 17, 2018
Patrick Cockburn
When Saudi Arabia’s Credibility is Damaged, So is America’s
John Steppling
Before the Law
Frank Stricker
Wages Rising? 
James McEnteer
Larry Summers Trips Out
Muhammad Othman
What You Can Do About the Saudi Atrocities in Yemen
Binoy Kampmark
Agents of Chaos: Trump, the Federal Reserve and Andrew Jackson
David N. Smith
George Orwell’s Message in a Bottle
Karen J. Greenberg
Justice Derailed: From Gitmo to Kavanaugh
John Feffer
Why is the Radical Right Still Winning?
Dan Corjescu
Green Tsunami in Bavaria?
Rohullah Naderi
Why Afghan Girls Are Out of School?
George Ochenski
You Have to Give Respect to Get Any, Mr. Trump
Cesar Chelala
Is China Winning the War for Africa?
Mel Gurtov
Getting Away with Murder
W. T. Whitney
Colombian Lawyer Diego Martinez Needs Solidarity Now
Dean Baker
Nothing to Brag About: Scott Walker’s Economic Record in Wisconsin:
October 16, 2018
Gregory Elich
Diplomatic Deadlock: Can U.S.-North Korea Diplomacy Survive Maximum Pressure?
Rob Seimetz
Talking About Death While In Decadence
Kent Paterson
Fifty Years of Mexican October
Robert Fantina
Trump, Iran and Sanctions
Greg Macdougall
Indigenous Suicide in Canada
Kenneth Surin
On Reading the Diaries of Tony Benn, Britain’s Greatest Labour Politician
Andrew Bacevich
Unsolicited Advice for an Undeclared Presidential Candidate: a Letter to Elizabeth Warren
Thomas Knapp
Facebook Meddles in the 2018 Midterm Elections
Muhammad Othman
Khashoggi and Demetracopoulos
Gerry Brown
Lies, Damn Lies & Statistics: How the US Weaponizes Them to Accuse  China of Debt Trap Diplomacy
Christian Ingo Lenz Dunker – Peter Lehman
The Brazilian Presidential Elections and “The Rules of The Game”
Robert Fisk
What a Forgotten Shipwreck in the Irish Sea Can Tell Us About Brexit
Martin Billheimer
Here Cochise Everywhere
David Swanson
Humanitarian Bombs
Dean Baker
The Federal Reserve is Not a Church
October 15, 2018
Rob Urie
Climate Crisis is Upon Us
Conn Hallinan
Syria’s Chessboard
Patrick Cockburn
The Saudi Atrocities in Yemen are a Worse Story Than the Disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi
Sheldon Richman
Trump’s Middle East Delusions Persist
Justin T. McPhee
Uberrima Fides? Witness K, East Timor and the Economy of Espionage
Tom Gill
Spain’s Left Turn?
Jeff Cohen
Few Democrats Offer Alternatives to War-Weary Voters
Dean Baker
Corporate Debt Scares
Gary Leupp
The Khashoggi Affair and and the Anti-Iran Axis
Russell Mokhiber
Sarah Chayes Calls on West Virginians to Write In No More Manchins
Clark T. Scott
Acclimated Behaviorisms
Kary Love
Evolution of Religion
Colin Todhunter
From GM Potatoes to Glyphosate: Regulatory Delinquency and Toxic Agriculture
Binoy Kampmark
Evacuating Nauru: Médecins Sans Frontières and Australia’s Refugee Dilemma
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail