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That Scottish Play

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Woke up to the very unsettling news that Scotland will not be divorcing the UK. I’ll admit this very small naïve part of me hoped this might be a possibility—that a non-violent separation from a neoliberal-mentality overlord could actually occur. This is all assuming the results are on the up and up. Of course, Emma Goldman had it right about voting. Every single time I deny her words of wisdom, this sort of thing happens. Things stay the same, or shift in nuance, not substance.

The possible split kept being framed in terms of marriage, so by that thought process….. Scotland has opted to stay in this loveless marriage because it is just plain easier that way. They won’t have awkward dinner parties as far as who to invite and all. I hope they enter into some sort of quasi-religious counseling to bring about the fullness and glory that will be their union from this time forward. The make up sex will surely be awful. Pale limbs (very pale this is the UK, after all) twining, discussing bills and oil deals during.

Now Scotland is very much a part of the disgusting royal baby loving empire, and this is slightly unforgiveable.  If they had just opted for independence they could have banned all coverage of those little brats. The power was in the palm of your hands. But now, alas. Enjoy hearing about those kids and every milestone they reach (first peasant flogged?).

It is a truly sad thing to opt for a dismal status quo out of fear. I saw that some were told in Scotland that they would not be able to get organs for transplants should this separation occur. If Scotland would have gone for independence, they could have one of my kidneys. The offer still stands if they get their act together in the future. I have only one of most of the other important organs, but I already am signed up to donate upon my demise. I can write on my driver’s license to feel free to send my liver, heart, and lungs to Scotland. Just don’t get mixed up and make haggis out of it.

This was a bit of a generational rift from what I understand as well. Those who fear change (sadly the older, usually) opt for what they consider stability. Again, they have that loveless union to consider in the aged years, and all that it stands for. I consider that we have seen the play-out of extreme Empire building, and the trend will be for smaller locales to yell out for autonomy since their needs are not being considered fully by the globalists. It is truly time for these things to swing in the opposite direction, but the question remains—if it won’t occur by peaceful means, the future will certainly go in another direction. And I can’t imagine how screwed over the young of the world are feeling right now, especially in nations with older members of society comfortably retired, talking about the “indifference” of the youth.

Decisions based on fear often have tragic outcomes (or at least tedious and icky like that pale limb twining image I put in your head a few paragraphs ago).

That Scottish Play for independence had about as much luck going for it as Macbeth did.

Kathleen Wallace lives in the Midwest. 

Kathleen Wallace writes out of the US Midwest and can be reached at klwallace@riseup.net

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