FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

The Final Straw for the People of Ethiopia?

by

Faced with a brutal repressive regime, the people of Ethiopia inside the country and within the worldwide diaspora –frustrated, angry and desperate – are considering alloptions to elicit fundamental change in the country.

The EPRDF, who seized power from the communist Derg in 1991, rule the country through fear and intimidation. Development aid, including food and other essentials, is distributed in a partisan manner, so too employment opportunities. The Government’s human rights record is appalling and an arsenal of ambiguous, universally condemned legislation is used to control and suppress the populace. The “deeply flawed” [Human Rights Watch (HRW)] Anti Terrorism Act, being the bluntest judicial weapon, is repeatedly employed to silence critical voices and imprison those who dare to speak out against the government. Since its adoption in 2009 “the independent media have been decimated by politically motivated prosecutions under the law…Blogs and Internet pages critical of the government are regularly blocked,” [Ibid] and an all-pervasive atmosphere of fear is created by the paranoid dictatorship that spies on opposition members and journalists using surveillance practices that “violate the rights to freedom of expression, association, and access to information.” [HRW]

Although enshrined in the Ethiopian constitution (a liberally acceptable, consistently ignored document written by the EPRDF) as basic rights, as well as in various African and international conventions, including the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights, which Ethiopia has ratified, freedom of the media, of assembly and association, together with all forms of political dissent are essentially outlawed. The opposition parties have up until now been marginalized and largely ineffective.

Fictitious charges

The latest innocent voice to be silenced is that of Andargachew Tsige, a British citizen and secretary general of the Ginbot 7 (G7), a unity movement founded in 2008 to bring about “a national political system in which government power and political authority is assumed through peaceful and democratic process based on the free will and choice of citizens of the country.”[Ginbot 7] He was charged in absentia and “sentenced to death while in exile for plotting a coup,” [BBC] a trumped up charge that has no basis in fact, which he has repeatedly vehemently denied.

On 23rd June Yemeni security personnel detained Mr. Tsige while transiting via Sanaa to Eritrea. He is now imprisoned inside Ethiopia, where torture and violent mistreatment is commonplace. The British government, a major donor and misguided supporter of the Ethiopian regime has a duty to apply all pressure to secure his immediate release; “If the British government is not complicit with this kidnapping and this rendition of Mr Andargachew Tsige to the Ethiopian regime – [which] will obviously torture him, accuse him of all sorts of things and eventually kill him – then the British government has to get immediately the release of Mr Andargachew.” [Ana Gomez MEP on BBC]

The Ethiopian government, who in May signed an agreement of cooperation relating toeconomic, investment and security issues with the Yemen authorities (although it is unclear if this includes extradition), welcomed the arrest, saying “he is a criminal, and he definitely will have his day in court.” The judiciary functions more or less as an arm of the government enforcing EPRDF policy and denying justice. Getachew Reda, government spokesman, predictably and spuriously, “accused him of plotting terror attacks in Ethiopia.” [Al Jazeera] In 2011 the government unsurprisingly labeled G7 a terrorist organization, along with the Ogaden National Liberation Front (ONLF), who are fighting for the Ogaden people’s right to self-determination and the Oromo Liberation Front (OLF), who are struggling for independence for the Oromo population – the single largest group in the country.

To the untrained eye Ethiopia appears stable in a region of almost total instability; it is a misleading social steadiness however, and masks deep-seated widespread bitterness and simmering fury towards the ruling party. The arrest of Andargachew Tsige is part of a government strategy to undermine any movement for change, to create an atmosphere of fear amongst those who are brave enough to speak out against the regime, and cultivate a false impression, presumably aimed at Ethiopia’s principle donors (Britain, America, the European Union), that there is some kind of terrorist plot at work, and they are the righteous ones fighting alongside their Western allies against extremism. Since the 9/11 attacks on America and George W’s reiterated declaration of a ‘war on terror’, the ‘T’ word has been used by repressive regimes throughout the world to tarnish opposition groups and civilian protest movements. Terrorism is indeed operating within Ethiopia. It can be seen at work in Gambella where villagers are forced from their homes into camps, their land taken from them and sold to foreign corporations, in the Omo Valley, Amhara, Oromia and the Ogaden region where women are raped and mutilated, men killed and tortured children scarred for life, villages burnt to the ground: it is State Terrorism. The terrorist commanders are the EPRDF politicians, the military and Liyu Police the front-line henchmen carrying out their masters’ terrifying orders. In many cases throughout the country the human rights violations committed daily by the Ethiopian government qualify as war crimes and crimes against humanity. It is time long overdue that the country’s allies acted to support the people and challenge what is a vicious criminal dictatorship.

Catalyst for Action

The illegal detention of Andargachew Tsige in Yemen and his subsequent transfer to Ethiopia has enraged many in the country as well as those ardently working for change within the diaspora community. Whilst some extreme voices may be calling for an armed uprising, the way forward is through sustained political activism, peaceful protest and community unity. If we are ever to build a just world at peace, and create a new civilization based on altogether different values, the destructive, violent patterns of the past must be laid aside. Revenge and retribution must give way to forgiveness and justice, tolerance and understanding. In this devoutly religious country let Love not hate be the guiding force of those working for change, the source and sustenance of their actions, for as Martin Luther King rightly said “darkness cannot drive out darkness: only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate: only love can do that.”[From ‘A Testament of Hope]

The understandable emotional reaction to the arrest of Tsige needs to give rise to sustained, coordinated collective action inside Ethiopia, supported by worldwide demonstrations by the diaspora. For too long the people have been silent in the face of injustice and violent suppression; fearful of government retribution they have looked to others to act – the British, the Americans, the Europeans– and whilst they do indeed have a duty to stand up for the people of Ethiopia, it is the people themselves that must take their destiny in their own hands. With a population of 92 million spread across nine different states and dozens of tribal groups, it is essential that the people unite against the government and do not turn on one another. Many groups around the country are subjected to the same government abuse and mistreatment, in Gambella, Amhara, the Ogaden region, the Lower Omo valley and in Oromia; they are confronted by a common enemy and need to unite behind a collective cause.

Social revolution and collective action is often triggered by a catalyst, an event that demands action – a final straw that breaks the back of apathy and complacency. The arrest of Andargachew Tsige is such an event. Now is the time for the Ethiopian people to unite, and, overcoming the fear that has inhibited them for so long, demand an end to tyranny and their right to justice, freedom and fundamental democratic change.

Graham Peebles is director of the Create Trust. He can be reached at: graham@thecreatetrust.org

Graham Peebles is director of the Create Trust. He can be reached at: graham@thecreatetrust.org

February 11, 2016
Bruce Lesnick
Flint: A Tale of Two Cities
Ajamu Baraka
Beyonce and the Politics of Cultural Dominance
Shamus Cooke
Can the Establishment Fix Its Bernie Sanders Problem?
John Hazard
The Pope in Mexico: More Harm Than Good?
Joyce Nelson
Trudeau & the Saudi Arms Deal
Zarefah Baroud
The Ever-Dangerous Mantra “Drill, Baby Drill”
Anthony DiMaggio
Illinois’ Manufactured Budget Crisis
Colin Todhunter
Indian Food and Agriculture Under Attack
Binoy Kampmark
Warring Against Sanders: Totalitarian Thinking, Feminism and the Clintons
Robert Koehler
Presidential Politics and the American Soul
Thomas Knapp
Election 2016: The Banality of Evil on Steroids
Cesar Chelala
In Microcephaly in Children Caused by the Zika Virus or by Pesticides?
February 10, 2016
Eoin Higgins
Clinton and the Democratic Establishment: the Ties That Bind
Fred Nagel
The Role of Legitimacy in Social Change
Jeffrey St. Clair
Why Bernie Still Won’t Win
Mike Whitney
Putin’s Aleppo Gamble Pays Off
Chris Martenson
The Return of Crisis: Everywhere Banks are in Deep Trouble
Ramzy Baroud
Next Onslaught in Gaza: Why the Status Quo Is a Precursor for War
Sheldon Richman
End, Don’t Extend, Draft Registration
Benjamin Willis
Obama in Havana
Jack Smith
Obama Intensifies Wars and Threats of War
Rob Hager
How Hillary Clinton Co-opted the Term “Progressive”
Mark Boothroyd
Syria: Peace Talks Collapse, Aleppo Encircled, Disaster Looms
Lawrence Ware
If You Hate Cam Newton, It’s Probably Because He’s Black
Jesse Jackson
Starving Government Creates Disasters Like Flint
Bill Laurance
A Last Chance for the World’s Forests?
Gary Corseri
ABC’s of the US Empire
Frances Madeson
The Pain of the Earth: an Interview With Duane “Chili” Yazzie
Binoy Kampmark
The New Hampshire Distortion: The Primaries Begin
Andrew Raposa
Portugal: Europe’s Weak Link?
Wahid Azal
Dugin’s Occult Fascism and the Hijacking of Left Anti-Imperialism and Muslim Anti-Salafism
February 09, 2016
Andrew Levine
Hillary Says the Darndest Things
Paul Street
Kill King Capital
Ben Burgis
Lesser Evil Voting and Hillary Clinton’s War on the Poor
Paul Craig Roberts
Are the Payroll Jobs Reports Merely Propaganda Statements?
Fran Quigley
How Corporations Killed Medicine
Ted Rall
How Bernie Can Pay for His Agenda: Slash the Military
Neve Gordon
Israeli Labor Party Adopts the Apartheid Mantra
Kristin Kolb
The “Great” Bear Rainforest Agreement? A Love Affair, Deferred
Joseph Natoli
Politics and Techno-Consciousness
Hrishikesh Joshi
Selective Attention to Diversity: the Case of Cruz and Rubio
Stavros Mavroudeas
Why Syriza is Sinking in Greece
David Macaray
Attention Peyton Manning: Leave Football and Concentrate on Pizza
Arvin Paranjpe
Opening Your Heart
Kathleen Wallace
Boys, Hell, and the Politics of Vagina Voting
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail