FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

What isn’t Said: Bernie Sanders in 2020

You know, it’s funny what isn’t said. The next president of the United States, upon the 2020 election, is overwhelmingly likely to be Bernie Sanders – things being what they are today and are likely to be in a few years. The only real question at that level is who will be the Vice President? Tulsi Gabbard? Nina Turner?

Who in the Republican or Democratic party could beat Sanders on the second go around? His name recognition is massively increased, to say the least. His political popularity is unmatched, by far. His ability to raise funds is proven.

Speculation about who the Democrats will run as a viable candidate other than Sanders is beyond absurd. It’s beyond stupid. It’s sheer deceit. There is only one reasonable question in this regard and it is severely frowned upon being asked publicly because it gives the game away, the pathetic little corporate game: How on Earth could the Democrats come up with a candidate to compete with Sanders?

They can’t. As far as can be seen. Or, at this point, even imagined.

Given the need, increasingly in the age of social media, for genuine popular appeal, such a candidate would have to outflank Sanders on his left, believably, and the Democrats in no way are willing to support any such thing.

So it’s Sanders obviously. And yet it isn’t said. Not really, or not at all, not yet. They’ll put it off as long as possible. Just as Sanders puts off the question of whether or not he will run for President in 2020, saying it’s too early to consider it. Of course he will run. And of course he is overwhelmingly likely to win. And win two terms. His age? He’s a tough guy. People may be asking him how old he is for the next two decades.

The Republicans will counter with whom? Trump? Shmump. Pence? Whence. Mark Cuban? He would at least give the Republicans a semblance of a chance, but Cuban isn’t as smart as he thinks he is. If he were he would be trying to outflank Sanders on the left, and he’s not. It’s not that Cuban is dull. It’s that he seriously thinks his half-lit room is brilliant. Cuban’s brilliance, such that it is, is narrow, technical. Sander’s brilliance, such that it is, is much more broad, national, if not global.

A Sanders Presidency would be the best thing by far, given the alternative of any conceivable Republican or Democrat. This is so obvious that entire corporate industries are devoted to covering it up.

Sanders is a flawed political figure, of course. Critics like Jeffrey St. Clair and others have made that clear in lacerating detail. At least Sanders would be a step in a progressive direction. At least it would give the world a chance to pull back from going over the cliff edge of climate change, nuclear destruction, and termination by any number of other horrors.

A Bernie Sanders presidential win in 2020 will shift the funny terrain of what is obvious but isn’t said to a higher level, and the possibilities will grow from there.

Tony Christini is author of the antiwar novel Homefront, co-editor the Liberation Lit anthology, and mostly recently author of the anti-empire global novel, Empire All In: A Novel of the Trump Era.

More articles by:

January 21, 2019
Bill Fried
Jeff Sessions and the Federalists
Ed Corcoran
Central America Needs a Marshall Plan
Colin Todhunter
Complaint Lodged with European Ombudsman: Regulatory Authorities Colluding with Agrochemicals Industry
Manuel E. Yepe
The US War Against the Weak
Weekend Edition
January 18, 2019
Friday - Sunday
Melvin Goodman
Star Wars Revisited: One More Nightmare From Trump
John Davis
“Weather Terrorism:” a National Emergency
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Sometimes an Establishment Hack is Just What You Need
Joshua Frank
Montana Public Schools Block Pro-LGBTQ Websites
Louisa Willcox
Sky Bears, Earth Bears: Finding and Losing True North
Robert Fisk
Bernie Sanders, Israel and the Middle East
Robert Fantina
Pompeo, the U.S. and Iran
David Rosen
The Biden Band-Aid: Will Democrats Contain the Insurgency?
Nick Pemberton
Human Trafficking Should Be Illegal
Steve Early - Suzanne Gordon
Did Donald Get The Memo? Trump’s VA Secretary Denounces ‘Veteran as Victim’ Stereotyping
Andrew Levine
The Tulsi Gabbard Factor
John W. Whitehead
The Danger Within: Border Patrol is Turning America into a Constitution-Free Zone
Dana E. Abizaid
Kafka’s Grave: a Pilgrimage in Prague
Rebecca Lee
Punishment Through Humiliation: Justice For Sexual Assault Survivors
Dahr Jamail
A Planet in Crisis: The Heat’s On Us
John Feffer
Trump Punts on Syria: The Forever War is Far From Over
Dave Lindorff
Shut Down the War Machine!
Glenn Sacks
LA Teachers’ Strike: Student Voices of the Los Angeles Education Revolt  
Mark Ashwill
The Metamorphosis of International Students Into Honorary US Nationalists: a View from Viet Nam
Ramzy Baroud
The Moral Travesty of Israel Seeking Arab, Iranian Money for its Alleged Nakba
Ron Jacobs
Allen Ginsberg Takes a Trip
Jake Johnston
Haiti by the Numbers
Binoy Kampmark
No-Confidence Survivor: Theresa May and Brexit
Victor Grossman
Red Flowers for Rosa and Karl
Cesar Chelala
President Donald Trump’s “Magical Realism”
Christopher Brauchli
An Education in Fraud
Paul Bentley
The Death Penalty for Canada’s Foreign Policy?
David Swanson
Top 10 Reasons Not to Love NATO
Louis Proyect
Breaking the Left’s Gay Taboo
Kani Xulam
A Saudi Teen and Freedom’s Shining Moment
Ralph Nader
Bar Barr or Regret this Dictatorial Attorney General
Jessicah Pierre
A Dream Deferred: MLK’s Dream of Economic Justice is Far From Reality
Edward J. Martin
Glossip v. Gross, the Eighth Amendment and the Torture Court of the United States
Chuck Collins
Shutdown Expands the Ranks of the “Underwater Nation”
Paul Edwards
War Whores
Peter Crowley
Outsourcing Still Affects Us: This and AI Worker Displacement Need Not be Inevitable
Alycee Lane
Trump’s Federal Government Shutdown and Unpaid Dishwashers
Martha Rosenberg
New Questions About Ritual Slaughter as Belgium Bans the Practice
Nicky Reid
Panarchy as Full Spectrum Intersectionality
Jill Richardson
Hollywood’s Fat Shaming is Getting Old
Nyla Ali Khan
A Woman’s Wide Sphere of Influence Within Folklore and Social Practices
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail