FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Bush: the Boy in the Bubble

The place where optimism most flourishes is the lunatic asylum.

Havelock Ellis, The Dance of Life

The question on everyone’s lips is what is he smoking? And the follow up question is where did he get it? And among those who like him, enjoy hallucinating, a second follow up question is (although at press conferences he only allows one) can we get some too?

The questions were prompted by Mr. Bush’s comments to reporters On December 1 when he was meeting with President Olusegun Obasanjo of Nigeria. One of the reporters asked about the possibility of postponing the Iraqi elections. That question was posed more than a year after the president dressed up to look like a fighter pilot, stood under a banner on a troop ship proclaiming “Mission Accomplished” and bragged about its success. In the months following that bit of Presidential Theater more than 11, 000 service personnel lost sight, hearing, arms, legs and lives. It was not a great year for those folks. But back to the questions.

We know that Mr. Bush has no need for medical marijuana and it’s not legal where he lives. Furthermore, his administration is intent on making sure that those who actually have need of medical marijuana and whose states permit its use, don’t have access to it. That was why Paul D. Clement, the Acting Solicitor General, argued before the United States Supreme Court on November 29 that letting someone grow marijuana in her own backyard in California for her own medicinal use as authorized by California law, should be prohibited because of its adverse effect on interstate commerce. It affects interstate commerce, so the argument goes, since if she grows all she needs for medicinal purposes in her own back yard she won’t buy it on the open market. That will have an adverse effect on people who make their living growing marijuana in other states who intend to sell it to people living in California. The government, is, as the arguments showed, zealous about protecting the rights of drug suppliers to ply their trade and protecting the profits the drug dealers get from interstate commerce.

The reason for wondering what he smokes, of course, is Mr. Bush’s sunny, if smirksome expression, whenever anyone asks him about how things are going in Iraq. It’s as if someone asked him if the cantaloupe were tasty when standing in the heart of cantaloupe country in Rocky Ford, Colorado, in August. His facial expression suggests that that is about the dumbest question anyone could possibly ask. And so it was that on December 2, he responded to a question about possibly postponing the election in Iraq by saying: “The elections should not be postponed. It’s time for the Iraqi citizens to go to the polls. And that’s why we are very firm on the January 30th date. . . . It’s one of those moments in history where a lot of people will be amazed that a society has been transformed so quickly from one of tyranny and torture and mass graves to one in which people are actually allowed to express themselves at the ballot box.” That was the same day people were amazed to hear that a U.S. soldier on patrol in Mosul was killed, the decapitated body of an Iraqi police offer was discovered and 10 more unidentified bodies were found. It was one day before 14 people were killed in a suicide bombing in Baghdad near a Shi,ite mosque, 12 police officers were killed when their police station in the West of the city was attacked and 27 Iraq civilians and dozens of insurgents were killed in Mosul. Mr. Bush couldn’t comment on those incidents since whatever Mr. Bush is smoking doesn’t enable him to see into the future. Mr. Bush thinks he’s done everything just right in the past and as soon as Iraqis express themselves at the ballot box they,ll quit expressing themselves with explosives.

Richard Armitage outgoing Deputy Secretary of State was interviewed in Australia on December 4. Speaking of Iraq he said: “Well, it’s a bit messy right now. . . . We’re continuing to lose soldiers and Iraqi policemen and National Guard figures are continuing to die as well. . . . [T]raditionally, I think Americans support hope and enthusiasm and opportunity, but after 9-11 it was anger and our fear that we exported.”

Chuck Hagel, a Republican Senator from Nebraska visited with top American commanders in Iraq and said: “I did not find one commander who said to me, We’re winning., They’re doing everything they can. But we have constantly underestimated the insurgency force and the vitality of the insurgency.” Both Mr. Hagel and Mr. Armitage see what is happening. Mr. Bush can’t or won’t. He just keeps on smoking.

CHRISTOPHER BRAUCHLI is a Boulder, Colorado lawyer. His column appears weekly in the Daily Camera. He can be reached at: brauchli.56@post.harvard.edu

 

More articles by:
August 15, 2018
Jason Hirthler
Russiagate and the Men with Glass Eyes
Paul Street
Omaorosa’s Book Tour vs. Forty More Murdered Yemeni Children
Charles Pierson
Is Bankruptcy in Your Future?
George Ochenski
The Absolute Futility of ‘Global Dominance’ in the 21st Century
Gary Olson
Are We Governed by Secondary Psychopaths
Fred Guerin
On News, Fake News and Donald Trump
Arshad Khan
A Rip Van Winkle President Sleeps as Proof of Man’s Hand in Climate Change Multiplies and Disasters Strike
P. Sainath
The Unsung Heroism of Hausabai
Georgina Downs
Landmark Glyphosate Cancer Ruling Sets a Precedent for All Those Affected by Crop Poisons
Rev. William Alberts
United We Kneel, Divided We Stand
Chris Gilbert
How to Reactivate Chavismo
Kim C. Domenico
A Coffeehouse Hallucination: The Anti-American Dream Dream
August 14, 2018
Daniel Falcone
On Taking on the Mobilized Capitalist Class in Elections: an Interview With Noam Chomsky
Karl Grossman
Turning Space Into a War Zone
Jonah Raskin
“Fuck Wine Grapes, Fuck Wines”: the Coming Napafication of the World
Manuel García, Jr.
Climate Change Bites Big Business
Alberto Zuppi - Cesar Chelala
Argentina at a Crossroads
Chris Wright
On “Bullshit Jobs”
Rosita A. Sweetman
Dear Jorge: On the Pope’s Visit to Ireland
Binoy Kampmark
Authoritarian Revocations: Australia, Terrorism and Citizenship
Sara Johnson
The Incredible Benefits of Sagebrush and Juniper in the West
Martin Billheimer
White & Red Aunts, Capital Gains and Anarchy
Walter Clemens
Enough Already! Donald J. Trump Resignation Speech
August 13, 2018
Michael Colby
Migrant Injustice: Ben & Jerry’s Farmworker Exploitation
John Davis
California: Waging War on Wildfire
Alex Strauss
Chasing Shadows: Socialism Won’t Go Away Because It is Capitalism’s Antithesis 
Kathy Kelly
U.S. is Complicit in Child Slaughter in Yemen
Fran Shor
The Distemper of White Spite
Chad Hanson
We Know How to Protect Homes From Wildfires. Logging Isn’t the Way to Do It
Faisal Khan
Nawaz Sharif: Has Pakistan’s Houdini Finally Met his End?
Binoy Kampmark
Trump Versus Journalism: the Travails of Fourth Estate
Wim Laven
Honestly Looking at Family Values
Fred Gardner
Exploiting Styron’s Ghost
Dean Baker
Fact-Checking the Fact-Checker on Medicare-for-All
Weekend Edition
August 10, 2018
Friday - Sunday
David Price
Militarizing Space: Starship Troopers, Same As It Ever Was
Andrew Levine
No Attack on Iran, Yet
Melvin Goodman
The CIA’s Double Standard Revisited
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: The Grifter’s Lament
Aidan O'Brien
In Italy, There are 12,000 American Soldiers and 500,000 African Refugees: Connect the Dots 
Robert Fantina
Pity the Democrats and Republicans
Ishmael Reed
Am I More Nordic Than Members of the Alt Right?
Kristine Mattis
Dying of Consumption While Guzzling Snake Oil: a Realist’s Perspective on the Environmental Crisis
James Munson
The Upside of Defeat
Brian Cloughley
Pentagon Spending Funds the Politicians
Pavel Kozhevnikov
Cold War in the Sauna: Notes From a Russian American
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail