The Speech Biden May Give to Boost His Poll Numbers

Biden giving Oval Office address.

Joe Biden Addresses the Nation, October 20, 2023, Photo: The White House.

My fellow Americans,

You may remember exactly one year ago, on Feb. 20, 2023, six years and one month after concluding my second term as Vice-President, and seven years, eight months, and ten days after the death of my son Beau, I visited Kiev in wartime. There, I affirmed America’s support for Ukraine’s fight against Russia. What you may not remember is that Russia has good relations with Egypt, a country located in North Africa, not North America, led by President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi. That’s a hard name for most people to remember because it has four different parts and the “al” is lowercase, while the first “s” is capitalized!

Egypt has a longstanding, close relationship with Mexico, which is in North America, not North Africa, and is led by President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, a name which also has four parts! Plus, it has an acute accent over the letters e in Andrés and o in López. Almost nobody, not even in Mexico, remembers the name of that accent.

I ask you, my fellow Americans, to call your Representatives to encourage them to fund my package of aid to Ukraine and Israel. I have always been a strong supporter of Israel, but not in Dearborn, Michigan or on college campuses. There, Benjamin Netanyahu is an asshole, and his attacks on Gaza are “over the top”. That’s not a flippant way to describe genocide, but a military term we use here in the White House, meaning “directing weapons at high-altitude targets.” I discussed these munitions, years ago, with my old friends, President Francois Mitterrand of France and Helmut Kohl of Germany while they were still alive, that is, before their deaths in 1996 and 2017 respectively.

In conclusion, thank you for your support. And God bless you, God bless our troops, and God save the Queen.

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Stephen F. Eisenman is Professor Emeritus of Art History at Northwestern University and the author of Gauguin’s Skirt (Thames and Hudson, 1997), The Abu Ghraib Effect (Reaktion, 2007), The Cry of Nature: Art and the Making of Animal Rights (Reaktion, 2015) and other books. He is also co-founder of the environmental justice non-profit,  Anthropocene Alliance. He and the artist Sue Coe have just published American Fascism, Still for Rotland Press. His next book with the artist Sue Coe The Young Person’s Illustrated Guide to American Fascism‘will be published late this summer by OR Books. He can be reached at: s-eisenman@northwestern.edu