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Saying Goodbye to UN Sanctions Against Eritrea

It isn’t often the UN Security Council votes unanimously to remove sanctions against a country, but this past Wednesday, November 14 they did just that by saying goodbye to nine years of UN just punishment against the small, socialist, east African country of Eritrea.

It was Christmas Eve, 2009 when the USA forced through UN Security Council sanctions against Eritrea, with Ambassador Susan Rice storming out into the hallway and ordering a tardy South African Ambassador back into the room so she would have enough votes to pass her edict which would falsely accuse Eritrea of supporting terrorism in Somalia.

It turns out, thanks to Wikileaks, the whole purpose of the sanctions was to sabotage the Eritrean economy by preventing German banks from funding the fledgling Eritrean mining industry.

We know, again thanks to Wikileaks, that, in the words of the senior US diplomat in east Africa and later acting Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs, Don Yamamoto way back in 2007, that Eritrean involvement in Somalia was “insignificant”. Remember, one of the instigators of this classic piece of “fake news” was the Queen of Chaos herself, Hillary Clinton, who alongside her erstwhile enemy, Susan Rice, used their paid minions in the human rights organizations such as HRW’s hitman Tom Malinowski (just elected to the US Congress) to get the ball rolling, spreading their fake news across the media. Guilty as charged, no matter the complete lack of
evidence, full speed ahead with the smear campaign. Eritreans must kneel down and give up our socialist way of life, with brutal consequences to be borne if Pax American was not obeyed.

Nine years later Eritrea has survived crippling sanctions and emerged victorious by bringing peace to the Horn of Africa, concluding a peace deal and ending twenty years of no-war-no-peace with our neighbor Ethiopia.

The humble camel is a symbol of Eritrea, having played such a critical role supplying Eritrean freedom fighters during their thirty-year independence war, so much so its image is on the Eritrean national currency, the Nakfa.

So when the camel is marching, so goes the saying, the Eritrean people are headed towards victory. And when the camel is marching the dogs are barking, or so the saying continues, for the barking dogs of betrayal and defeat living in the west who spread the slander of support for terrorism by Eritrea across the globe

As Eritreans around the world rejoice in the lifting of UN sanctions against their homeland the world has seen an all to rare event, an unanimous UN Security Council ending UNust sanctions against a socialist country, this time the small east African country of Eritrea.

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Thomas C. Mountain attended Punahou School for six years some half a dozen years before “Barry O’Bombers” time there. He has been living and writing from Eritrea since 2006. He can be reached at thomascmountain at g_ mail_ dot _com

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