FacebookTwitterRedditEmail

More Korean War is “Worth it?” To Whom?

Speaking to CNN on the possibility of resuming hostilities in the nearly 70-year-old Korean War (in uneasy ceasefire since 1953), US Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) says “all the damage … would be worth it in terms of long-term stability and national security.”

Worth it, Senator Graham? To whom?

The last period of open war on the Korean peninsula cost somewhere in the neighborhood of 3.5 million lives, including nearly a million soldiers on both sides (36,516 of them American) and 2.5 million civilians in the North and South.

What did the American taxpayer get in return for three years of fighting, tens of thousands of Americans dead, and nearly $700 billion (in 2008 dollars)?

Well, that taxpayer’s government got to decide who’s in charge of part of the Korean peninsula, which, last time I checked, is not a US state or territory.

And that taxpayer’s government got the opportunity to spend hundreds of billions of dollars more of that taxpayer’s money to garrison the North-South border along the 38th Parallel for 65 years. That excludes the off-peninsula costs of the US “security umbrella” covering other Pacific Rim nations.

And that taxpayer’s government got a convenient bugaboo to scare the bejabbers out of that taxpayer with any time peace threatened to break out.

Stability? Well, sure, if what we’re talking about is guaranteeing that the welfare checks continue to reliably arrive in the American military industrial complex’s mailboxes. But apart from that, continued saber-rattling on either side of some of the most militarized acreage on Earth — the so-called “Demilitarized Zone” — is pretty much the definition of instability.

National security? Not so much, if for no other reason than that North Korea never has represented and does not now represent a credible military threat to the United States. If it ever does come to represent such a threat, it will be because the US continues, at the urging of demagogues like Lindsey Graham, to involve itself in the affairs of people thousands of miles away who do not welcome such involvement.

So far, the Korean War hasn’t delivered any benefit of note to the American people, especially in the areas of “stability” or “national security.”

America’s long misadventure on the Korean peninsula has only been worth it to US “defense” contractors and the politicians they own. Yes, Senator Graham, I’m looking at you.

The sooner the US government notifies the South Korean government that America is going home, the better.

 

More articles by:

Thomas L. Knapp is director and senior news analyst at the William Lloyd Garrison Center for Libertarian Advocacy Journalism (thegarrisoncenter.org). He lives and works in north central Florida.

bernie-the-sandernistas-cover-344x550

Weekend Edition
April 26, 2019
Friday - Sunday
Stanley L. Cohen
Death Can be a Slow Traveler: Peltier, Mumia and Rap Brown
Vincent Navarro
Why Left Wing Populism Is Not Enough
Peter Linebaugh
The Earth for Their Possession
Jeffrey St. Clair
Never Satisfied: Willie Dixon Refused to Serve…Anything But the Blues
Paul Street
Joe Biden: An Imperial Corporatist Wrapped in the Bloody Flag of Charlottesville
Martha Rosenberg
Corruption and Mismanagement at USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service’s Put Consumers at Risk, Whistleblower Says
John O'Kane
Demonizing the Few to Alienate and Sway the Many
John Feffer
What’s Driving Bolton’s Attacks on the “Troika of Tyranny”?
Ramzy Baroud
Notre Dame of Gaza: Our Mosques and Churches are Also Burning
Andy Thayer
How Chicago Police Infiltrated, Spied on Anti-NATO Organizers
Katherine Weathers – Hy Thurman
The Etowah Visitation Project: Supporting the Needs of ICE Detainees
Conn Hallinan
Turkey: Revenge of the Kurds
Joshua Frank
How Obama Defanged the EPA Before Trump Gutted the Agency
Jennifer Matsui
The Style Section Meets State Craft: Amal Clooney and the Foreign Policy Influencers
David Rosen
Trump and False Consciousness
Ruth Fowler
The College Admissions Scam Isn’t About Education
John Whitlow
Coming of Age at the End of History
Brian Cloughley
Continual Confrontation in the South China Sea
Tom Engelhardt
Suicide Watch on Planet Earth
David Macaray
A Look at the Talent in the Room
Ron Jacobs
Hating the Homeless
Jonathan Power
Measuring National Power
Adolf Alzuphar
Diary: Notes on LA’s Underground
Chandra Muzaffar
Sri Landa and New Zealand: The Real Link
John Whitlow
Coming of Age at the End of History
Cassidy Block
The US Has a Moral and Historical Responsibility to Aid Migrants
Tom Clifford
Change of Thrones in Japan
N.D. Jayaprakash
Anti-Satellite Weapons Versus National Security: Part One
Alex Liebman – Rob Wallace
A Lethal Industrial Farm Fungus is Spreading Among Us
Binoy Kampmark
Volodymyr Zelenskiy as Actor President
Martha Burk
The Most Dangerous Time for Women’s Rights in Decades
Christopher Brauchli
Trump Family Affair
Nick Licata
The Green New Deal Died in Congress…It Didn’t Have To
Gary Leupp
Time for Trump to Talk to Putin
Matthew Stevenson
Pacific Odyssey: Ghosts of the Matanikau Valley, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands
Sam Gordon
Ireland and India – Conflict and Commonality
Ariel Tomlinson
Make College Affordable for People Like Me
Ellen Birkett Lindeen
Shakespeare Talks about Peace
Stacia Tolman
Gloria Bell’s in Hell
Nicky Reid
We Are All Julian Assange!: An Anarchist Soliloquy
Stephen Cooper
Ska King Derrick Morgan Holds Court in L.A.
Dean Baker
Coming Clean on Washing Machine Tariffs
Louis Proyect
Can Humanity and Nature Co-Exist Under Capitalism?
April 25, 2019
Marc Levy
All My Vexes Are in Texas
Jim Kavanagh
Avoiding Assange
FacebookTwitterRedditEmail