FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

A Method to His Madness: Stephen Paddock and the 2nd Amendment

Sometimes, the effect of an action betrays its motive.  Amongst the most remarkable consequences of Paddock’s horrific crime is that the NRA has, for the first time in the recent history of mass murder in the USA, actually come out in favor of gun control legislation.

What?  Does this mean that Paddock was not a criminal but a revolutionary?  In fact, the very definition of a terrorist; though incomprehensibly a “white” man who loved country music and who “studied arguments for his right to own weapons under the US constitution” according to an acquaintance, as reported by the Guardian on October 4th.

According to this logic, Paddock did it, not in order to declare his “right to bear arms”, but rather to force the gun control industry and their puppets in Congress to actually respect the 2nd Amendment.  Paddock, who suffered from a “God complex”, according to other reports, unleashed hell-fire on his own people to punish them for their ignorance of “his” laws, and to target the client base of the NRA to force them to look past the profit motive.

As someone whose “grasp of detail about the 2nd amendment seemed superior”, according to the boyfriend of Danly’s sister, Paddock would be familiar with the landmark case District of Columbia vs. Heller (2008).  In that case, which struck down a DC ban on handguns, the Supreme Court was clear that the purpose of the 2nd amendment was to protect the right of self-defense, mainly in the home; but did not extend to the right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever or for whatever purpose.

Clearly “bump stocks” are not needed for self-defense in the home, nor is the stockpiling of some 23 or more guns including AK47’s to be smuggled into some den of iniquity in Vegas for the purpose of mass murder.  By making a mockery of the failure to respect the goal of a “well-regulated militia” established in the 2nd Amendment, Paddock calculated that he could single-handedly bring the NRA to its knees. And he did.

This should not surprise us because Paddock was a professional gambler; an expert at calculating risk and reward; who applied these skills in his meticulously planned, and ironic, “revolution”. But he was a gambler with a sense of justice, however merciless. He wasn’t a corporate boss, or a mechanic when he worked for the Post Office, the IRIS and Lockheed Martin; he was an “auditor”.  He was an expert on the enforcement of regulations, who had honed his skills in the regulation of weapons in the Defense Industry.

He was also the son of a bank robber, from whom it would seem he had inherited psychopathic levels of insensitivity.  His action was in this sense a symptom of mental illness, not “pure evil”. But there is no treatment for psychopathology, nor is it even acknowledged by the criminal law as an illness, though it is no more the fault of its victims than is schizophrenia or obsessive-compulsive disorder. The problem is that, unlike the neurotic who mainly tortures himself, the psychopath leaves such a devastating external trail a destruction behind him, literally in this case, bodies strewn in a field.

Paddock was similar then to other political types like Hitler, Stalin, and Nixon (perhaps even Donald Trump?)  But the emerging post-modern revolutionary is different in that he is not a party man.  He is instead a “lone-wolf”, an anarchist of the violent school, for Paddock has shown that today one man can bring down an empire like the NRA, something that in former ages it would have taken an army to achieve.

More articles by:
September 20, 2018
Michael Hudson
Wasting the Lehman Crisis: What Was Not Saved Was the Economy
John Pilger
Hold the Front Page, the Reporters are Missing
Kenn Orphan
The Power of Language in the Anthropocene
Paul Cox – Stan Cox
Puerto Rico’s Unnatural Disaster Rolls on Into Year Two
Rajan Menon
Yemen’s Descent Into Hell: a Saudi-American War of Terror
Russell Mokhiber
Nick Brana Says Dems Will Again Deny Sanders Presidential Nomination
Nicholas Levis
Three Lessons of Occupy Wall Street, With a Fair Dose of Memory
Steve Martinot
The Constitutionality of Homeless Encampments
Kevin Zeese - Margaret Flowers
The Aftershocks of the Economic Collapse Are Still Being Felt
Jesse Jackson
By Enforcing Climate Change Denial, Trump Puts Us All in Peril
George Wuerthner
Coyote Killing is Counter Productive
Mel Gurtov
On Dealing with China
Dean Baker
How to Reduce Corruption in Medicine: Remove the Money
September 19, 2018
Bruce E. Levine
When Bernie Sold Out His Hero, Anti-Authoritarians Paid
Lawrence Davidson
Political Fragmentation on the Homefront
George Ochenski
How’s That “Chinese Hoax” Treating You, Mr. President?
Cesar Chelala
The Afghan Morass
Chris Wright
Three Cheers for the Decline of the Middle Class
Howard Lisnoff
The Beat Goes On Against Protest in Saudi Arabia
Nomi Prins 
The Donald in Wonderland: Down the Financial Rabbit Hole With Trump
Jack Rasmus
On the 10th Anniversary of Lehman Brothers 2008: Can ‘IT’ Happen Again?
Richard Schuberth
Make Them Suffer Too
Geoff Beckman
Kavanaugh in Extremis
Jonathan Engel
Rather Than Mining in Irreplaceable Wilderness, Why Can’t We Mine Landfills?
Binoy Kampmark
Needled Strawberries: Food Terrorism Down Under
Michael McCaffrey
A Curious Case of Mysterious Attacks, Microwave Weapons and Media Manipulation
Elliot Sperber
Eating the Constitution
September 18, 2018
Conn Hallinan
Britain: the Anti-Semitism Debate
Tamara Pearson
Why Mexico’s Next President is No Friend of Migrants
Richard Moser
Both the Commune and Revolution
Nick Pemberton
Serena 15, Tennis Love
Binoy Kampmark
Inconvenient Realities: Climate Change and the South Pacific
Martin Billheimer
La Grand’Route: Waiting for the Bus
John Kendall Hawkins
Seymour Hersh: a Life of Adversarial Democracy at Work
Faisal Khan
Is Israel a Democracy?
John Feffer
The GOP Wants Trumpism…Without Trump
Kim Ives
The Roots of Haiti’s Movement for PetroCaribe Transparency
Dave Lindorff
We Already Have a Fake Billionaire President; Why Would We want a Real One Running in 2020?
Gerry Brown
Is China Springing Debt Traps or Throwing a Lifeline to Countries in Distress?
Pete Tucker
The Washington Post Really Wants to Stop Ben Jealous
Dean Baker
Getting It Wrong Again: Consumer Spending and the Great Recession
September 17, 2018
Melvin Goodman
What is to be Done?
Rob Urie
American Fascism
Patrick Cockburn
The Adults in the White House Trying to Save the US From Trump Are Just as Dangerous as He Is
Jeffrey St. Clair - Alexander Cockburn
The Long Fall of Bob Woodward: From Nixon’s Nemesis to Cheney’s Savior
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail