FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

A Method to His Madness: Stephen Paddock and the 2nd Amendment

Sometimes, the effect of an action betrays its motive.  Amongst the most remarkable consequences of Paddock’s horrific crime is that the NRA has, for the first time in the recent history of mass murder in the USA, actually come out in favor of gun control legislation.

What?  Does this mean that Paddock was not a criminal but a revolutionary?  In fact, the very definition of a terrorist; though incomprehensibly a “white” man who loved country music and who “studied arguments for his right to own weapons under the US constitution” according to an acquaintance, as reported by the Guardian on October 4th.

According to this logic, Paddock did it, not in order to declare his “right to bear arms”, but rather to force the gun control industry and their puppets in Congress to actually respect the 2nd Amendment.  Paddock, who suffered from a “God complex”, according to other reports, unleashed hell-fire on his own people to punish them for their ignorance of “his” laws, and to target the client base of the NRA to force them to look past the profit motive.

As someone whose “grasp of detail about the 2nd amendment seemed superior”, according to the boyfriend of Danly’s sister, Paddock would be familiar with the landmark case District of Columbia vs. Heller (2008).  In that case, which struck down a DC ban on handguns, the Supreme Court was clear that the purpose of the 2nd amendment was to protect the right of self-defense, mainly in the home; but did not extend to the right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever or for whatever purpose.

Clearly “bump stocks” are not needed for self-defense in the home, nor is the stockpiling of some 23 or more guns including AK47’s to be smuggled into some den of iniquity in Vegas for the purpose of mass murder.  By making a mockery of the failure to respect the goal of a “well-regulated militia” established in the 2nd Amendment, Paddock calculated that he could single-handedly bring the NRA to its knees. And he did.

This should not surprise us because Paddock was a professional gambler; an expert at calculating risk and reward; who applied these skills in his meticulously planned, and ironic, “revolution”. But he was a gambler with a sense of justice, however merciless. He wasn’t a corporate boss, or a mechanic when he worked for the Post Office, the IRIS and Lockheed Martin; he was an “auditor”.  He was an expert on the enforcement of regulations, who had honed his skills in the regulation of weapons in the Defense Industry.

He was also the son of a bank robber, from whom it would seem he had inherited psychopathic levels of insensitivity.  His action was in this sense a symptom of mental illness, not “pure evil”. But there is no treatment for psychopathology, nor is it even acknowledged by the criminal law as an illness, though it is no more the fault of its victims than is schizophrenia or obsessive-compulsive disorder. The problem is that, unlike the neurotic who mainly tortures himself, the psychopath leaves such a devastating external trail a destruction behind him, literally in this case, bodies strewn in a field.

Paddock was similar then to other political types like Hitler, Stalin, and Nixon (perhaps even Donald Trump?)  But the emerging post-modern revolutionary is different in that he is not a party man.  He is instead a “lone-wolf”, an anarchist of the violent school, for Paddock has shown that today one man can bring down an empire like the NRA, something that in former ages it would have taken an army to achieve.

More articles by:
Weekend Edition
April 20, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Paul Street
Ruling Class Operatives Say the Darndest Things: On Devils Known and Not
Conn Hallinan
The Great Game Comes to Syria
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Mother of War
Andrew Levine
“How Come?” Questions
Doug Noble
A Tale of Two Atrocities: Douma and Gaza
Kenneth Surin
The Blight of Ukania
Howard Lisnoff
How James Comey Became the Strange New Hero of the Liberals
William Blum
Anti-Empire Report: Unseen Persons
Lawrence Davidson
Missiles Over Damascus
Patrick Cockburn
The Plight of the Yazidi of Afrin
Pete Dolack
Fooled again? Trump Trade Policy Elevates Corporate Power
Stan Cox
For Climate Mobilization, Look to 1960s Vietnam Before Turning to 1940s America
William Hawes
Global Weirding
Dan Glazebrook
World War is Still in the Cards
Nick Pemberton
In Defense of Cardi B: Beyond Bourgeois PC Culture
Ishmael Reed
Hollywood’s Last Days?
Peter Certo
There Was Nothing Humanitarian About Our Strikes on Syria
Dean Baker
China’s “Currency Devaluation Game”
Ann Garrison
Why Don’t We All Vote to Commit International Crimes?
LEJ Rachell
The Baddest Black Power Artist You Never Heard Of
Lawrence Ware
All Hell Broke Out in Oklahoma
Franklin Lamb
Tehran’s Syria: Lebanon Colonization Project is Collapsing
Donny Swanson
Janus v. AFSCME: What’s It All About?
Will Podmore
Brexit and the Windrush Britons
Brian Saady
Boehner’s Marijuana Lobbying is Symptomatic of Special-Interest Problem
Julian Vigo
Google’s Delisting and Censorship of Information
Patrick Walker
Political Dynamite: Poor People’s Campaign and the Movement for a People’s Party
Fred Gardner
Medical Board to MDs: Emphasize Dangers of Marijuana
Rob Seimetz
We Must Stand In Solidarity With Eric Reid
Missy Comley Beattie
Remembering Barbara Bush
Wim Laven
Teaching Peace in a Time of Hate
Thomas Knapp
Freedom is Winning in the Encryption Arms Race
Mir Alikhan
There Won’t be Peace in Afghanistan Until There’s Peace in Kashmir
Robert Koehler
Playing War in Syria
Tamara Pearson
US Shootings: Gun Industry Killing More People Overseas
John Feffer
Trump’s Trade War is About Trump Not China
Morris Pearl
Why the Census Shouldn’t Ask About Citizenship
Ralph Nader
Bill Curry on the Move against Public Corruption
Josh Hoxie
Five Tax Myths Debunked
Leslie Mullin
Democratic Space in Adverse Times: Milestone at Haiti’s University of the Aristide Foundation
Louis Proyect
Syria and Neo-McCarthyism
Dean Baker
Finance 202 Meets Economics 101
Abel Cohen
Forget Gun Control, Try Bullet Control
Robert Fantina
“Damascus Time:” An Iranian Movie
David Yearsley
Bach and Taxes
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail