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The Airline Industry’s Collusion With the Feds

Businesses being in cahoots with the government is nothing new, and it’s certainly not rare; many huge companies (as well as the people that run them) use tax loopholes, prison labor, and a myriad of other nefarious tools that aid their interests and harm the taxpayers. Airline companies, such as American Airlines and United Airlines are often the most egregious perpetrators of this sort of corruption.

The controversy back in April regarding the use of police to violently and aggressively pull David Dao, a paying customer, off of a United flight in Chicago, in favor of non-paying employees, is a textbook example of public servants being used to serve the agenda of a private corporation. Police officers are employees of the state, and should not be used as a substitute for company-paid security and customer-conscious policy, particularly when it comes to the removal of passengers.

It is utterly hypocritical for supporters of the “free market” to be completely okay with major corporations relying on the taxes we pay, which are meant to go towards the wellbeing of the citizenry.

Speaking of taxes, top airlines are not too fond of paying them. Delta, American, United, and US Airways (prior to its merger with American) have consistently lost money, and they use past losses to avoid paying taxes. In 2014, airline analyst Jim Corridore claimed that Delta Airlines would most likely avoid paying taxes for at least three years, and so far, his prediction has remained correct. This despite Delta recording earnings of $1,000,000,000 in the first quarter of 2016.

Due to various tax cuts proposed by the Trump administration, wealthy airlines will likely continue to receive unjust, preferential treatment from the American government. The state is meant to support the needs of the taxpaying citizenry. It is not meant to support the agendas of major corporations. This sort of thing just lets companies continue to be absolutely rotten towards the public, the customers they are meant to serve.

They are losing money on account of their own wrongdoing. Why should companies that collude, price-gouge, and violate consumers’ rights have access to an array of unjust methods of corruption that we all have to pay for?  Incentive to improve practices and policies is objectively lessened by these loopholes and benefits. Why improve customer service when you can still turn a profit?

Worst of all, the leaders of these airlines have never had to answer for any of this. Millionaire CEOs rest comfortably knowing that, as of yet, there have been no hearings, no whistleblowers, and no guilt. As long as the public remains unaware and inactive regarding the oppression we are facing, this will go on and on and on.

American legislators have disregarded the needs of the working class. Millions are left without healthcare, and the immensely affluent perpetually oppress the poor and disenfranchised. These are the issues that politicians should be busy with, not aiding corporate interests.

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