• Monthly
  • $25
  • $50
  • $100
  • $other
  • use PayPal

SPRING FUNDRAISER

Is it time for our Spring fundraiser already? If you enjoy what we offer, and have the means, please consider donating. The sooner we reach our modest goal, the faster we can get back to business as (un)usual. Please, stay safe and we’ll see you down the road.
FacebookTwitterRedditEmail

National Genocide Day

It’s here.  As the brisk North winds and sharply chill days announce winter’s arrival we gather joyfully with family and dear friends around tables laden with roast turkey, stuffing, cranberry sauce and homemade pumpkin pie, to give thanks and celebrate once again our annihilation of an entire race.

You say, Jesus, that’s a cold shot, nobody thinks of it that way.  You’re right, of course, and that’s the point.  The reality of the means of “settlement” of America has been so fantasticly transmuted by propaganda–now daintily deemed “perception management”, “framing the argument”–that the brutal ugliness of the story has been supplanted by a vacuous, insipid fairy tale created with stunning cynicism out of the infantile imagination of the State.

The historical narrative of American conquest and occupation is one of invasion and extermination, of relentless pressure relentlessly applied, with the use of every murderous method, means, and mechanism in the arsenal of violent barbarity, from the Hordes of Genghiz Khan on down.

Of course, it was not done on a formulated plan; nor was it accomplished in a single irresistible sweep such as Attila’s invasion of medieval Europe, that very nearly made our own ancestors Mongols.  The total appropriation of America was incremental, tidal, but it was not less overwhelming for that.

From the first precarious landings the object was occupation, possession, and exploitation for gain.  Nothing new in that: it’s what invasions are about.  It began awkwardly, clumsily, driven by a God-terrorized Christianity that considered all life outside its appallingly ignorant and arrogant dogma as blind, soulless, worthless, and damned.

As the power balance shifted radically toward whites with rapid population gain, this demonizing–doubtless reciprocated–fueled horrific, unmitigated savagery in the ferocious assault on native people and their lands.

With the 19th century the end was a foregone conclusion.  A huge, growing nation armed with all the power science could provide, harried, herded, ravaged, and eradicated whole tribes until, when the last spasms of futile, courageous resistance were crushed, the broken, violated, devastated remnants were hazed into outdoor prisons, condemned to freeze, starve and die by the cruelty and inhumanity of a conscienceless people.

No one could have foretold at the end of the frontier with fulfillment of our “Manifest Destiny” that the same impulses and intentions that drove the native genocide would one day, in a far more lethal manifestation, motivate the intimidation, brutalization, and destruction of hundreds of millions of people of color and their weak, poor, struggling countries around the world.

But old habits die hard, if at all, and that which worked well in the youth of a man or nation tends to be relied on in maturity.  So it is with America: the  purveyorer and promulgater of violent military aggression in the interests of massive exploitation of the resources and patrimony of nations who can be profitably, and relatively painlessly, battered, plundered and eviscerated.

Iraq, Afghanistan, Lybia and Syria, have been blasted by the same degree of violence that the Creeks, Seminoles, Cherokees, Tecumseh’s Shawnee, the Cheyenne at Sand Creek, Cochise and Geronimo’s Apaches, the Sioux of Crazy Horse, the Blackfeet of Heavy Runner, and Joseph’s Nez Perce suffered en route to slavery, alcoholism and suicide in the American Gulag.

Santayana asserted that those who don’t learn from history are condemned to repeat it, but what can one say of a nation which intentionally subverts that learning?  America has worked so hard, so long at deceiving its people with Exceptionalist tripe that in the gross dissonance between Obama’s words and deeds, one sees it no longer distinguishes truth from falsehood.

Most grimly, sadly, disgracefully, at this moment, with the nation about to celebrate again the vulgar fantasy the idea of “Thanksgiving” evokes, we face the odious fact that the American genocide, in its large outlines, is not over.  At Standing Rock, battle-armed, SWAT-rigged police deploy dogs, clubs, guns and water cannon in subzero weather against native people defending their water and life, in the interests of Big Oil and its dirty profits.

Jefferson said, “I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just.”

The nightmare isn’t over.  The American tragedy goes on.  And in the agony and chaos America has created, at home and around the world, the flag that should rightfully be called “Old Gory”, still flies above a guilty, unjust, and unrepentant Empire.

More articles by:

Paul Edwards is a writer and film-maker in Montana. He can be reached at: hgmnude@bresnan.net

June 03, 2020
Anthony DiMaggio
Revolution, Not Riots: Prospects for Radical Transformation in the Covid-19 Era
Jennifer Loewenstein
From Mississippi to Minneapolis: Leaving the ‘Abyss of Despair’
Kenneth Surin
The UK Compared With Other Countries on the Pandemic
Paul Street
“Total Domination”: Popular Rebellion in the Shadow of Trumpism-Fascism
Kenn Orphan
The Sadism of American Power
John Pilger
The Coup Against ‘The Most Loyal Ally’
Eric Murphy
The Police Are The Out-Of-Towners Provoking Violence
Melvin Goodman
How the Washington Post Accommodates Disinformation
Rev. William Alberts
It’s the Worshippers Who Are “Essential”
Georgina Downs
No, the Public Fury Will Not “Move On” Prime Minister!
George V. Wright
It is Happening Here
M. G. Piety
Tales from the Dark Side of Customer Service, or “Christians” Giving Christians a Bad Name
Chandra Muzaffar
A Superpower in Chaos
Thomas Knapp
Time to Stop Messing Around and Strike at the Root of Police Violence
Thomas M. Hanna
The Oligopoly That Controls Our Digital Infrastructure Has Deepened Economic and Racial Divides
Andrew Stewart
The Ethics of Police Murder Video Exhibition: Democratizing The News Feed, Re-Traumatizing The Survivors, Or Both?
Binoy Kampmark
Death, Protest and George Floyd
David Rovics
Who’s Trashing Downtown Every Night and Why?
Harvey Wasserman
Trump Is No Accident
Behrooz Ghamari Tabrizi
Biden and the Common Sense Voter
Timothy Ingalsbee
Ecosystems, Logging and the Definition of Insanity
Elliot Sperber
The Birds of Brooklyn
June 02, 2020
Zoltan Grossman
Deploying Federal Troops in a War at Home Would Make a Bad Situation Worse
Nicholas Buccola
Amy Cooper is Christian Cooper’s Lost, Younger Sister 
Manuel García, Jr.
Global Warming is Nuclear War
Patrick Cockburn
An Unavoidable Recognition of Failure: Trump’s Withdrawal From Afghanistan
John Feffer
Is It Time to Boycott the USA?
Kathy Kelly
Beating Swords to Plowshares
Lawrence Davidson
U.S. Urban Riots Revisited
Sam Pizzigati
“Failed State” Status Here We Come
Ron Jacobs
In Defense of Antifa
Cesar Chelala
Bolsonaro and Trump: Separated at Birth
George Wuerthner
The BLM’s License to Destroy Sagebrush Ecosystems
Danny Antonelli
The Absurdity of Hope
Binoy Kampmark
Sinister Flatulence: Trump Versus Twitter
John Stanton
How Much Violence and Destruction is Enough for Depraved American Leaders and Their Subjects?
Richard C. Gross
The Enemy Within
Thomas Knapp
Trump’s “Free Speech:” Doctrine: Never, Ever, Ever Mention He’s a Liar
John W. Whitehead
This Is Not a Revolution. It’s a Blueprint for Locking Down the Nation
June 01, 2020
Joshua Frank
It’s a Class War Now Too
Richard D. Wolff
Why the Neoliberal Agenda is a Failure at Fighting Coronavirus
Henry Giroux
Racial Domestic Terrorism and the Legacy of State Violence
Ron Jacobs
The Second Longest War in the United States
Kanishka Chowdhury
The Return of the “Outside Agitator”
Lee Hall
“You Loot; We Shoot”
FacebookTwitterRedditEmail