FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Mr. Trump, I am One of Your Bad Hombres

During the last presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, Trump said, “we have some bad hombres here,” in clear reference to the Latinos coming to the United States. As CNN commentator Van Jones explained, “The only time this man has used Spanish in the entire election was used to stereotype and smear Latino immigrants.” Although you probably meant it, you didn’t smear me, señor Trump.

I was born south of the border in Tucumán, a city in Northern Argentina, to be more precise. My father, a highly cultured person, was also the worst merchant I ever met. Because of some bad financial decisions –for which he didn’t take any tax advantage- we had a modest upbringing.

I was able, however, to obtain my MD degree and later in Buenos Aires my PhD degree in biochemistry. In Buenos Aires, I carried out research at the research institute “Fundación Campomar,” whose director was Dr. Luis F. Leloir, a Nobel laureate in Chemistry.

After five years of doing research in biochemistry I wanted to explore the alluring possibilities of research in microbial genetics, of which very little was done in Argentina at the time. So, together with my wife and one-year old daughter, I came to the U.S. in 1971. I experienced a tremendous cultural shock.

I confronted a culture quite unlike the one in which I grew up, with a different set of values. In addition, my knowledge of English was much more precarious than I thought at the time and found communicating with my colleagues extremely difficult, at least at the beginning.

The death of my father six months after being in New York, an already painful event, was made worse by the fact that I was unable to go to Argentina and join my family in mourning.

Unlike you, señor Trump, who was lucky to have had a rich father who allowed you to inherit a substantial sum of money, we came to the U.S. with only $500 as our total capital and two pieces of luggage. We didn’t have any friends and the only positive thing was that Dr. Paul Margolin, my boss at The Public Health Research Institute where I was to do research, was an extremely kind man (not a gringo like you, señor Trump).

I conducted research in microbial genetics for several years and then I changed professional orientation and became an international public health consultant for several United Nations agencies and other international organizations.

I was able to do that not because of any personal merit, though. I could do it because of the extraordinary help and efforts of my wife. While working full-time to complement my meager fellowship from Argentina, she obtained a Master’s degree in American Literature and later a PhD in Linguistics at New York University.

My wife is not, I can assure you, a nasty woman, señor Trump. Even so, should you ever meet her, I would advise you not to try anything funny. You may get the surprise of your life.

As you can see, señor Trump, I am one of what you call “bad hombres.” Like millions more, I am a hard working immigrant who looked for the Land of Opportunity in the U.S., something that will not exist, señor Trump, if you become president of the country.

Your no amigo,

César Chelala

More articles by:

Dr. Cesar Chelala is a co-winner of the 1979 Overseas Press Club of America award for the article “Missing or Disappeared in Argentina: The Desperate Search for Thousands of Abducted Victims.”

Weekend Edition
August 17, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Daniel Wolff
The Aretha Dialogue
Nick Pemberton
Donald Trump and the Rise of Patriotism 
Joseph Natoli
First Amendment Rights and the Court of Popular Opinion
Andrew Levine
Midterms 2018: What’s There to Hope For?
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Running Out of Fools
Ajamu Baraka
Opposing Bipartisan Warmongering is Defending Human Rights of the Poor and Working Class
Paul Street
Corporate Media: the Enemy of the People
David Macaray
Trump and the Sex Tape
CJ Hopkins
Where Have All the Nazis Gone?
Daniel Falcone
The Future of NATO: an Interview With Richard Falk
Robert Hunziker
Hothouse Earth
Cesar Chelala
The Historic Responsibility of the Catholic Church
Ron Jacobs
The Barbarism of US Immigration Policy
Kenneth Surin
In Shanghai
William Camacaro - Frederick B. Mills
The Military Option Against Venezuela in the “Year of the Americas”
Nancy Kurshan
The Whole World Was Watching: Chicago ’68, Revisited
Robert Fantina
Yemeni and Palestinian Children
Alexandra Isfahani-Hammond
Orcas and Other-Than-Human Grief
Shoshana Fine – Thomas Lindemann
Migrants Deaths: European Democracies and the Right to Not Protect?
Paul Edwards
Totally Irrusianal
Thomas Knapp
Murphy’s Law: Big Tech Must Serve as Censorship Subcontractors
Mark Ashwill
More Demons Unleashed After Fulbright University Vietnam Official Drops Rhetorical Bombshells
Ralph Nader
Going Fundamental Eludes Congressional Progressives
Hans-Armin Ohlmann
My Longest Day: How World War II Ended for My Family
Matthew Funke
The Nordic Countries Aren’t Socialist
Daniel Warner
Tiger Woods, Donald Trump and Crime and Punishment
Dave Lindorff
Mainstream Media Hypocrisy on Display
Jeff Cohen
Democrats Gather in Chicago: Elite Party or Party of the People?
Victor Grossman
Stand Up With New Hope in Germany?
Christopher Brauchli
A Family Affair
Jill Richardson
Profiting From Poison
Patrick Bobilin
Moving the Margins
Alison Barros
Dear White American
Celia Bottger
If Ireland Can Reject Fossil Fuels, Your Town Can Too
Ian Scott Horst
Less Voting, More Revolution
Peter Certo
Trump Snubbed McCain, Then the Media Snubbed the Rest of Us
Dan Ritzman
Drilling ANWR: One of Our Last Links to the Wild World is in Danger
Brandon Do
The World and Palestine, Palestine and the World
Chris Wright
An Updated and Improved Marxism
Daryan Rezazad
Iran and the Doomsday Machine
Patrick Bond
Africa’s Pioneering Marxist Political Economist, Samir Amin (1931-2018)
Louis Proyect
Memoir From the Underground
Binoy Kampmark
Meaningless Titles and Liveable Cities: Melbourne Loses to Vienna
Andrew Stewart
Blackkklansman: Spike Lee Delivers a Masterpiece
Elizabeth Lennard
Alan Chadwick in the Budding Grove: Story Summary for a Documentary Film
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail