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Those Who Study Together Go on to Rule Together: Notes on Bringing Statehood to Puerto Rico

The current associate vice president of the Puerto Rico Statehood Students Association is the son of former secretary of state Kenneth McClintock.

The Puerto Rico Statehood Students Association was founded by Kenneth McClintock, then a law student at Tulane University, and former governor Luis Fortuño, then an undergrad at Georgetown.

McClintock’s son is a Georgetown undergrad.

The Puerto Rico Statehood Students Association is a non-profit that organizes university students in the U.S. and Puerto Rico in the interest of bringing statehood to the U.S. colony.

The current Resident Commissioner of Puerto Rico, Pedro Pierluisi, himself a Tulane alumnus, was a founding member of the association.

Francisco Cimadevilla, a former financial consultant under Pedro Rosselló’s governmental administration, was also a founding member.

In order to bring statehood to Puerto Rico, first you have to go study in the states and found something.

Pedro Rosselló completed his undergraduate degree at Notre Dame. Then went on to study medicine at Yale.

Fortuño went to law school at the University of Virginia.

The federally appointed Fiscal Control Board recently awarded its first ever contract to Francisco Cimadevilla’s publicity firm.

The President of the Fiscal Control Board is Pedro Pierluisi’s brother in law. He went to UPENN.

The Fiscal Control Board is tasked with putting Puerto Rico’s financial affairs in order.

The very first contract awarded by the board is for the handling of the board’s public image.

In order to bring statehood to Puerto Rico, students must first learn how to handle public issues amongst their closest friends and family.

Due to the mass migration of islanders to the U.S.—brought on by the economic crisis and the austerity measures implemented by the government—, thousands of Puerto Rican families have had to learn how to handle their private issues across great distances.

McClintock’s son pens columns for the largest Puerto Rican newspaper under the heading “from the diaspora.”

Georgetown University is located in Washington DC. Tuition costs some fifty thousand dollars. The top spring break destinations for U.S. college students are: Cancun, Punta Cana, Puerto Vallarta and Puerto Plata. Are spring breakers diasporic?

The Puerto Rico Statehood Students Association was founded in 1979.

Its first ever president went on to be president of the senate and secretary of state.

His successor went on to become governor.

At least one of its founding members has a contract with the federally appointed Fiscal Control Board.

Is the board part of the Puerto Rican diaspora?

In order to bring statehood to Puerto Rico, first you have to accept that what was possible in 1979 might not be possible in 2016. And vice versa.

For example, in 1979 you couldn’t do business with the Fiscal Control Board. It didn’t exist.

For example, in 1979 leaving the island for a few years in order to complete undergraduate studies at an elite U.S. college did not make you part of the diaspora. It just made you privileged. And next in line for a top government position. Or a nice governmental contract. Or both, eventually.

Francisco Cimadevilla got his bachelor’s at Georgetown. Then went on to study law at Harvard.

In 1979 going to Georgetown was a steal.

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