FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Athletics, Philanthropists and Schools

We know that San Francisco 49ers backup quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s flag and national anthem protest against ongoing police maiming and murdering of unarmed black and brown people is having impacts. Allies in and out of amateur and pro sports are supporting the NFL player and his dissident message of protest against a status quo of racial injustice, a mainstay of US history.

Less well known is the history of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, a deep-pocketed philanthropy, now receiving $500,000 from the 49ers Foundation for “the cause of improving racial and economic inequality and fostering communication and collaboration between law enforcement and the communities they serve here in the Bay Area” The SVCF is no ordinary philanthropy.

According to its website, “SVCF is the largest community foundation, with more than $7.3 billion in assets under management. We partner with families, individuals and corporations to manage and facilitate their philanthropy.”

The SVCF’s mission statement continues.

“We connect donors’ interests to the most pressing needs, whether in Silicon Valley or around the globe. As a comprehensive center for philanthropy, SVCF shapes critical public policy issues, partners with nonprofit groups and institutions advancing the best ideas and directs resources swiftly and strategically toward unforeseen needs.”

One focus of the SVCF is reform of public education. This movement is an obsession of multi-billionaire philanthropists such as Eli Broad, Bill and Melinda Gates and the Walton family. They have made major inroads into reforming the public education system the old-fashioned way, marinating appointed and elected officials with plenty of greenbacks.

Back to the SVCF. It gave $3.2 million in 2014 to the Students First Foundation, the nonprofit behind StudentsMatter, the group that propelled the Vergara v. State of California lawsuit, reports Mercedes K. Schneider, an author, blogger and classroom teacher:

The California State Supreme Court declined to review a lower court’s ruling that the state’s public school K-12 teacher tenure law does not void the constitutional rights of students to the guarantee of equal education. The lawsuit claimed that state statutes such as due process, job probation and layoff procedures for California public school teachers violated the constitutional rights of students to equality of education.

Meanwhile in light of spreading opposition to police violence against unarmed minorities captured on cell phones and officer cameras, the SVCF seeks to improve race and class inequality in the SF Bay Area. Enquiring minds wonder how exactly this effort will proceed.

For example, will the SVCF support community control of police, e.g., hiring and firing of officers who shoot, strangle and Taser unarmed citizens? I asked Sue J. McAllister, SVCF marketing director, for a comment.

“Unfortunately, we do not have any further details on the donation from the 49ers at this time,” she said in an email. “Details are still being decided upon.”

McAllister declined a request for the names of who is deciding on the details, and when work will begin and end. Lucifer is in these details.

More articles by:

Seth Sandronsky is a Sacramento journalist and member of the freelancers unit of the Pacific Media Workers Guild. Emailsethsandronsky@gmail.com

Weekend Edition
May 25, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Melvin Goodman
A Major Win for Trump’s War Cabinet
Andrew Levine
Could Anything Cause the GOP to Dump Trump?
Pete Tucker
Is the Washington Post Soft on Amazon?
Conn Hallinan
Iran: Sanctions & War
Jeffrey St. Clair
Out of Space: John McCain, Telescopes and the Desecration of Mount Graham
John Laforge
Senate Puts CIA Back on Torture Track
David Rosen
Santa Fe High School Shooting: an Incel Killing?
Gary Leupp
Pompeo’s Iran Speech and the 21 Demands
Jonathan Power
Bang, Bang to Trump
Robert Fisk
You Can’t Commit Genocide Without the Help of Local People
Brian Cloughley
Washington’s Provocations in the South China Sea
Louis Proyect
Requiem for a Mountain Lion
Robert Fantina
The U.S. and Israel: a Match Made in Hell
Kevin Martin
The Libya Model: It’s Not Always All About Trump
Susie Day
Trump, the NYPD and the People We Call “Animals”
Pepe Escobar
How Iran Will Respond to Trump
Sarah Anderson
When CEO’s Earn 5,000 Times as Much as a Company’s Workers
Ralph Nader
Audit the Outlaw Military Budget Draining America’s Necessities
Chris Wright
The Significance of Karl Marx
David Schultz
Indict or Not: the Choice Mueller May Have to Make and Which is Worse for Trump
George Payne
The NFL Moves to Silence Voices of Dissent
Razan Azzarkani
America’s Treatment of Palestinians Has Grown Horrendously Cruel
Katalina Khoury
The Need to Evaluate the Human Constructs Enabling Palestinian Genocide
George Ochenski
Tillerson, the Truth and Ryan Zinke’s Interior Department
Jill Richardson
Our Immigration Debate Needs a Lot More Humanity
Martha Rosenberg
Once Again a Slaughterhouse Raid Turns Up Abuses
Judith Deutsch
Pension Systems and the Deadly Hand of the Market
Shamus Cooke
Oregon’s Poor People’s Campaign and DSA Partner Against State Democrats
Thomas Barker
Only a Mass Struggle From Below Can End the Bloodshed in Palestine
Binoy Kampmark
Australia’s China Syndrome
Missy Comley Beattie
Say “I Love You”
Ron Jacobs
A Photographic Revenge
Saurav Sarkar
War and Moral Injury
Clark T. Scott
The Shell Game and “The Bank Dick”
Seth Sandronsky
The State of Worker Safety in America
Thomas Knapp
Making Gridlock Great Again
Manuel E. Yepe
The US Will Have to Ask for Forgiveness
Laura Finley
Stop Blaming Women and Girls for Men’s Violence Against Them
Rob Okun
Raising Boys to Love and Care, Not to Kill
Christopher Brauchli
What Conflicts of Interest?
Winslow Myers
Real Security
George Wuerthner
Happy Talk About Weeds
Abel Cohen
Give the People What They Want: Shame
David Yearsley
King Arthur in Berlin
Douglas Valentine
Memorial Day
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail