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Dems Dropping the N Word: When in Trouble, Blame Ralph

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With the nomination officially sown up, Hillary Clinton supporters came out of the closet and started firebombing their opponents with the N word. Even Ben Jealous, the former head of the NAACP, in a debate with Green Party Presidential candidate Jill Stein, dropped the N word on Democracy Now! this week.

“We can talk about sort of fantasies, visions for the future, but we can’t deny the facts of the past,” Jealous said. “George W. Bush got into the White House because Al Gore lost by about 900 votes in Florida. Ralph Nader got 90,000. The reports, the studies that went back and looked at those voters said 60 percent of them would have gone for Gore if Nader wasn’t on the ballot there.”

That would be one discredited study — not studies — as Nader lawyers Oliver Hall and Theresa Amato have repeatedly pointed out.

But that won’t stop Hillary forces, including Bernie Sanders, from, starting now, and lasting until election day, firebombing all independent thinking voters with the N word.

Show even a hint of independence, and the Hillary supporters here in Philadelphia are all locked and loaded and ready to drop it.

Chris Hedges fired back on Democracy Now!, in a debate against N bomber Robert Reich.

“Is Trump a repugnant personality?” Hedges asked. “Yes. Although I would argue that in terms of megalomania and narcissism, Hillary Clinton is not far behind. But the point is, we’ve got to break away from — which is exactly the narrative they want us to focus on. We’ve got to break away from political personalities and understand and examine and critique the structures of power.”

“And, in fact, the Democratic Party, especially beginning under Bill Clinton, has carried water for corporate entities as assiduously as the Republican Party. This is something that Ralph Nader understood long before the rest of us, and stepped out very courageously in 2000. And I think we will look back on that period and find Ralph to be an amazingly prophetic figure. Nobody understands corporate power better than Ralph. And I think now people have caught up with Ralph.”

When Goodman asked Hedges what Sanders should have done instead of endorsing Clinton, Hedges said — he should have run as the Green Party candidate.

But if he did, he would be N bombing himself, right?

Feel the burn?

“Let’s not forget that Bernie has a very checkered past,” Hedges said. “He campaigned for Clinton in ’92. He campaigned for Clinton again in ’96, after NAFTA — the greatest betrayal of the working class in this country since the Taft-Hartley Act of 1948 — after the destruction of welfare, after the omnibus crime bill that exploded the prison population, and, you know, we now have—I mean, it’s just a monstrosity what we’ve done — 350,000 to 400,000 people locked in cages in this country are severely mentally ill.”

“Half of them never committed a violent crime. That’s all Bill Clinton. And yet he went out and campaigned. In 2004, he called on Nader not to run, to step down, so he could support a war candidate like John Kerry. And I’m listening to Jealous talk about the Iraq War. Sixty percent of the Democratic senators voted for the war, including Hillary Clinton. The idea that somehow Democrats don’t push us into war defies American history.”

Reich said that he was actually all in favor of third parties — but not now.

Maybe after Hillary is elected, Reich said.

Not in 2000.

Not in 2004.

Not in 2008.

Not in 2012.

Not in 2016.

But in 2020?

“I think political strategy is not to elect Donald Trump, to elect Hillary Clinton, and, for four years, to develop an alternative, another Bernie Sanders-type candidate with an independent party, outside the Democratic Party, that will take on Hillary Clinton, assuming that she is elected and that she runs for re-election, and that also develops the infrastructure of a third party that is a true, new progressive party,” Reich said.

Hedges kindly pointed out to Reich that for N dropping neoliberals, tomorrow never comes.

“Well, that’s precisely what we’re trying to do,” Hedges said. “There is a point where you have to — do I want to keep quoting Ralph? — but where you have to draw a line in the sand. And that’s part of the problem with the left, is we haven’t.”

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Russell Mokhiber is the editor of the Corporate Crime Reporter..

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