FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Refusing the “New Normal”

shutterstock_394819144

It has been a rough few weeks, to say the least. Philando Castile, killed by police during a traffic stop, July 6, 2014. Dylan Noble, also killed by police during a traffic stop, July 14, 2016. Both unarmed.  Five Dallas police officers are killed, and nine others wounded in alleged “payback” for police violence, July 7, 2016. Some 40 people, including women and children, executed by the Islamic State in Um al-Housh, Syria, July 5, 2016. Two dozen local soldiers killed by al-Qaeda suicide bombers in Aden, Yemen, July 6, 2016. Noncombatants killed by US bombs against ISIS and unknown US drone civilian victims in up to seven nations. Seven killed and 11 injured in Rashidiya, Iraq suicide attack, July 13, 2016. At least 84 people killed in terrorist attack in Nice, France, July 14, 2016. Sadly, but surely, there are more.  So much heartbreak. So many questions.

Pundits and social media alike have discussed that global violence may be “the new normal.”  In these troubled times, some turn to their faith, as evidenced by the hashtag #prayfornice or the like. I do not write to judge that response, but it is not for me. It’s easy to see how these events and the belief that violence is ubiquitous lead to hopelessness and despair.  While I understand it, my heart heavy as well, that too is not for me.

Both these responses, I believe, do not challenge this so-called new normal. They leave me, and perhaps others, feeling powerless. And that is something I refuse to feel. I know that I personally cannot end gun violence, terrorism or any of these major problems.  But I will not pretend that I there is nothing I can do, that even my simple daily actions have no impact on the world.  I by no means want to be sanctimonious or to bury my head in the sand about the seriousness of these issues. But, reflecting on what I can do, I offer the following list:

* I can believe in the humanity of all people and treat each person I encounter with respect and dignity.

* I can reach out to people I don’t know, making them feel comfortable and included.

* I can do good by my family, my neighbors, my colleagues and others, offering a helping hand, encouraging word, or even just a smile.

* I can share what I have with others through donating my time, skills, food, money, or other things.

* I can speak up when I hear people speak with hatred or prejudice.

* I can make my voice be heard politically by educating myself about candidates and about their voting records so that, perhaps, elections at all levels are won by people who are determined to reduce the violence.

* I can continue teaching my daughter about both the problems and the beauties of the world today, and can help her see that she can use her imagination, her intelligence, and her motivation to be part of the solution.

* I can ensure that I do not act or react with violent words or behaviors, even in the face of conflict.

Although it might be easier to numb the heartbreak, to be resolved to the horrid normalcy of violence, I won’t do it. I hope that others feel that they, too, still have the power to make a much-needed change toward a safer and more peaceful world.

More articles by:

Laura Finley, Ph.D., teaches in the Barry University Department of Sociology & Criminology and is syndicated by PeaceVoice.

April 23, 2018
Patrick Cockburn
In Middle East Wars It Pays to be Skeptical
Thomas Knapp
Just When You Thought “Russiagate” Couldn’t Get Any Sillier …
Gregory Barrett
The Moral Mask
Robert Hunziker
Chemical Madness!
David Swanson
Senator Tim Kaine’s Brief Run-In With the Law
Dave Lindorff
Starbucks Has a Racism Problem
Uri Avnery
The Great Day
Nyla Ali Khan
Girls Reduced to Being Repositories of Communal and Religious Identities in Kashmir
Ted Rall
Stop Letting Trump Distract You From Your Wants and Needs
Steve Klinger
The Cautionary Tale of Donald J. Trump
Kevin Zeese - Margaret Flowers
Conflict Over the Future of the Planet
Cesar Chelala
Gideon Levy: A Voice of Sanity from Israel
Weekend Edition
April 20, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Paul Street
Ruling Class Operatives Say the Darndest Things: On Devils Known and Not
Conn Hallinan
The Great Game Comes to Syria
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Mother of War
Andrew Levine
“How Come?” Questions
Doug Noble
A Tale of Two Atrocities: Douma and Gaza
Kenneth Surin
The Blight of Ukania
Howard Lisnoff
How James Comey Became the Strange New Hero of the Liberals
William Blum
Anti-Empire Report: Unseen Persons
Lawrence Davidson
Missiles Over Damascus
Patrick Cockburn
The Plight of the Yazidi of Afrin
Pete Dolack
Fooled Again? Trump Trade Policy Elevates Corporate Power
Stan Cox
For Climate Mobilization, Look to 1960s Vietnam Before Turning to 1940s America
William Hawes
Global Weirding
Dan Glazebrook
World War is Still in the Cards
Nick Pemberton
In Defense of Cardi B: Beyond Bourgeois PC Culture
Ishmael Reed
Hollywood’s Last Days?
Peter Certo
There Was Nothing Humanitarian About Our Strikes on Syria
Dean Baker
China’s “Currency Devaluation Game”
Ann Garrison
Why Don’t We All Vote to Commit International Crimes?
LEJ Rachell
The Baddest Black Power Artist You Never Heard Of
Lawrence Ware
All Hell Broke Out in Oklahoma
Franklin Lamb
Tehran’s Syria: Lebanon Colonization Project is Collapsing
Donny Swanson
Janus v. AFSCME: What’s It All About?
Will Podmore
Brexit and the Windrush Britons
Brian Saady
Boehner’s Marijuana Lobbying is Symptomatic of Special-Interest Problem
Julian Vigo
Google’s Delisting and Censorship of Information
Patrick Walker
Political Dynamite: Poor People’s Campaign and the Movement for a People’s Party
Fred Gardner
Medical Board to MDs: Emphasize Dangers of Marijuana
Rob Seimetz
We Must Stand In Solidarity With Eric Reid
Missy Comley Beattie
Remembering Barbara Bush
Wim Laven
Teaching Peace in a Time of Hate
Thomas Knapp
Freedom is Winning in the Encryption Arms Race
Mir Alikhan
There Won’t be Peace in Afghanistan Until There’s Peace in Kashmir
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail