FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Grizzly Sardine Can Blues

bearcartoon

We can’t support any more bears. We’ve got bears coming out of our ears. We’ve reached carrying capacity. Such is the purported state of grizzly bears in Yellowstone.

Sound familiar? It should. For those of you who have been paying attention to the rhetoric voiced by agency spokespeople during the last few years, you will have heard the refrain about too many bears in too little space over and over again. In fact, this claim undergirds much of the argument made by the US Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) and state wildlife managers for removing ESA protections from Yellowstone’s grizzlies (which is to say, “delist” them). Just a few weeks ago, in a conversation with environmentalists, FWS Director Dan Ashe emphasized that “the Yellowstone ecosystem just can’t hold any more bears.” Frank van Manen, leader of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) put it another way: “we are packing more sardines in the sardine can.”

If you were inclined to defer to the agency experts, you would probably heave a sigh and say, “well, I guess we just need to move ahead with delisting Yellowstone’s grizzly bears. We’ve reached carrying capacity.” In fact, that is the outcome that the agency experts probably hope for and expect.

Well…I would argue that there is cause to question the experts in this instance. In fact, there is an increasing and to my mind wholly justified tendency for the public to question experts, especially when there is reason to suspect that they are politically motivated. And there is ample evidence for political motivations behind what we are hearing from spokespeople for all of the agencies involved in managing Yellowstone’s grizzly bears, including the government’s scientists (for more on this follow this link and this link).

Unpacking the Sardine Can

To start, it is worth unpacking the concept of “carrying capacity” given that this term is being bandied about with such abandon by government scientists and managers. To listen to van Manen you would think that the number of grizzlies able to live in the Yellowstone ecosystem (i.e., “carrying capacity”) is a static food-related attribute of the land contained within a fixed box. Hence the sardine metaphor.

The truth could hardly be more different. Even accepting the notion of fixed boundaries, within those bounds the food-related capacity of any given acre varies from month to month and year to year. In fact, we’ve seen a long-term and sustained decline in the availability of high-quality foods that has almost certainly caused a decline in the intrinsic food-related capacity of Yellowstone’s core habitat to sustain grizzlies. Cutthroat trout have nearly disappeared; whitebark pine has been substantially reduced; and elk herds have declined, some dramatically. That’s three of the four legs of the food stool that has supported Yellowstone’s grizzly bears (the fourth leg is army cutworm moths). All of the evidence belies any claims, implicit or otherwise, that food-related carrying capacity is static. If anything, the sardine can has shrunk in size.

More importantly, carrying capacity is determined not only by the food-driven rate at which females produce cubs, but also by the rate at which grizzly bears of all description die. So, mortality is a major part of the equation. And guess what causes most deaths of adult grizzlies in Yellowstone? People do. So our lethality to bears is a big part of the carrying capacity equation. Which comes down to our collective attitudes and behaviors, and the extent to which they translate into dead bears. More on this a little later.

And the rate at which young bears (i.e., cubs and yearlings) die also matters. As it turns out, death rates of cubs and yearlings have increased substantially of late, primarily due to “natural” causes—including bears killing bears. Again, to listen to van Manen you would think that young bears in Yellowstone are dying in increasing numbers simply because of increasing densities of adult grizzlies, likening these adults to a bunch of equally lethal pinballs bouncing around according to some random Brownian motion in a fixed space. Too many damn sardines. More on this a little later as well.

The notion of fixed boundaries to an immutable box is a final major fallacy in the government’s “carrying capacity” argument. The capacity of Yellowstone’s ecosystem to support grizzlies is determined not only by the per acre abundance of foods and the unit area lethality of the landscape, but also by the extent of the area within which bears can live and contribute to the larger population. And clearly, this extent has increased substantially over time. We have grizzlies living in roughly twice the area we had them in the 1970s. Moreover, there have been multiple analyses, by government and independent scientists alike, showing that there is ample habitat with natural foods sufficient to support grizzly bears in places where grizzlies have not yet established themselves: the southern Wind River Range, the Palisades area, the Centennials, and more.

A Social Sardine Can?

And, yet, the FWS and their minions claim that the box is fixed, invoking yet another pseudo-idea, that of “social carrying capacity.” More to the point, the FWS claims that there is no more space for grizzlies in Yellowstone because “people” will not accept them anywhere else. So now we have gone from the simplistic static, food-based, box of van Manen’s to a concept fielded by the FWS that begins to grapple, at least on the face of it, with the aspect of carrying capacity that relates to human attitudes and lethality.

But who are these “people” anyway, and who queried them, how? As it turns out, “people” amount to ranchers, outfitters, and others with enough political clout to bully not only state wildlife managers, but also the FWS. As a result, “social carrying capacity” has been defined by a few regressive energy executive as well as some sheep and cattle ranchers who don’t want to live with grizzlies, not by the people whom the agencies are supposed to be serving under the rubric of the public trust. “Social carrying capacity” turns out to be a convenient political ruse, not any sort of on-the-ground reality determined by the attitudes, choices, and behaviors of a wide range of relevant people. In fact, the sardine can could be a whole lot bigger.

The Density Ruse

So, let’s return briefly to the density issue, which is closely tied to the notion of carrying capacity and blithely invoked to explain rising deaths of young bears. Have grizzly bear densities actually increased, as van Manen claims? And, if so, are high densities the reason for increasing death rates among young bears? Well, the answers are No, and Probably Not. As it turns out, the Yellowstone grizzly bear population has not increased to any extent during the last 15 years. It may have even been declining since 2007 (see some info on all of this here and here). At the same time, the distribution of this population has increased by over 40%. Ergo, density axiomatically decreased—not increased. Which debars a connection between deaths of cubs and yearlings and densities of adults, as such. More likely, cubs and yearlings are dying in greater numbers because their moms have turned increasingly to eating meat (including livestock) to compensate for losses of whitebark pine and cutthroat trout. And meat-eating is an incredibly hazardous undertaking for any bear, especially those with vulnerable young (for more information follow this link).

Putting this all together, we have a narrative being promoted by our government officials that is based on a simple-minded, poorly conceived, and highly-politicized notion of this thing called carrying capacity. Moreover, the government narrative is at odds with the best available evidence. All of this politicized spin being billed under the rubric of “science” is clearly designed to support the agenda of delisting Yellowstone’s grizzly bears.

Out of the Sardine Can

In fact, what we have is a picture altogether different from that being painted by government managers and scientists. We have a box with highly fungible and potentially much expandable boundaries within which we have experienced major declines in food-related carrying capacity, but within which, also, we’ve increased carrying capacity attributable to major beneficial changes in human attitudes and behaviors—related to increased sanitation, other controls on human foods, and reductions in livestock. Bear densities have declined, at the same time that distributions have expanded and grizzlies have turned to eating alternative foods, many of which are concentrated on the peripheries of the current ecosystem. This is not a sardine can being crowded by ever greater numbers of sardines.

But perhaps the most important point is one that features us—and what goes on between our ears. History has shown that perhaps the most important determinant of the numbers of grizzly bears that can live in any given area is our behaviors. In turn rooted in our worldviews; how we see ourselves in relation to the world and to the creatures in it. There is no doubt that our European ancestors saw no place for grizzlies in the world. And they proved it by killing 99% of all grizzlies in 98% of all the places they once lived. But we are not our ancestors.

We have the chance to create a world where grizzlies and people coexist in places where we probably can’t even imagine it is possible. But, believe me, it is possible. Grizzlies have proven that they can tolerate us and live among humans with few problems. The famous mother grizzly of Pilgrim Creek, bear #399, is one among many that has proven the point (for some more information on her see thisChristian Science Monitor article). It comes down to us, and the grace and compassion we can bring to coexisting with grizzly bears.

Director Ashe and Dr. van Manen are wrong. We can have more grizzly bears in Yellowstone. And we should have.

More articles by:

David Mattson worked for the grizzly study team for 2 decades. He retired from the US Geological Survey two years ago. 

August 14, 2018
Daniel Falcone
On Taking on the Mobilized Capitalist Class in Elections: an Interview With Noam Chomsky
Karl Grossman
Turning Space Into a War Zone
Jonah Raskin
“Fuck Wine Grapes, Fuck Wines”: the Coming Napafication of the World
Manuel García, Jr.
Climate Change Bites Big Business
Alberto Zuppi - Cesar Chelala
Argentina at a Crossroads
Chris Wright
On “Bullshit Jobs”
Rosita A. Sweetman
Dear Jorge: On the Pope’s Visit to Ireland
Binoy Kampmark
Authoritarian Revocations: Australia, Terrorism and Citizenship
Sara Johnson
The Incredible Benefits of Sagebrush and Juniper in the West
Martin Billheimer
White & Red Aunts, Capital Gains and Anarchy
Walter Clemens
Enough Already! Donald J. Trump Resignation Speech
August 13, 2018
Michael Colby
Migrant Injustice: Ben & Jerry’s Farmworker Exploitation
John Davis
California: Waging War on Wildfire
Alex Strauss
Chasing Shadows: Socialism Won’t Go Away Because It is Capitalism’s Antithesis 
Kathy Kelly
U.S. is Complicit in Child Slaughter in Yemen
Fran Shor
The Distemper of White Spite
Chad Hanson
We Know How to Protect Homes From Wildfires. Logging Isn’t the Way to Do It
Faisal Khan
Nawaz Sharif: Has Pakistan’s Houdini Finally Met his End?
Binoy Kampmark
Trump Versus Journalism: the Travails of Fourth Estate
Wim Laven
Honestly Looking at Family Values
Fred Gardner
Exploiting Styron’s Ghost
Dean Baker
Fact-Checking the Fact-Checker on Medicare-for-All
Weekend Edition
August 10, 2018
Friday - Sunday
David Price
Militarizing Space: Starship Troopers, Same As It Ever Was
Andrew Levine
No Attack on Iran, Yet
Melvin Goodman
The CIA’s Double Standard Revisited
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: The Grifter’s Lament
Aidan O'Brien
In Italy, There are 12,000 American Soldiers and 500,000 African Refugees: Connect the Dots 
Robert Fantina
Pity the Democrats and Republicans
Ishmael Reed
Am I More Nordic Than Members of the Alt Right?
Kristine Mattis
Dying of Consumption While Guzzling Snake Oil: a Realist’s Perspective on the Environmental Crisis
James Munson
The Upside of Defeat
Brian Cloughley
Pentagon Spending Funds the Politicians
Pavel Kozhevnikov
Cold War in the Sauna: Notes From a Russian American
Marilyn Garson
If the Gaza Blockade is Bad, Does That Make Hamas Good?
Sean Posey
Declinism Rising: An Interview with Morris Berman  
Jack Dresser
America’s Secret War on Yemen
Howard Lisnoff
The Use and Misuse of Charity: the Luck of the Draw in a Predatory System
Louis Proyect
In the Spirit of the Departed Munsees
Binoy Kampmark
Banning Alex Jones and Infowars
Mundher Al Adhami
On the Iraqi Protests, Now in Their Second Month 
Jeff Mackler
Nicaragua: Dynamics of an Interrupted Revolution
Robert Hunziker
Peter Wadhams, Professor Emeritus, Ocean Physics
David Macaray
Missouri Stands Tall on the Labor Front
Thomas Knapp
I Didn’t Join Facebook to “Feel Safe”
John Carroll Md
Are Haitian Doctors Burned Out?
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail