FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

The British Holocaust Industry

by

Dublin, Ireland.

You got to love the British … or hate them. Being Irish I tend to hate them, especially at this time of the year when the poppy blooms on every chest on British TV. What is obscure becomes clear around the beginning of each November. How do the British get away with murder? How does British ideology work? How does imperialism infect the British mind? Why is Britain immune to justice? And how does it revitalize itself before it’s next crime against humanity?

The British get away with it all by acting the victim. Or by claiming that it’s military when killing foreigners in foreign lands are innocent and deserves our pity, which amounts to the same thing. In particular a cult is manufactured around Britain’s dead soldiers. A cult that the British public is force fed. The myth is that Britain’s war dead “died protecting us” and it is hammered home every November. Father Christmas comes in December, but before him there’s the arrival of Britain’s ghost army. And like Father Christmas the fallen British soldier is the color of a can of Coke.

The British Holocaust Industry- like the Israeli Holocaust Industry – is rooted in Europe’s modern killing fields. But whereas the Jews were innocent victims, Britain’s soldiers were not. However, to the industrialist this distinction is irrelevant. For him or her the point is that dead Jews and dead Brits are great salesmen. One sells Israel and the other sells imperialism. In short, massive political economies are placed on the shoulders of these dead souls. And considering the close relationship between Britain and Israel (imperialism and Zionism) these two Holocaust Industries not only complement each other, but are partners in a nefarious war against the living. The Brits like the Zionists dig up their dead not to honor them, but to exploit them and target us. Similar to the can of Coke the poppy is attractive to our eyes. Nevertheless, it is a cheap marketing trick.

The poppy originally signified a problem, but today it signifies solidarity with Empire. The problem was World War I and the pointless waste of life that it brought about. The poppy originally was a silent critique of the leadership that led the soldiers to the slaughterhouse. It was a protest – not a symbol of blind patriotism. But today 90 or so years later, the industrialists have turned it around. The poppy now is all about British patriotism rather than British questioning. And the patriotism in question (and here is the extremely sinister side of the poppy) not only harks back to World War I, but also includes the British soldiers who perish in the wars of today. Not only are the graves of Flanders reinvented and remembered, but so too is every other killing field the British have made since then. So what began as a “never again” has become a “forever again”. Hence the British soldiers who gave us the European Holocaust have zero shame today, while engineering an Arab Holocaust. The industrialists (or should that be the financiers) just repackage them and pull our emotional strings until we sympathize with them as we do with the can of Coke.

However, it’s not just the British, it’s the Irish too. I’m beginning to hate myself as well. After giving away its sovereignty to the banks, Ireland is now giving away its memory to the Empire. A few days ago in the streets of Dublin I saw for the first time a poppy on a chest. And on the same day I saw another rare sight – a large Union Jack on someone’s wool hat. And to cap it all off I heard the leader of the Irish Labour Party recall with respect and admiration the Irish who died for the British Empire back in World War I. In today’s clueless Ireland nothing connects. Not only are the past and present unrelated but each is passively consumed like that tasteless can of Coke. The Irish Famine never happened. And British Fascism doesn’t exist.

More articles by:

Aidan O’Brien lives in Dublin, Ireland.

February 22, 2018
T.J. Coles
How the US Bullies North Korea, 1945-Present
Ipek S. Burnett
Rethinking Freedom in the Era of Mass Shootings
Manuel E. Yepe
Fire and Fury: More Than a Publishing Hit
Patrick Bobilin
Caught in a Trap: Being a Latino Democrat is Being in an Abusive Relationship
Laurel Krause
From Kent State to Parkland High: Will America Ever Learn?
Terry Simons
Congress and the AR-15: One NRA Stooge Too Many
George Wuerthner
Border Wall Delusions
Manuel García, Jr.
The Anthropocene’s Birthday, or the Birth-Year of Human-Accelerated Climate Change
Thomas Knapp
Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Russiagate
February 21, 2018
Cecil Bothwell
Billy Graham and the Gospel of Fear
Ajamu Baraka
Venezuela: Revenge of the Mad-Dog Empire
Edward Hunt
Treating North Korea Rough
Binoy Kampmark
Meddling for Empire: the CIA Comes Clean
Ron Jacobs
Stamping Out Hunger
Ammar Kourany – Martha Myers
So, You Think You Are My Partner? International NGOs and National NGOs, Costs of Asymmetrical Relationships
Michael Welton
1980s: From Star Wars to the End of the Cold War
Judith Deutsch
Finkelstein on Gaza: Who or What Has a Right to Exist? 
Kevin Zeese - Margaret Flowers
War Preparations on Venezuela as Election Nears
Wilfred Burchett
Vietnam Will Win: Military Realities
Steve Early
Refinery Safety Campaign Frays Blue-Green Alliance
Ali Mohsin
Muslims Face Increasing Discrimination, State Surveillance Under Trump
Julian Vigo
UK Mass Digital Surveillance Regime Ruled Illegal
Peter Crowley
Revisiting ‘Make America Great Again’
Andrew Stewart
Black Panther: Afrofuturism Gets a Superb Film, Marvel Grows Up and I Don’t Know How to Review It
CounterPunch News Service
A Call to Celebrate 2018 as the Year of William Edward Burghardt Du Bois by the Saturday Free School
February 20, 2018
Nick Pemberton
The Gun Violence the Media Shows Us and the State Violence They Don’t
John Eskow
Sympathy for the Drivel: On the Vocabulary of President Nitwit
John Steppling
Trump, Putin, and Nikolas Cruz Walk Into a Bar…
John W. Whitehead
America’s Cult of Violence Turns Deadly
Ishmael Reed
Charles F. Harris: He Popularized Black History
Will Podmore
Paying the Price: the TUC and Brexit
George Burchett
Plumpes Denken: Crude thinking
Binoy Kampmark
The Caring Profession: Peacekeeping, Blue Helmets and Sexual Abuse
Lawrence Wittner
The Trump Administration’s War on Workers
David Swanson
The Question of Sanctions: South Africa and Palestine
Walter Clemens
Murderers in High Places
Dean Baker
How Does the Washington Post Know that Trump’s Plan Really “Aims” to Pump $1.5 Trillion Into Infrastructure Projects?
February 19, 2018
Rob Urie
Mueller, Russia and Oil Politics
Richard Moser
Mueller the Politician
Robert Hunziker
There Is No Time Left
Nino Pagliccia
Venezuela Decides to Hold Presidential Elections, the Opposition Chooses to Boycott Democracy
Daniel Warner
Parkland Florida: Revisiting Michael Fields
Sheldon Richman
‘Peace Through Strength’ is a Racket
Wilfred Burchett
Vietnam Will Win: Taking on the Pentagon
Patrick Cockburn
People Care More About the OXFAM Scandal Than the Cholera Epidemic
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail