FacebookTwitterRedditEmail

A Brown Party?

Did you see it? Did you hear? Brian Jones just might be running for Lieutenant Governor of the state of New York! On the Green Party ticket! I know what you’re thinking. I thought it myself. Brian Jones? The late Rolling Stone? He died in 1969! Just weeks before Lance Armstong’s father – Neil – landed on the moon. But you know I’m just kidding, right? Lance Armstrong’s dad’s not Neil. Lance Armstrong’s name isn’t even Lance Armstrong. It’s Lance Gunderson. True fact. According to Wikipedia, his father’s name is Eddie – worked for The Dallas Morning News. Just a little bit of… what would you call that? Americana?

At any event… No, Brian Jones has not returned from the hereafter. It’s a fairly common name, Jones. Derived from John. And Brian, well, that’s common, too. Yes, so Brian Jones, a committed activist and public school teacher here in New York, announced he’d like to run. And you know how I found this out? I read about it on the Jacobin website. You know Jacobin, right? They call themselves Jacobin, but don’t worry, they won’t be guillotining any necks anytime soon. Their name, like so many things these days, is merely ironical. Indeed, rather than threatening anyone, their editor-in-chief and publisher, Bhaskar Sunkara, according to The New Statesman, is positioning his publication to be, as Doug Henwood phrased it, “the reasonable alternative to some more threatening force” – you know, like how Martin Luther King, Jr. (before he was radicalized) was supposed to be the “reasonable alternative” to Malcolm X (who wanted to actually, forcefully, redistribute land and whatnot).

So, when I saw this thing about the Greens in this ostensibly Red publication, like any reasonable person I couldn’t help but wonder what it all meant. Was this an instance of the Red-green alliance? Could it mean that the Greens and the Reds, in spite of their differences, are beginning to recognize their common destiny? Or did it, rather, have something to do with that “reasonable alternative” angle? Or was it something else entirely? And then, after considering the various shortcomings of the Reds and the Greens, it occurred to me that it could portend something bigger – in vulgar Hegelese: the overcoming and sublation of their respective limitations in a new unity. That was my first thought. My second thought was: Green and Red Makes Brown – a notion that, pretty much all by itself, suggests… a Brown Party. Brown, like the Earth. Not just plants, trees, vegetables, but land. Brown.

Although I’m partially kidding, this should neither distract nor detract from the fact that Brown raises serious questions. For instance, a Brown Party would have to confront the problem (latent, perhaps, in all Parties) of that which manifested, notably, in the murderous, racist Brownshirts – the Nazi Sturmabteilung, or SA. With racism and xenophobia on the rise (just look at last month’s US Supreme Court ruling in Schuette), a Brown Party would have to critically root out such tendencies. It would not be able to ignore opinions that, for instance, are found among some Greens these days. For who’s unaware of the fact that quite a few people who identify as Greens harbor implicitly genocidal opinions regarding population control (in spite of the fact that most of the world’s pollution and resource extraction is committed by the US, which comprises only 5% of the global population)? To put it mildly, that’s something of a problem – one that manifests in, among other places, the issue of immigration (remember the Sierra Club’s position?). Unlike the Greens, though, a Brown Party would have to explicitly rectify this disturbing phenomenon. And then, of course, there’s green’s other troubling association: money. As mentioned earlier, a “green economy” is not necessarily incompatible with systemic exploitation, poverty, disease, and misery. The Greens need that infusion of Red to rid them of their market-economy shortsightedness and prejudice. Likewise, the Reds need the Greens’ sensitivity to environmental and ecological issues. And both of them are in need of a serious makeover. Vote Brown!

Peter Berllios is a writer and teacher. He can be reached at peterberllios@yahoo.com

 

More articles by:

Peter Berllios is a Brooklyn based writer and artist. He can be reached at peterberllios@yahoo.com and on Twitter @PeterBerllios

bernie-the-sandernistas-cover-344x550
November 12, 2019
Nino Pagliccia
Bolivia and Venezuela: Two Countries, But Same Hybrid War
Patrick Cockburn
How Iran-Backed Forces Are Taking Over Iraq
Jonathan Cook
Israel is Silencing the Last Voices Trying to Stop Abuses Against Palestinians
Jim Kavanagh
Trump’s Syrian See-Saw: From Pullout to Pillage
Susan Babbitt
Fidel, Three Years Later
Dean Baker
A Bold Plan to Strengthen and Improve Social Security is What America Needs
ADRIAN KUZMINSKI
Trump’s Crime Against Humanity
Victor Grossman
The Wall and General Pyrrhus
Yoko Liriano
De Facto Martial Law in the Philippines
Ana Paula Vargas – Vijay Prashad
Lula is Free: Can Socialism Be Restored?
Thomas Knapp
Explainer: No, House Democrats Aren’t Violating Trump’s Rights
Wim Laven
Serve With Honor, Honor Those Who Serve; or Support Trump?
Colin Todhunter
Agrarian Crisis and Malnutrition: GM Agriculture Is Not the Answer
Binoy Kampmark
Walls in the Head: “Ostalgia” and the Berlin Wall Three Decades Later
Akio Tanaka
Response to Pete Dolack Articles on WBAI and Pacifica
Nyla Ali Khan
Bigotry and Ideology in India and Kashmir: the Legacy of the Babri Masjid Mosque
Yves Engler
Canada Backs Coup Against Bolivia’s President
November 11, 2019
Aaron Goings, Brian Barnes, and Roger Snider
Class War Violence: Centralia 1919
Steve Early - Suzanne Gordon
“Other Than Honorable?” Veterans With “Bad Paper” Seek Long Overdue Benefits
Peter Linebaugh
The Worm in the Apple
Joseph Natoli
In the Looming Shadow of Civil War
Robert Fisk
How the Syrian Democratic Forces Were Suddenly Transformed into “Kurdish Forces”
Patrick Cockburn
David Cameron and the Decline of British Leadership
Naomi Oreskes
The Greatest Scam in History: How the Energy Companies Took Us All
Fred Gardner
Most Iraq and Afghanistan Vets now Regret the Mission
Howard Lisnoff
The Dubious Case of Washing Machines and Student Performance
Nino Pagliccia
The Secret of Cuba’s Success: International Solidarity
Binoy Kampmark
Corporate Mammon: Amazon and the Seattle Council Elections
Kim C. Domenico
To Overthrow Radical Evil, Part II: A Grandmother’s Proposal
Marc Levy
Veterans’ Day: Four Poems
Weekend Edition
November 08, 2019
Friday - Sunday
Paul Street
The Real Constitutional Crisis: The Constitution
Sarah Shenker
My Friend Was Murdered for Trying to Save the Amazon
Rob Urie
Left is the New Right, or Why Marx Matters
Andrew Levine
What Rises to the Level of Impeachability?
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Enter Sondland
Matthew Hoh
And the Armies That Remained Suffer’d: Veterans, Moral Injury and Suicide
Kirkpatrick Sale
2020: The Incipient Bet
Evaggelos Vallianatos
Growing Ecological Civilization in China
Conn Hallinan
Middle East: a Complex Re-alignment
Robert Hunziker
Ignoring Climate Catastrophes
Patrick Howlett-Martin
Repatriate the Children of the Jihad
Medea Benjamin - Nicolas J. S. Davies
Neoliberalism’s Children Rise Up to Demand Justice in Chile and the World
John McMurtry
From Canada’s Election to Public Action: Beyond the Moral Tumor of Alberta Tar-Sands
Pete Dolack
Pacifica’s WBAI Back on the Air But Fight for Non-Corporate Radio Continues
Steven Krichbaum
Eating the Amazon
FacebookTwitterRedditEmail