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Et Tu Obama?

Kingston, Jamaica.

My closest and dearest Black friends think I hate Obama, because I never miss a chance to share with them, his broken promises; that he, a Constitutional lawyer, is busy shredding the Constitution; a Nobel Peace Prize winner showing his true colors by running more wars, behind more regime-change, backing more coups than any of us can keep track of.

My friends, in the presence of whom I now fear to mention the name Obama, in order to avoid besmirching the status of “The First Black President”, are all wrong.  Hate is not to be squandered because it robs the soul of energy.

I don’t hate Obama.  I detest him.  Which is worse, because it carries a smidgen less bile while still sending that strong message that he should be detested for the program that he appears to be prosecuting for his handlers.

It doesn’t take intellectual brilliance to ask the question: What has he done for us lately?  Versus, What has he done for the powerful from Day 1?  What promises has he made, and which has he kept?

Some of my friends are alarmed that a Black man should be criticizing the Black President.  My friends ought to know that I have sufficient principle that if I have lambasted President Bush, why should I give President Obama a pass?  After all, I consider him far more dangerous than Bush could ever be, simply because he is far more intelligent.  Which is why I refer to him as “Bush on Steroids”.

The handlers who made him President are men who understood that a black President could do things that a white President wouldn’t dare contemplate.  This black President could, and did, kill Americans, including a 16-year-old, with drones in Yemen, while the Liberals who attacked Bush, to this day, remain silent.  Muzzled.

Weren’t we all surprised and, at the same time, confused when we heard that Obama had received the Nobel Prize?  For doing what, I suppose we all asked ourselves.  Then we rationalized that it would help him roll back the wars.  Yes, he could, we assured ourselves.

I refer you to this excerpt from his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech:

“Where force is necessary, we have a moral and strategic interest in binding ourselves to certain rules of conduct.  And even as we confront a vicious adversary that abides by no rules, I believe the United States of America must remain a standard bearer in the conduct of war.  That is what makes us different from those whom we fight.  That is a source of our strength.  That is why I prohibited torture.  That is why I ordered the prison at Guantanamo Bay closed.  And that is why I have reaffirmed America’s commitment to abide by the Geneva Conventions.  We lose ourselves when we compromise the very ideals that we fight to defend.  (Applause.)  And we honor — we honor those ideals by upholding them not when it’s easy, but when it is hard.”

According to the MailOnline

“Four years after Obama promised to close it Guantanamo Bay military prison will get $195.7 million in renovations and new construction.  My conclusion is that Obama would rather imprison men who, contrary to the US Constitution, have not been charged with any crime or been judged. He’d rather threaten the financial health of US citizens.”

Then he worked with Al Qaeda to overthrow and kill Gaddafi and is again backing Al Qaeda in Syria.  Last time I heard, he was fighting Al Qaeda, his main reason for being in Afghanistan.

But he’s not only engaged in destruction in the Middle East and Africa (only a black President could get away with introducing AFRICOM into Africa), but he is engaged in damaging the US as well.

On 20 January 2009, the day Obama took office, the national debt was $10.626 Trillion.  This February, the Bureau of Public Debt at the Treasury Department reported that the debt was now $16.7 Trillion, to be exact $16,687,289,180, 215.37.   The warmongers, Wall Street, the banks-too-big-to-fail got their cut, Homeland Security purchased 1.6 billion bullets (including outlawed hollow-pointed) presumably to fight a 20-year-war, if need be, against American citizens.  And now it is left to struggling citizens like me to pick up the pieces and, like Cypriots, pay the bill.

The US never fails to remind the world that their President is the most powerful man in the world (Hillary Clinton may soon change that), and in some ways, he is.  But the facts belie the myth.  Truth is that the President answers to powerful forces (I knew you’d ask me to name them) pulling the strings behind the curtain.  OK, I’ll name one: the CIA.  All right, I’ll name another: the FBI. I’m not a student of the history of Presidents in the United States, but I have often ventured to declare that President Barack Obama must be the worst president of all times.

I fear that the United States which had taken several steps forward before he became president (one of those steps allowed him, without producing a legitimate birth certificate, to become “The first black President”) may have already taken more steps backward, with several months left to regress even more.

Patrick Barr is a former journalist with The Daily Gleaner, in Kingston, Jamaica.  

 

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