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Nakba Sunday at Maroun al Ras

On the Lebanon-Palestine border

Maroun al Ras is a beautiful hillside Lebanese village on the border with Palestine. 63 years ago today its villagers lifted their lights to welcome ethnically cleansed Palestinians, who were part of the approximately 129,000 from 531 Zionist- pillaged and destroyed villages who sought temporary refuge in Lebanon. A similar number of Palestinian expellees entered Syria a few miles to the West and another half million were forced into Jordan and Gaza.

On Nakba (“Catastrophe”), Sunday May 15, 2011 Maroun al Ras welcomed approximately 27 per cent of all the Palestinian refugees in Lebanon, this time coming from the opposite direction heading back toward their homes in Palestine. Palestinians in Lebanon now number approximately 248,000, approximately half of whom live in 12 squalid camps and as many “gatherings”, although 423,000 remain registered with UNWRA.

The discrepancy in numbers is explained by the fact that Lebanon’s Palestinian refugees, without any of the most elementary civil rights, (contrary to conditions in any of the other 45 camps in the Middle East and in gross violation of international Law as well as Lebanon’s Constitution and bi-lateral and multilateral agreements,) tend to leave Lebanon to seek work, decent housing, and a better life whenever they are able to secure a visa to Europe or elsewhere.

For a majority of the more 72,000 ( some estimates this morning exceed 100,000 because many refugees and supporters traveled south independently and did not register or use provided transportation) arriving in more than 1200 buses & vans, and many on foot, from all the camps and corners of Lebanon, it was their first sighting of their country. Lebanon law has long prevented Palestinians from coming anywhere near the blue line to even look towards their stolen homes and lands or to cross the Litani River north of Tyre. This year, for one day only, the Lebanese authorities reluctantly decided not to interfere with this human rights endeavor.

For the teen-agers on the crowded bus I rode on from Shatila Camp, their parents and grandparents stories and descriptions of Palestine on the Internet was what they talked about.

? As we approached Maroun al Ras, some of them were anxious, others silent and reflective, and some, like many teenagers from my generation about to see the Beatles or Elvis were giddy and squealing as the bus rounded a bend in the road south of Aitayoun and we looked to the approaching hills. “Is that my country Palestine over there?,” Ahmad, a graduate in Engineering who was born in Shatila camp asked. “Nam Habibi!” (“Yes Dear!”) came the reply from the microphone of our “bus mother” gripping her clip board and checking the names to keep track of her flock. This bus seemed to inflate with delirium as we all smiled and shouted. Some of the passengers had prepared signs that read: “People want to return to Palestine,” inspired perhaps by the slogan made famous in Egypt and Tunisia, “People want the fall of the regime.”

The esprit was reminiscent of a Mississippi freedom ride James Farmer of CORE used to tell us about and I thought of Ben Gurion’s boast from 1948 that the old will die and the young will forget Palestine. The Zionist leader could not have been more mistaken. The old, many still vital and those who departed this life, continue to teach and inspire the young from their still remembered stories, guaranteeing that the dream of every Palestinian shall never die.

The organizers from the camps did a tremendous job, but no one could have anticipated the huge numbers who would participate in this truly historic and likely region changing event.

All the Palestinian organizations and factions were united for this project.

Hezbollah kept a low profile so as to keep the focus on the Nakba. However, when the organizers discovered a shortage of buses last week Hezbollah arranged for more, even bringing them in from Syria who themselves used more than 800 buses yesterday to take Palestinians from Syria’s 10 Palestinians camps, including Yarmouk, to the Syrian Golan border with occupied Palestine.

At certain points along the narrow and winding village roads in South Lebanon the convoy would pause and Hezbollah members would appear and distribute bottles of water, fresh croissants and large chocolate filled cookies. They also did traffic control work and provided civil defense and medical services as needed. One imagines it was their guys who erected the nifty new road signs throughout the South that showed the distance to Palestine with an arrow pointing toward Jerusalem. Whenever the buses would pass one of the signs that read in Arabic and English, for example, “Palestine: 23 km”, our bus would erupt in cheers.

The Mabarat Charity, founded by the late scholar Mohammad Hussein Fadallah, who was from the village of Bint Jbeil near Maron al Ras, and which charity operates several gas stations, the proceeds of which supports orphans, discounted gas on Nakba Day for the hundreds on buses & vans.

It is difficult to exaggerate the camaraderie, emotion and sheer power of the event. They came to renew their commitment and send the world a message that they are determined to return to their land no matter the sacrifices required. For some coming to see Palestine, including some of those who have been forced out of their homes and off their lands, 63 years ago, it appeared to be almost a sacred and religious act.

One man, who appeared to be in his 80’s stood not far from me and gazed toward his stolen land near Akka, seen in the distance. Suddenly he slumped to the ground. Two of us elevated his legs and tried to make him comfortable on the rocky ground until first aid arrived.

My best friend in Shatila camp, Zeinab Hajj, whose father walked from his village of Amouka near Safad as a child, stared toward Safad also visible in the distance. Tears ran down Zeinabs cheeks as she gazed at her village. It was a common sight among the old and the young. Even toddlers whose parents wanted them to witness and be part of this historic day appeared to grasp its solemnity and importance.

For the large American contingent and other international guests, it was a majestic and cherished experience observing Nakba Day 2011 at Maroun al Ras.

However as the world soon learned, 10 Palestinians were killed by Israeli snipers and more than 120 wounded, some critically. None of the demonstrators had weapons. Those murdered were all civilians from the camps and were shot in cold blood as they nonviolently as placed Palestinian flags at the fence and gave the peace and victory sign. After Israeli troops fired on them, some threw rocks at the soldiers.

Fortunately some lives were saved by a field hospital affiliated with the group, the Martyr Salah Ghandour Hospital, from nearby Bint Jbeil.

Meanwhile, Lebanon has filed a complaint against Israel with the UN Security Council calling on the Security Council to pressure Israel to stop its hostile and provocative policies against Lebanon and hold it accountable for killing civilians.

Hezbollah’s Secretary-General Hassas Nassrallah commended Lebanon’s Palestinians this morning as he explained his interpretation of Nakba Day 2011: “You do not accept a homeland other than Palestine, and so let no one fear naturalization in Lebanon because your firm decision is to return. Your loud and clear message to the enemy is that you are determined to liberate the land no matter what the sacrifices are; and the fate of this entity (enemy) is demise and that no initiatives, treaties or borders will protect it. Your return to Palestine is inalienable right, and its realization has become closer than any other time. “

Hassan Nassrallah’s words require that Lebanon’s next Parliament, with the full, active, direct, and unequivocal support of Hezbollah immediately repeal the racist and discriminatory 2001 law that outlaws home ownership for Palestinians in Lebanon and that Lebanon’s Palestinians be immediately granted the right to work just as all refugees do globally and all foreigners in Lebanon enjoy.

There must be no more resistance to Palestinians being granted the elementary right to work and to own a home. Yesterday at Maroun al Ras Lebanon’s Palestinians once again earned the right to live in dignity and care for their families until Return. As the Palestinians continue their struggle for elementary civil rights here in the inhumane camps of Lebanon, they and the advocates are heartened by Hassan Nassrallah words of a few hours ago: ?”We are with you, and by your side. We are happy for your happiness and sad for your sadness, we carry with you the same hopes and pains, and move on together in the path of resistance so that we continue our victories and liberate all our land and sanctities.

Hopefully Lebanon’s Palestinian refugees will after 63 years in Lebanon, be granted internationally mandated civil rights.

Franklin Lamb is doing research in Lebanon and is reachable at fplamb@gmail.com
 

 

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Franklin Lamb volunteers with the Lebanon, France, and USA based Meals for Syrian Refugee Children Lebanon (MSRCL) which seeks to provide hot nutritional meals to Syrian and other refugee children in Lebanon. http://mealsforsyrianrefugeechildrenlebanon.com. He is reachable c/o fplamb@gmail.com.

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