FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Postcard from … Futenma

by JON MITCHELL

Okinawans are nowhere to be seen at this summer’s U.S. military appreciation day at the Futenma air base.

This is shaping up to be the toughest year for Futenma Air Station since one of its helicopters crashed into a nearby university six years ago. That accident cemented calls to move the Marine Corps base from its current location in crowded Ginowan City to Henoko, a less populated area in the north of Okinawa island, Japan’s southernmost prefecture. As details slowly emerged of underhanded construction deals and the potential destruction of Henoko’s ecosystem, though, public dissatisfaction with the plan grew. The opposition Democratic Party of Japan took advantage of this mood when they came to power last year on a platform to scrap the proposed relocation and move the base elsewhere.

Soon after the new government took office, however, it revealed that it had no idea where to transfer Futenma. Almost daily, Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama and his cabinet came up with different  – and often contradictory – sites. Their approval rating plummeted 50 points, and Ginowan’s residents poured into the streets in a 90,000-person show of anger. In June, Hatoyama announced what everyone had realized long before – he was going to stick with the Henoko plan. Before he could be called to account, he resigned and left his Okinawa affairs minister to tour the island, apologizing to the local mayors for the government’s failure.

Throughout the kerfuffle, the U.S. military remained ominously quiet. But as the rainy season cleared and summer came to Okinawa, they made plans for the base’s annual Futenma Flightline Festival. Here was a perfect opportunity to open their gates to the public and heal the wounds of the past few months – a chance to prove that press reports about the base’s unpopularity had been exaggerated and local residents really did value the jobs and dollars brought by the several thousand military personnel.

Pulling out all the stops to recreate a little slice of America, Marine Corps Community Services set up pizza stalls and bouncy castles. There was a hotdog eating contest and residents had a chance to don a padded bomb suit that was able, according to its proud tech officer, to withstand the blast of a 100-pound artillery shell. Also on display were the latest jeeps, jets, and choppers – but there was one important weapon that the military had forgotten to roll out – its shiny, well-oiled PR machine.

When the base commander, Colonel Dale Smith, took the stage to deliver his welcome speech, there were no squads of Marines to oorah his arrival. Nor were there any cheering military spouses or eager members of Japanese-American friendship associations. On hand were only a couple of locals who chatted among themselves about the dance act scheduled to come next. This no-show was infinitely more embarrassing than a hail of eggs, boos, or shoes. As he brought his speech to a quick close, the sound of three people clapping made the abysmal turn-out all the starker.

A few moments later, I walked over to the colonel. Thinking he’d be thankful for some human contact, I shook his hand. When I mentioned Futenma’s recent troubles and commented that he must be excited about the upcoming move, though, his mood turned sour. If I wanted to talk politics, he said, I should make an appointment with his secretary.

Before I could even ask him about the morning’s TV reports that the new Prime Minister was already backpedalling on Hatoyama’s Henoko plan, the colonel was beating a path away from me through the deserted hamburger stalls.

Nearing the display of blast suits, he slowed his pace and seemed to study their thick protection, then gave his head a tiny shake – Futenma has claimed thicker scalps than his and it will take more than six inches of Kevlar to protect him from the future fall-out its relocation is sure to bring.

JON MITCHELL writes regularly for The Japan Times on Okinawan social issues. As well as contributing articles to Counterpunch and Japan Focus, he has also discussed Futenma’s relocation problems for Al Jazeera English. He can be reached at jon.w.mitchell@gmail.com

More articles by:
Weekend Edition
November 17, 2017
Friday - Sunday
Paul Street
Thank an Anti-War Veteran
Andrew Levine
What’s Wrong With Bible Thumpers Nowadays?
Jeffrey St. Clair - Alexander Cockburn
The CIA’s House of Horrors: the Abominable Dr. Gottlieb
Wendy Wolfson – Ken Levy
Why We Need to Take Animal Cruelty Much More Seriously
Mike Whitney
Brennan and Clapper: Elder Statesmen or Serial Fabricators?
David Rosen
Of Sex Abusers and Sex Offenders
Ryan LaMothe
A Christian Nation?
Dave Lindorff
Trump’s Finger on the Button: Why No President Should Have the Authority to Launch Nuclear Weapons
W. T. Whitney
A Bizarre US Pretext for Military Intrusion in South America
Deepak Tripathi
Sex, Lies and Incompetence: Britain’s Ruling Establishment in Crisis 
Howard Lisnoff
Who You’re Likely to Meet (and Not Meet) on a College Campus Today
Roy Morrison
Trump’s Excellent Asian Adventure
John W. Whitehead
Financial Tyranny
Ted Rall
How Society Makes Victimhood a No-Win Proposition
Jim Goodman
Stop Pretending the Estate Tax has Anything to do With Family Farmers
Thomas Klikauer
The Populism of Germany’s New Nazis
Murray Dobbin
Is Trudeau Ready for a Middle East war?
Jeiddy Martínez Armas
Firearm Democracy
Jill Richardson
Washington’s War on Poor Grad Students
Ralph Nader
The Rule of Power Over the Rule of Law
Justin O'Hagan
Capitalism Equals Peace?
Matthew Stevenson
Into Africa: From the Red Sea to Nairobi
Geoff Dutton
The Company We Sadly Keep
Evan Jones
The Censorship of Jacques Sapir, French Dissident
Linn Washington Jr.
Meek Moment Triggers Demands for Justice Reform
Gerry Brown
TPP, Indo Pacific, QUAD: What’s Next to Contain China’s Rise?
Robert Fisk
The Exile of Saad Hariri
Romana Rubeo - Ramzy Baroud
Anti-BDS Laws and Pro-Israeli Parliament: Zionist Hasbara is Winning in Italy
Robert J. Burrowes
Why are Police in the USA so Terrified?
Chuck Collins
Stop Talking About ‘Winners and Losers’ From Corporate Tax Cuts
Ron Jacobs
Private Property Does Not Equal Freedom
Kollibri terre Sonnenblume
Mass Shootings, Male Toxicity and their Roots in Agriculture
Binoy Kampmark
The Fordist Academic
Frank Scott
Weapons of Mass Distraction Get More Destructive
Missy Comley Beattie
Big Dick Diplomacy
Michael Doliner
Democracy, Real Life Acting and the Movies
Dan Bacher
Jerry Brown tells indigenous protesters in Bonn, ‘Let’s put you in the ground’
Winslow Myers
The Madness of Deterrence
Cesar Chelala
A Kiss is Not a Kiss: Sexual Abuse and Exploitation of Children
Jimmy Centeno
Garcia Meets Guayasamin: A De-Colonial Experience
Stephen Martin
When Boot Becomes Bot: Surplus Population and The Human Face.
Martin Billheimer
Homer’s Iliad, la primera nota roja
Louis Proyect
Once There Were Strong Men
Charles R. Larson
Review: Mike McCormack’s Solar Bones
David Yearsley
Academics Take Flight
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail