FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Do You Have "Shift Work Sleep Disorder"?

Do you work in customer service? Health care? The restaurant industry? You might be suffering fromshift work sleep disorder(SWSD) says a new ad campaign from Frazer, PA-based Cephalon who makes the Schedule IV stimulants Provigil and Nuvigil.  One out of four people working nontraditional schedules suffers from this hitherto unrecognized epidemic say radio ads which broke this week here in Chicago.

SWSD is characterized by trouble focusing, increased irritability and poor work performance — think ADHD — an accompanying web site, wakeupsquad.com, explains.  But don’t think the answer is renegotiating with your alarm clock. “Just improving your sleep may not improve your ability to cope with shift work,” says the site which offers a self-assessment quiz and chance to “take action” and “tell a friend” without saying what that action might be or what you are telling your friend. No drugs are mentioned.

Of course shift work sleep disorder is only one reason for the national epidemic of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). Other reasons are obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and narcolepsy —  Wink Wink — for which Cephalon’s drugs are also approved, non-restful sleep (NRS), restless legs syndrome (RLS) and middle-of-the-night insomnia (MOTN). You might also suffer from late night TV addiction syndrome (LNTVAS) or experience daytime sleepiness because –surprise — what you are doing and the people you are with are Boring. (The reason they say speed makes people more interesting.)

Then there’s all the people with sleepiness-from-treating-their-insomnia and insomnia-from-treating-their-sleepiness in a kind of pharmaceutical jet lag that began when insomnia meds like Ambien, Lunesta, Sonata and Rozerem first appeared on TV. Late night TV.

Sleeping pill hangovers are nothing new. In the 1950s and  1960s, barbiturates, immortalized in the movie the Valley of the Dolls and by Marilyn Monroe’s death, spawned a “bennie” or Benzedrine subculture to offset their effects. In 1993 the sleeping pill Halcion was banned in the UK and other countries for causing amnesia, paranoia, depression, hallucinations and violence in users. And in 2001, the related pill, Dalmane, was said to “increase the risk of an injurious accident more than five times normal,” at FDA/National Transportation Safety Board hearings.

And who can forget Rep. Patrick Kennedy (D-Rhode Island) driving to Capitol Hill to “vote” at 2:45 AM on Ambien and crashing his Ford Mustang in 2006? [Or the drowsy Tiger Woods, unable to focus properly on Elen’s initial commenatary on the Contacts she had found on hiscellphone. Editors.]

In addition to sleep driving and sleep walking, Ambien is indicted for sleep eating —  horrified dieters finding themselves surrounded by Haagen-Dazs empties consumed by their evil twin in a blackout.

Cephalon shouldn’t have a hard time convincing people they have shift work sleep disorder or excessive daytime sleepiness judging from all the unprescribed Adderall, Vyvanse, Ritalin and Strattera people are taking  — and the number of meth labs. Provigil “is increasingly being diverted for nonmedical use by healthy individuals with the expectation that it will improve cognitive performance,” says an article in the March 18, 2009 JAMA. An article this week in the Daily Northwestern, Northwestern University’s student paper, says college kids who’ve outgrown their ADHD can make a quick $300 a month flipping their Adderall and Concerta scripts on campus.

But the reason FDA rejected Provigil (modafinil) in 2006 for children with ADHD was not for its abuse potential but for its Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS) potential — a drug reaction so severe patients are treated in burn units and resemble Napalm victims.

Between 15 to 400 children were projected to die from SJS if Provigil (modafinil) were approved for ADHD in children at FDA advisory committee hearings in 2006 (attended by Joseph Biederman and Jorge Armenteros, later accused of drug industry conflicts of interest.) Provigil’s molecular cousin Nuvigil (armodafinil) was also rejected by the FDA as a jet lag drug in March.

Still, an ad for a clinical trial for “excessive sleepiness associated with narcolepsy” in this week’s University of Illinois student newspaper, The Flame, suggests that “Being sleepy throughout the day is more than just a nuisance, it’s a heavy burden,” and sleepy students might “suffer from Excessive Daytimes Sleepiness.”

They may even have Study Shift Sleep Disorder.

MARTHA ROSENBERG can be reached at: martharosenberg@sbcglobal.net

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WORDS THAT STICK

 

More articles by:

Martha Rosenberg is an investigative health reporter. She is the author of  Born With A Junk Food Deficiency: How Flaks, Quacks and Hacks Pimp The Public Health (Prometheus).

January 22, 2019
Patrick Cockburn
On the Brink of Brexit: the Only Thing Most People Outside Westminster Know About Brexit is That It’s a Mess
Raouf Halaby
The Little Brett Kavanaughs from Covington Catholic High
Dean Baker
The Trump Tax Cut is Even Worse Than They Say
Stanley L. Cohen
The Brazen Detention of Marzieh Hashemi, America’s Newest Political Prisoner
Karl Grossman
Darth Trump: From Space Force to Star Wars
Glenn Sacks
Teachers Strike Dispatch #8: New Independent Study Confirms LAUSD Has the Money to Meet UTLA’s Demands
Haydar Khan
The Double Bind of Human Senescence
Alvaro Huerta
Mr. President, We Don’t Need Your Stinking Wall
Howard Lisnoff
Another Slugger from Louisville: Muhammad Ali
Nicole Patrice Hill – Kollibri terre Sonnenblume
The Scarlet “I”: Climate Change, “Invasive” Plants and Our Culture of Domination
Jonah Raskin
Disposable Man Gets His Balls Back
Thomas Knapp
Now More Than Ever, It’s Clear the FBI Must Go
January 21, 2019
W. T. Whitney
New US Economic Attack Against Cuba, Long Threatened, May Hit Soon
Jérôme Duval
Macronist Repression Against the People in Yellow Vests
Dean Baker
The Next Recession: What It Could Look Like
Eric Mann
All Hail the Revolutionary King: Martin Luther King and the Black Revolutionary Tradition
Binoy Kampmark
Spy Theories and the White House: Donald Trump as Russian Agent
Edward Curtin
We Need a Martin Luther King Day of Truth
Bill Fried
Jeff Sessions and the Federalists
Ed Corcoran
Central America Needs a Marshall Plan
Colin Todhunter
Complaint Lodged with European Ombudsman: Regulatory Authorities Colluding with Agrochemicals Industry
Manuel E. Yepe
The US War Against the Weak
Weekend Edition
January 18, 2019
Friday - Sunday
Melvin Goodman
Star Wars Revisited: One More Nightmare From Trump
John Davis
“Weather Terrorism:” a National Emergency
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Sometimes an Establishment Hack is Just What You Need
Joshua Frank
Montana Public Schools Block Pro-LGBTQ Websites
Louisa Willcox
Sky Bears, Earth Bears: Finding and Losing True North
Robert Fisk
Bernie Sanders, Israel and the Middle East
Robert Fantina
Pompeo, the U.S. and Iran
David Rosen
The Biden Band-Aid: Will Democrats Contain the Insurgency?
Nick Pemberton
Human Trafficking Should Be Illegal
Steve Early - Suzanne Gordon
Did Donald Get The Memo? Trump’s VA Secretary Denounces ‘Veteran as Victim’ Stereotyping
Andrew Levine
The Tulsi Gabbard Factor
John W. Whitehead
The Danger Within: Border Patrol is Turning America into a Constitution-Free Zone
Dana E. Abizaid
Kafka’s Grave: a Pilgrimage in Prague
Rebecca Lee
Punishment Through Humiliation: Justice For Sexual Assault Survivors
Dahr Jamail
A Planet in Crisis: The Heat’s On Us
John Feffer
Trump Punts on Syria: The Forever War is Far From Over
Dave Lindorff
Shut Down the War Machine!
Glenn Sacks
LA Teachers’ Strike: Student Voices of the Los Angeles Education Revolt  
Mark Ashwill
The Metamorphosis of International Students Into Honorary US Nationalists: a View from Viet Nam
Ramzy Baroud
The Moral Travesty of Israel Seeking Arab, Iranian Money for its Alleged Nakba
Ron Jacobs
Allen Ginsberg Takes a Trip
Jake Johnston
Haiti by the Numbers
Binoy Kampmark
No-Confidence Survivor: Theresa May and Brexit
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail