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War Cries From a Defeated Man

Ritual trumphalism about America’s righteous mission in the closing sentences of his speech did not dispel the distinct impression during  President Obama’s  33-minute address to cadets at West Point Tuesday night that we were listening to  a man defeated by the challenge of justifying the dispatch of 3o,000 more troops to Afghanistan.  Contrary to the hackneyed  references to his “soaring rhetoric”,  the speech was earth-bound and mechanically delivered.

Obama didn’t make the case and he pleased few. The liberals seethed as they heard him say that it is “in our vital national interest” to send 30,000 more troops to a mission they regard as doomed from the getgo.
The cheers of the right at the news of the deployment died in their throats as they heard his next line, “After 18 months, our troops will begin to come home.”

No mature American, seasoned in the ineradicable graft flourishing down the decades in every major American city, believes a pledge that corruption will be banished from Afghanistan in a year and a half, or that Karzai has any credibility as the wielder of the cleansing broom.

Each proposition of Obama’s rationale collapses at the first prod, starting with the comparison with the conclusion of America’s mission in Iraq. It’s taken as axiomatic in Washington that the “surge” in Iraq worked – that the extra troops demanded of President Bush by General Petraeus turned the tide.

But what truly turned the tide in Iraq was the victory of the Shi’a in Baghdad and other major cities in their bloody civil war with the Sunni, the majority of whose fighters then saw they had alternative but to forge an alliance with the hated occupiers and garland the tanks they had been trying to blow up only weeks earlier.

Prime Minister Maliki has at his disposal a large and seemingly loyal army and extensive trained militia and police force to sustain  and guard the Iraqi state. The Afghan army is rag-tag, barely trained, mostly illiterate and rife with desertion – disproportionately manned and commanded by Tajiks whom the Pashtuns despise. The police depend for their living on bribes. As Professor Juan Cole points out, “the entire province of Qunduz north of the capital only has 800 police for a population of nearly a million. In contrast, the similarly-sized San Francisco has over 2,000 police officers and rather fewer armed militants.”

Core to Obama’s argument for intervention is the claim he made at West Point that the fundamental objective of  destroying  Al Qaida can only be achieved by destroying their hosts, the Taliban and that this enterprise requires more troops. But there is evidence that across the recent months of infighting over America’s options, Obama and his White House national security advisers themselves had no confidence in this proposition.
In the struggle between the White House and General McChrystal, the Pentagon and its Defense Secretary Robert Gates (a holdover from the Bush years)  Obama’s security adviser Gen. James  Jones mooted to Bob Woodward of the  Washington Post the question of why al Qaeda would want to move out of its present sanctuary in Pakistan to the uncertainties of Afghanistan.

McChrystal promptly struck back in his London speech to the Institute of Strategic Studies: “When  the Taliban has success, “that provides sanctuary from which al Qaeda can operate transnationally.”

Days later the New York Times reported that “senior administration officials” were saying privately that Obama’s national security team was now “arguing that the Taliban in Afghanistan do not pose a direct threat to the United States.”

Detailing this semi-covert struggle, the Washington-based national security analyst argued here on the CounterPunch site last Wednesday  that Obama was boxed in by an alliance of Gates and Secretary of State Clinton plus McChrystal and Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the  Joint Chiefs of Staff,  in “a textbook demonstration of how the national security apparatus ensures that its policy preference on issues of military force prevail in the White House.”

Though Porter makes a decent case, this is giving too much comfort to those disconsolate but ever hopeful liberals arguing that there really is a “good Obama” battling away against the darker forces. In a larger time-frame, if anyone boxed himself in on Afghanistan it was Obama who spent a lot of the campaign last year seeking to deflect McCain’s charges that he was a quitter on Iraq, by proclaiming that America’s true battlefield lay in Afghanistan.

There were other unusual down-key notes in the speech. Obama is probably the first president of the United States to declare flatly that “we can’t simply afford to ignore the price of these wars…That’s why our troop commitment in Afghanistan cannot be open- ended: because the nation that I’m most interested in building is our own.”

Contrast that to the budgetary bravado of President Kennedy proclaiming in his inaugural address in 1961 that “we shall pay any price, bear any burden … in order to assure the survival and the success of liberty.”

In the wake of the speech – particularly after polls showing that it had failed to increase prowar sentiment –  the Democrats were glum, well aware that they will be saddled with an unpopular war  through the 2010 midterm elections and that Obama will unhesitatingly turn to Republicans in Congress to get the necessary vote for the money to finance the widening war. From the left came pledges to revive the antiwar movement, dormant these past two years.

There are hurt cries from prominent pwogs such as Tom Hayden who now vows he will strip the  Obama sticker off his car. Maybe so.  Our sense here at CounterPunch is that Lady Macbeth would get those damned spots off her hands far quicker that American progressives will purge themselves of Obamaphilia.

At least the American political landscape is offering some pleasing spectacles.  On Wednesday came tidings of a right-left alliance in Congress, challenging the reappointment of Ben Bernanke for a second term as chairman of the Federal Reserve, a slap in the face not only for Bernanke but for Obama.

In demanding a hold on Bernanke’s reappointment, Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont said, “The American people overwhelmingly voted last year for a change in our national priorities to put the interests of ordinary people ahead of the greed of Wall Street and the wealthy few. What the American people did not bargain for was another four years for one of the key architects of the Bush economy.”

The president could scarcely exult publicly at one piece of good news, since it comes at the expense of the lives of four police officers, in Tacoma, Washington, shot dead by Maurice Clemmons, an apparent madman who had a very  lengthy prison sentence commuted nine years ago  by Mike Huckabee when the latter was governor of Arkansas.

Huckabee’s pardons were estimable and prompted praise from CounterPunch’s editors last year as unique exhibitions of courage in the grotesque penal climate in America today. To his credit Huckabee  is standing by his reason for pardoning Clemmons– that a ninety-plus year sentence had been a grotesque sentence to give a teenager. But the prospects of him winning the Republican nomination in 2012 have now shriveled, sparing Obama a witty and resourceful opponent.

Obama is no doubt  more comfortable with the thought that his opponent might conceivably be Sarah Palin, the woman who is the progressives’   alibi for not having to focus on  their  pathetic illusions about Obama.  He didn’t deceive them on the campaign trail, if they’d been ready to listen closely. He pledged a war in Afghanistan and now he’s cashing that promise. He didn’t fool them. They fooled themselves, a far more culpable offense.

The Culture of Cocaine

In our latest newsletter Forrest Hylton has a marvelous essay of the political and social role of the central commodity of our neoliberal age – cocaine and its down-market relative, crack.   He takes from the political economies of Latin America to the streets of New York.  Also in this terrific issue,  Peter Lee describes how the stage is set for Nepal’s Maoists to win state power. Aand you thought the Shining Path and Bob Avakian were marginal to the onward march of world revolution. The Nepalese Maoists have a different take, as Lee describes.   And there’s more in the newsletter. Niranjan Ramakrishnan asks a big question, What is a “true Muslim”? Men who throw acid in women’s faces? No-oo-oo. A man who shouts Allahu akbar! and opens fire at Fort Hood? Nooo-oooo-ooo. Who? Read Niranjan.

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Thank You Again, CounterPunchers

Still the support rolls in. Day after day last month  you looked at our annual appeal, and day after day scores of you went on line and sent us donations. Others of you mailed in checks and continue to do so. Every dollar makes us stronger. All of us here thank you.

What better way to celebrate this vital infusion as we head towards 2010 than to get a copy of the Country Mamas 2010 calendar supervised  into triumphant production by our Business Manager, Becky Grant, whose idea it was from the start.  You can see the cover photo right here on the home page, three down on the right hand side.It’s already a big hit with CounterPunchers.

So order up this fresh recruit to the great tradition of America’s country calendars. Who could be more beautiful than the women of the Mattole Valley, proud and happy to decorate a kitchen wall with this zestful march of the months!

ALEXANDER COCKBURN can be reached at alexandercockburn@asis.com

More articles by:

Alexander Cockburn’s Guillotined! and A Colossal Wreck are available from CounterPunch.

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