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Inside Iran’s Most Infamous Prison

by REZA YAVARI

Many persons who protested the results of Iran’s July election were arrested and sent into an infamous prison called Kahrizak, located south of Tehran, opened two years ago as a “temporary” facility and ordered closed two weeks ago by direct orders of Khamenei. —- Editors.

Ido not know where to begin! Forgive me if the report I would like to give of the Iranian Guantanamo, the Kahrizak Camp, will have any grammatical and  spelling errors, because I am in a hurry and must leave soon.  It is currently 8 in the morning, 6th of Mordad (26th of July) as I write this. This morning, along a few others, I was able to escape certain death miraculously.  I just arrived home from the hospital. I was arrested on 18th of Tir (9th July) . I am 21 years old. Even as I  write this I am in disbelief about my release.

In the Tir 18th protests my  friend and I were beaten by plain clothed agents while we were on a motorcycle with my friend filming with his cell phone. A woman came to save us  from the hands of these people but they even beat that poor person up as well.  They threw us in a mini-bus filled with people hurt and beaten just like us. The mini-bus took us to a police station. We were beaten so much that we did not know where we were. They put us next to a wall and my friend and I were standing  next to each other. Then a bulky plain clothed agent came and selected every second person and forced us into the mini-bus. I have not heard any news of my  friend from that moment on.

They took me along with tens of others to a camp at Kahrizak. There were at least 200 of us in the room they took us to. Everybody was injured. The sound of groaning from pain filled the room. I wondered to myself what  they planned to do to us.  Maybe tomorrow they would us to a court or prison, which would at least be  much better than where we were right now. There was no place to sit. The doors and walls were covered with blood. I was thinking about my friend, because  he was not the type to have any tolerance for such places. In the midst of this all those in the room began to weep and cry, and someone said that someone had just died.  The voice was coming from the end of the room but we were all crammed up against one another and could not move. Plain clothed guards entered  the room, shattered the light bulbs and began to beat everyone in complete darkness. They hit anyone they saw in front of them. We were beaten for a good half an hour. A few went into coma and may have even died from the intensity of  the beatings. They then shone flash lights in our faces and said “if you  let out any sound we will stick these batons….”

Sadegh, who seemed to be of higher rank took the dead  body and laid it against the wall, shone a flashlight in his face and said, “We  have warrant to kill you all. So you better wish for some luck and not end up  like this mother….dead.” “…Don’t let out the slightest sound. If you stay alive until morning you stay alive…” He then continued, “you are all muharebe [combatants], do you know what a muharebe is.” He grabbed someone from the front  who seemed to be a 16-17 year old boy by the neck and said, “tell them what  Muharebe means!” the boy said he did not know. The man then responded “the hell  you don’t!” and began to beat him ruthlessly while saying “ tell them, tell  them!” He beat him to the point that the boy was unconscious. He continued to  say Muharebe means Satan, means wrong doer. He beat the boy so hard that some  begin to voice their anger, but were also beaten ruthlessly. In that  room of ours at least four people were killed before morning. Sadegh said in  a loud voice, “there is no such thing as a toilet and tooth brush here, you do  your business right here, are we clear?” There was not a single uninjured  person among us, they all either had blood clotted on their faces or their eyes  had been bruised like mine.  And many others had broken arms and legs. It  was completely dark. Our eyes would become extremely irritated from the light every time they opened the door.

The next days we spent terrible conditions. We could not tell night from day, and in order to prevent us from  starving to death they threw us a sack filled with leftovers every day which we  ate eagerly. In this sack there was some left-over bread, greens, and rice and was spread among us by an individual named Dr. Zare, who said he  was a doctor and responsible for distributing food. For several days I could only hear the his voice of him and of numerous other prisoners and I could recognize  them from their voices until one day Sadegh came and brought some light bulbs. After several days we were allowed to go in the outside area of the camp. Oh what sense of freedom we found this to be. The blue sky and the sun light were refreshing for us.  (In addition I should mention that the reason they  brought us out was for us to clean out our filth and feces.) I apologize for writing in such manner, but in a few more days when others are freed, especially  those from the Kahrizak camp, will be able to provide you with better details,  which I am certain has Guantanamo and Abu Gharib beat in certain respects  these  past few days. Anyway according to a few of Sadegh’s thugs we were some of  the first people to be thrown out of the camp due to it being over  crowded. And they threatened us that they will kill us if we speak a word about what happened there. It was around midnight last night when I immediately  contacted my family with somebody’s cell phone and had them pick me up.

Freedom tastes sweet.  But keep in mind that there are thousands of people  going through under the worst conditions at Kahrizak camp. In addition I have memorized and will say the names of those who lost their lives just in our camp while I was there. If these animals had taken these people to  the hospital they might have stayed alive today. Hassan Shamloo (student), Reza Fatahi (student) Milad with unknown last name, the 17-year old who was kicked and punched by Sadegh on the first night and went into a  coma, and was taken away. Our doctor prisoner said he bled from his ear and mouth and had died. Morteza, Salahshoor, Morad, Aghassi, Mohsen,   Entezami. In addition I also have the names of several of those arrested in  our camp which I will also list in the coming days. Dear god  please free us from the evil of these people. I cannot believe where I was 24  hours ago. Dear god, save all Iranians and freedom seekers as quick as  possible. Also with the changes that have occurred in Kahrizak camp, the  detention center that our corrupt leader is supposed to shut down is probably Kahrizak, because a lot of people were killed in it. REZA YAVARI (my  alias) Mordad 6th 1:10am.     With the hope of freedom for those imprisoned in  Kahrizak.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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