FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Netanyahu’s Time Bomb

The public disagreement between Israel and the U.S. over continued settlement expansion in the West Bank and Jerusalem has heated up considerably. At a cabinet meeting on Sunday, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu publicly rejected the Obama administration’s request for a halt to construction of a planned settlement in Sheik Jarrah, located in Israeli-occupied East Jerusalem.

The disputed site is owned by billionaire and settlement supporter Irving Moskowitz who bought the property in 1985. Mr. Moskowitz hopes to construct 20 residence units at what is currently the site of the Shepherd’s Hotel. The location was once used as a residence by the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin al-Husseini. It was also was once the home of author and Palestinian nationalist, George Antonius. The location borders an historic and wealthy Palestinian neighborhood which has many opulent villas. The proposed building site was described at the Israeli (Hebrew) Channel One web site as a “ticking time bomb since 1985.” The municipality of Jerusalem has prevented the development of the site because of Palestinian sensibilities until recently.

During Benjamin Netanyahu’s previous tenure as Prime Minister, two long-contemplated controversial construction projects in East Jerusalem were begun despite intense Palestinian and international protest. The first was the opening of an exit for a tunnel to the Muslim quarter near the Via Dolorosa which runs under the Haram-al-Sharif or the Temple Mount. The second was the construction of a Jewish settlement on Jabal Abu Ghneim or Har Homa on a hill overlooking the city which is located in Israeli-occupied territory.

Despite delays caused by opponents, these projects have been completed as planned. Today the excavated tunnel is one of the most popular Jerusalem tourist attractions, where visitors can use the once controversial Via Dolorosa exit to enter the Arab market located in the Muslim quarter. Jabal Abu Ghneim is today the site of an Israeli settlement containing 4000 housing units. It is difficult for many to recall that in 1997 the General Assembly voted 132 to 3 to recommend a halt to construction of the settlement. The countries that voted against the resolution were Israel, the United States, and Micronesia.

The opening of the tunnel exit (and the tunnel excavation) and the building of the Jewish settlement on Jabal Abu Ghneim were both delayed by previous Israeli administrations, at least, partially because of the many legitimate Palestinian concerns. Benjamin Netanyahu ignored these concerns which resulted in rioting and international condemnation. Now in his second turn as Prime Minister Netanyahu has again chosen to ignore Palestinian sensitivities and international opinion. His government has decided to allow construction of settler residences at the site known to the Palestinians as Karm al-Mufti (Vineyard of the Mufti) when previous Israeli governments have refrained from doing. This new settlement is only a fraction of the size of the one built on Jabal Abu Ghneim and is not as strategically located. The planned construction site, although historic, is not nearly as sensitive as the tunnel construction which caused significant danger to the structure of the Haram (Mosque Compound) which is located above it.

What makes construction at the Shepherd’s Hotel site so controversial is that it demonstrates Israel’s policy of not only generally rejecting the U.S. request to cease building in the territories, but also to refuse a U.S. plea to halt a building at a specific site. An entreaty to stop the planned building on the property was delivered to Israeli Ambassador Michael Oren by State Department officials within the last few days. According to Ha’aretz, Oren told the Americans that Jerusalem is no different than any other part of his country and that Israel would not accede to their demand.

In his speech to the cabinet on Sunday, Netanyahu declared, “Jerusalem is united, it is the capital of the Jewish people, and its sovereignty is not open to debate.” He further added that any Jew has the right to build anywhere in Jerusalem. The Prime Minister’s statement received support from opposition member of parliament Yoel Hasoon (Kadima), who said,”the American request to refrain from building in Jerusalem is not legitimate. Jerusalem is the capital of Israel and the Jewish people, and is not a settlement….”

Further evidence that Israel and the United States are far from resolving settlement expansion dispute was the postponement of this week’s scheduled meeting between Special Envoy George Mitchell and Defense Minister Ehud Barak. There has been no official confirmation of when the next meeting between the two will occur.

Benjamin Netanyahu’s refusal to obey the U.S. demand to halt construction in East Jerusalem and in the “settlement blocs” has wide support among Israelis, who are mostly dug in against what they consider a betrayal by the Americans. Even politicians that are against the occupation have not spoken out in behalf of the Obama demand for a settlement freeze, according to Israeli journalist Aluf Benn. But if the Americans want to be a credible force for peace in Israel/Palestine it is important that they hold firm on their demand that Israel cease all settlement construction in all of the West Bank including Jerusalem. Each new Israeli structure designated “for Jews only ” prejudices a future settlement and makes a mockery of the “peace process.”

As the journalist and blogger Philip Weiss wrote about the confrontation over Karm al-Mufti, “Isn’t this the whole enchilada? Isn’t this what Obama promised in his Cairo speech, a shared Jerusalem? Harvard professor and blogger Stephen Walt wrote me a couple days ago that he thought that Obama and Netanyahu “are headed for an eyeball to eyeball situation, and …[he has]… no idea who will blink first.” Who knows, maybe thist is the confrontation Walt just predicted.

IRA GLUNTS first visited the Middle East in 1972, where he taught English and physical education in a small rural community in Israel. He was a volunteer in the Israeli Defense Forces in 1992. Mr. Glunts lives in Madison, New York where he operates a used and rare book business. Mr. Glunts can be reached at gluntsi[at]morrisville[dot]edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More articles by:

IRA GLUNTS first visited the Middle East in 1972, where he taught English and physical education in a small rural community in Israel. He was a volunteer in the Israeli Defense Forces in 1992. Mr. Glunts is a Jewish American who lives in Madison, New York. He owns and operates a used and rare book business and is a part-time reference librarian. Mr. Glunts can be reached at gluntsi[at]morrisville[dot]edu.

July 23, 2018
Thomas Mountain
Ethiopia’s Peaceful Revolution
Weekend Edition
July 20, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Paul Atwood
Peace or Armageddon: Take Your Pick
Paul Street
No Liberal Rallies Yet for the Children of Yemen
Nick Pemberton
The Bipartisan War on Central and South American Women
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Are You Putin Me On?
Andrew Levine
Sovereignty: What Is It Good For? 
Brian Cloughley
The Trump/NATO Debacle and the Profit Motive
David Rosen
Trump’s Supreme Pick Escalates America’s War on Sex 
Melvin Goodman
Montenegro and the “Manchurian Candidate”
Salvador Rangel
“These Are Not Our Kids”: The Racial Capitalism of Caging Children at the Border
Matthew Stevenson
Going Home Again to Trump’s America
Louis Proyect
Jeremy Corbyn, Bernie Sanders and the Dilemmas of the Left
Patrick Cockburn
Iraqi Protests: “Bad Government, Bad Roads, Bad Weather, Bad People”
Robert Fantina
Has It Really Come to This?
Russell Mokhiber
Kristin Lawless on the Corporate Takeover of the American Kitchen
John W. Whitehead
It’s All Fake: Reality TV That Masquerades as American Politics
Patrick Bobilin
In Your Period Piece, I Would be the Help
Ramzy Baroud
The Massacre of Inn Din: How Rohingya Are Lynched and Held Responsible
Robert Fisk
How Weapons Made in Bosnia Fueled Syria’s Bleak Civil War
Gary Leupp
Trump’s Helsinki Press Conference and Public Disgrace
Josh Hoxie
Our Missing $10 Trillion
Martha Rosenberg
Pharma “Screening” Is a Ploy to Seize More Patients
Basav Sen
Brett Kavanaugh Would be a Disaster for the Climate
David Lau
The Origins of Local AFT 4400: a Profile of Julie Olsen Edwards
Rohullah Naderi
The Elusive Pursuit of Peace by Afghanistan
Binoy Kampmark
Shaking Establishments: The Ocasio-Cortez Effect
John Laforge
18 Protesters Cut Into German Air Base to Protest US Nuclear Weapons Deployment
Christopher Brauchli
Trump and the Swedish Question
Chia-Chia Wang
Local Police Shouldn’t Collaborate With ICE
Paul Lyons
YouTube’s Content ID – A Case Study
Jill Richardson
Soon You Won’t be Able to Use Food Stamps at Farmers’ Markets, But That’s Not the Half of It
Kevin MacKay
Climate Change is Proving Worse Than We Imagined, So Why Aren’t We Confronting its Root Cause?
Thomas Knapp
Elections: More than Half of Americans Believe Fairy Tales are Real
Ralph Nader
Warner Slack—Doctor for the People Forever
Lee Ballinger
Soccer, Baseball and Immigration
Louis Yako
Celebrating the Wounds of Exile with Poetry
Ron Jacobs
Working Class Fiction—Not Just Surplus Value
Perry Hoberman
You Can’t Vote Out Fascism… You Have to Drive It From Power!
Robert Koehler
Guns and Racism, on the Rocks
Nyla Ali Khan
Kashmir: Implementation with Integrity and Will to Resolve
Justin Anderson
Elon Musk vs. the Media
Graham Peebles
A Time of Hope for Ethiopia
Kollibri terre Sonnenblume
Homophobia in the Service of Anti-Trumpism is Still Homophobic (Even When it’s the New York Times)
Martin Billheimer
Childhood, Ferocious Sleep
David Yearsley
The Glories of the Grammophone
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail