The Unemployment Channel

Ah, the common folk.  How we do pile up.  Come May Day 2009 there will be about 14 million unemployed, twice the seven million who were unemployed in June of 2007.

Speaking about this on the stock market channel—which I have been watching lately the way I used to watch the weather channel back in the 90s–they call unemployment a lagging indicator.  On the stock market channel they have their eyes always on the stock prices, which crash before the people do, and which consequently qualifies unemployment as not only post hoc to stock prices but propter.

So what we need as an immediate federal jobs program is a labor channel called Countrywide Unemployment (CU) where unemployed people can get paid for some honest reporting on what a lagging indicator looks like when you keep your eye on it.

The incentive to the employer community would be that a voice on the unemployment channel would agree to leave the air when presented with a competitive labor contract for a term of 18 months or a length of time equal to the average recession, whichever is longer.

The only advertisements allowed at the CU network would be for employment, education, or the kinds of cultural events that could be considered unemployment friendly, certainly not the Super Bowl.  Any other crap you want to sell goes to Google ads at the network website.
But in no event will credit card companies be allowed to advertise unless they agree on pain of nationalization to lend at prime plus nada for the life of the cardholder.

There should be regional bureaus set up in RVs and parked outside important places like the White House, Congress, State Capitols, Regional Federal Reserve Banks, and rotating on a regular basis to various network places and research parks where venture capitalists may be found.

Now in recognition of the fact that youth get systematically screwed when it comes to the unemployment rate, one desk at the unemployment network would be dedicated to coverage of the Unemployed Peoples Youth Resource Service (UPYRS).

The UPYRS program would accept proposals on a weekly basis from youth who have shovel-ready ideas for community improvement.  They would pinpoint something that they are tired of seeing neglected and their proposals would be put up for vote at the network’s website and hooked into Twitter and so forth.

A camera crew in each city would be assigned to follow the winning team of the week as members of the team receive full salaries and funding, purchase equipment and supplies, and get the work done in an entertaining and uplifting youthful manner, improving the community, the economy and their own prospects for saving memories of happy and productive lives.

Upon completion of the project each team member would receive a compensation bonus bond in the form of a T-Bill denominated for effective participation in the patriotic agenda known as “quantitative easing.”

This whole operation could be geared up in about an afternoon as soon as the Fox Network is nationalized and placed under an advisory council of cable access producers from across the country.
The founding annual budget should be a modest $5 billion funded directly by the Federal Reserve Board under discretionary powers delegated to the US Central Bank.  The fund will be called Talented Access Living Live (TALL).  The Philly Fed should have the TALL cash Fed-Exed to Fox Headquarters by noon, although stipulation could be made for a boxcar of gold bullion in case the Philly Fed is temporarily out of paper.

If there is any trouble getting this whole network up and running by midnight, then fourteen million unemployed should go milling around the Wall Street sector of Manhattan until the last of their lagging indications gets reabsorbed into a business plan.

GREG MOSES is editor of TexasWorker.org.  He can be reached at gmosesx@gmail.com.

More articles by:

Greg Moses writes about peace and Texas, but not always at the same time. He is author of Revolution of Conscience: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Philosophy of Nonviolence. As editor of the Texas Civil Rights Review he has written about racism faced by Black agriculturalists in Texas. He can be reached at gmosesx@gmail.com

Weekend Edition
March 16, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Michael Uhl
The Tip of the Iceberg: My Lai Fifty Years On
Bruce E. Levine
School Shootings: Who to Listen to Instead of Mainstream Shrinks
Mel Goodman
Caveat Emptor: MSNBC and CNN Use CIA Apologists for False Commentary
Paul Street
The Obama Presidency Gets Some Early High Historiography
Kathy Deacon
Me, My Parents and Red Scares Long Gone
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Rexless Abandon
Andrew Levine
Good Enemies Are Hard To Find: Therefore Worry
Jim Kavanagh
What to Expect From a Trump / Kim Summit
Ron Jacobs
Trump and His Tariffs
Joshua Frank
Drenched in Crude: It’s an Oil Free For All, But That’s Not a New Thing
Gary Leupp
What If There Was No Collusion?
Matthew Stevenson
Why Vietnam Still Matters: Bernard Fall Dies on the Street Without Joy
Robert Fantina
Bad to Worse: Tillerson, Pompeo and Haspel
Brian Cloughley
Be Prepared, Iran, Because They Want to Destroy You
Richard Moser
What is Organizing?
Scott McLarty
Working Americans Need Independent Politics
Rohullah Naderi
American Gun Violence From an Afghan Perspective
Sharmini Peries - Michael Hudson
Why Trump’s Tariff Travesty Will Not Re-Industrialize the US
Ted Rall
Democrats Should Run on Impeachment
Robert Fisk
Will We Ever See Al Jazeera’s Investigation Into the Israel Lobby?
Kristine Mattis
Superunknown: Scientific Integrity Within the Academic and Media Industrial Complexes
John W. Whitehead
Say No to “Hardening” the Schools with Zero Tolerance Policies and Gun-Toting Cops
Edward Hunt
UN: US Attack On Syrian Civilians Violated International Law
Barbara Nimri Aziz
Iraq Outside History
Wilfred Burchett
Vietnam Will Win: The Long Hard Road
Victor Grossman
Germany: New Faces, Old Policies
Medea Benjamin - Nicolas J. S. Davies
The Iraq Death Toll 15 Years After the US Invasion
Binoy Kampmark
Amazon’s Initiative: Digital Assistants, Home Surveillance and Data
Chuck Collins
Business Leaders Agree: Inequality Hurts The Bottom Line
Jill Richardson
What We Talk About When We Talk About “Free Trade”
Eric Lerner – Jay Arena
A Spark to a Wider Fire: Movement Against Immigrant Detention in New Jersey
Negin Owliaei
Teachers Deserve a Raise: Here’s How to Fund It
Kollibri terre Sonnenblume
What to Do at the End of the World? Interview with Climate Crisis Activist, Kevin Hester
Kevin Proescholdt
Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke Attacks America’s Wilderness
Franklin Lamb
Syrian War Crimes Tribunals Around the Corner
Beth Porter
Clean Energy is Calling. Will Your Phone Company Answer?
George Ochenski
Zinke on the Hot Seat Again and Again
Lance Olsen
Somebody’s Going to Extremes
Robert Koehler
Breaking the Ice
Pepe Escobar
The Myth of a Neo-Imperial China
Graham Peebles
Time for Political Change and Unity in Ethiopia
Terry Simons
10 American Myths “Refutiated”*
Thomas Knapp
Some Questions from the Edge of Immortality
Louis Proyect
The 2018 Socially Relevant Film Festival
David Yearsley
Keaton’s “The General” and the Pernicious Myths of the Heroic South