FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

The Lost Art of Shattuck

We awoke to a pile of feathers a few weeks ago up on Black Mountain. Faik had decided to stop offering protection to the chickens because they were no longer laying eggs. Instinctually the chickens roosted on the porch. But without wire to separate them from the brutal forces of nature, one of the hens didn’t make it. The bobcat didn’t care if it produced eggs or not. It’s life in the food chain in the forest hills of the Bay Area.

Two nights previous Mike and I wandered the avenues of Berkeley, walking miles down Shattuck to the Starry Plough to view some good old-fashioned Irish resistance art. Unfortunately the walls were crisscrossed with wooden beams so the old brick building would be able to survive another set of tremors, and the art suffered the brunt of this project.

We settled for a popular pool hall, where much of Berkley’s suburban youth was quietly shooting some stick. Roselle told me there was life somewhere in this coffee-drinking town and we set out for a bar he really liked under a freeway underpass three miles away. By the time we got there, it must have been 11:30, the bar was closed. So we walked back.

Life was spotted the next morning at the French Hotel. An exuberant crowd sipped coffee proudly from brightly-colored cups. Locals would later defend their turf saying that Berkeley was a house-party town, not a bar town.

We found a party the next day across the bridge.

The drinking started innocently enough with a beer or two in the Buddha Bar in Chinatown. It was enough to get Mike fired up for a hike out to North Beach to visit an Italian joint, Gino and Carlo’s, where he liked to shoot pool. We had come to the city for a Lowbagger Christmas type function to mingle with area activists. But midway through the afternoon would find us in the Saloon in San Francisco’s beatnik backways.

“Get back over here I’m gonna kick your ass!” screams a scrawny beatnik out the door to a guy he had just finished drinking with.

Corner bars bring that sort of thing out in a fellah.

Mike and I mosey on.

Nothing had changed much at Spec’s. I did manage to offend the bartender when I told him I was sick of drinking Anchor Steam. Still we had fun with the chap as the after work crowd slowlystarted to filter in and Mike recounted surviving the 1989 earthquake next to the glow of hurricane lanterns on the very bar we sat at.

Finally we make it back toward the financial district and find our side-street German pub where we plan to meet our Lowbagger friends for celebration. They come wandering in one by one. Cool cats for sure. That San Francisco crowd has the brains and connections to get a lot of good work done. And the ever important money. But they still have to live on top of one another. So we will continue to tell them stories of Montana’s endangered wide-open spaces. And just how muddy it is out here when it’s not unbearably damn cold.

The party petered out to a high-rise strip-mall joint, some old bears growling around a roundtable. Hoffman came to the rescue pulling Mike and I from the financial district, and after a short subway ride we were eating some fine authentic tacos with the hombres of the Mission neighborhood at El Taco Loco. After a short stop at a decent doof bar Mike and I were back on the BART zipping under the bay.

We figured that the night had to be finished. But, what the hell. On a whim we got off the train in downtown Oakland and wandered around for awhile. Mike showed me Hayes’ old office. Then we found the punk rock bar.

We cleared security after they made sure Mike wasn’t a cop. Enter the smoky haze of Oakland’s punk rock scene. People were wasted. Women clad in black were propping themselves up with bar stools. Giant speakers churned out deafeningly loud music. Hair crested skyward in various points and angles. True culture. Punk rock is not a crime. But some of that eye-shadow should be.

Mike and I have been through a lot. But I think it was the first time I had ever seen him head bang, for lack of a better word, to NOFX’s 13 Stitches. Mike soon gained the trust of the counter-culture and cigarettes burned like primitive bonfires in the mouths of the punk rockers. We were in California. Some people can smoke pot in that state, but tobacco is a ticket straight to hell. I felt kinda bad for those punk-rock kids, hidden away like some Swing Kids in Nazi Germany. Still they kept the home fire burning. Finally we had found some resistance performance art in a no name bar among the sleeping skyscrapers of downtown Oakland.

I didn’t want to go.

But Faik was waiting. He had been kind enough to awake at Mike’s call, borrow a car and drive from Berkeley down into Oakland to find us. We left the blare of the music and hit the crisp surface streets. A cold snap gripped the area and it felt good to suck up some fresh air. Before long we were back to the quiet coffee-shop neighborhoods, and crept into Mike’s gracious hosts’ house. Mike has brought enough people to stay at my place that he now let’s me crash on other people’s couches. A bittersweet Lowbagger rule.

I drifted off with thoughts of Faik’s California wilderness outpost on Black Mountain where we would head early the next morning. He was upset about his chickens. They weren’t laying eggs.

JOSH MAHAN edits Lowbagger.org, the web’s most un-PC environmental rag. He can be reached at: editor@lowbagger.org

 

 

More articles by:

Weekend Edition
February 15, 2019
Friday - Sunday
Matthew Hoh
Time for Peace in Afghanistan and an End to the Lies
Chris Floyd
Pence and the Benjamins: An Eternity of Anti-Semitism
Rob Urie
The Green New Deal, Capitalism and the State
Jim Kavanagh
The Siege of Venezuela and the Travails of Empire
Paul Street
Someone Needs to Teach These As$#oles a Lesson
Andrew Levine
World Historical Donald: Unwitting and Unwilling Author of The Green New Deal
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Third Rail-Roaded
Eric Draitser
Impacts of Exploding US Oil Production on Climate and Foreign Policy
Ron Jacobs
Maduro, Guaidó and American Exceptionalism
John Laforge
Nuclear Power Can’t Survive, Much Less Slow Climate Disruption
Joyce Nelson
Venezuela & The Mighty Wurlitzer
Jonathan Cook
In Hebron, Israel Removes the Last Restraint on Its Settlers’ Reign of Terror
Ramzy Baroud
Enough Western Meddling and Interventions: Let the Venezuelan People Decide
Robert Fantina
Congress, Israel and the Politics of “Righteous Indignation”
Dave Lindorff
Using Students, Teachers, Journalists and other Professionals as Spies Puts Everyone in Jeopardy
Kathy Kelly
What it Really Takes to Secure Peace in Afghanistan
Brian Cloughley
In Libya, “We Came, We Saw, He Died.” Now, Maduro?
Nicky Reid
The Councils Before Maduro!
Gary Leupp
“It’s All About the Benjamins, Baby”
Jon Rynn
What a Green New Deal Should Look Like: Filling in the Details
David Swanson
Will the U.S. Senate Let the People of Yemen Live?
Dana E. Abizaid
On Candace Owens’s Praise of Hitler
Raouf Halaby
‘Tiz Kosher for Elected Jewish U.S. Officials to Malign
Rev. William Alberts
Trump’s Deceitful God-Talk at the Annual National Prayer Breakfast
W. T. Whitney
Caribbean Crosswinds: Revolutionary Turmoil and Social Change 
ADRIAN KUZMINSKI
Avoiding Authoritarian Socialism
Howard Lisnoff
Anti-Semitism, Racism, and Anti-immigrant Hate
Ralph Nader
The Realized Temptations of NPR and PBS
Cindy Garcia
Trump Pledged to Protect Families, Then He Deported My Husband
Thomas Knapp
Judicial Secrecy: Where Justice Goes to Die
Louis Proyect
The Revolutionary Films of Raymundo Gleyzer
Sarah Anderson
If You Hate Campaign Season, Blame Money in Politics
Victor Grossman
Contrary Creatures
Tamara Pearson
Children Battling Unhealthy Body Images Need a Different Narrative About Beauty
Peter Knutson
The Salmon Wars in the Pacific Northwest: Banning the Rough Customer
Binoy Kampmark
Means of Control: Russia’s Attempt to Hive Off the Internet
Robert Koehler
The Music That’s in All of Us
Norah Vawter
The Kids Might Save Us
Tracey L. Rogers
Freedom for All Begins With Freedom for the Most Marginalized
Paul Armentano
Marijuana Can Help Fight Opioid Abuse
Tom Clifford
Britain’s Return to the South China Sea
Graham Peebles
Young People Lead the Charge to Change the World
Matthew Stevenson
A Pacific Odyssey: Around General MacArthur’s Manila Stage Set
B. R. Gowani
Starbucks Guy Comes Out to Preserve Billionaire Species
David Yearsley
Bogart Weather
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail