FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Post-Campaign Ad Stress Disorder

In the last one or two months, the person has been exposed, via television, to at least one of the following:

1. unremitting campaign attack ads,

2. intentionally obtuse or confusing campaign ads,

3. campaign ads intended to manipulate fears and emotions, deeply insulting the integrity and intellect of the viewer.

Persons with no televisions may only have been exposed to campaign junk mail or outdoor signage, which tends to present a milder or sub-clinical picture.

Person must have at least three of the following:

* recurrent nightmares that a political candidate has come to live with the person indefinitely (bedwetting and insomnia are associated symptoms)

* person has persistent, intrusive fantasies of what s/he’d say to a candidate, if given the chance. “Shut up, shut up, shut up, you racist anachronism,” is a common one, as is, “I want my campaign contribution back, if this is the best you can come up with.”

* preoccupation with moving to a non-democratic country with no election process and no hope for one in the future

* person drops to the ground and curls into a thumb-sucking fetal position when phrases such as, “my opponent” or “if elected” are heard, regardless of context

* person believes not one thing s/he is told for many months after the initial campaign ad assault

* person believes the television has extraordinary, evil powers and hides the remote from family members in an attempt to save lives

* impulse control primarily manifesting in property destruction of TVs

* disillusionment with humanity

* intermittent blink-less staring and drooling and/or uncontrollable yawning

* concurrent substance abuse, anxiety, depression, and chronic annoyance leading to homicidal ideation

Associated Disorders

The following disorders often occur with Post-Campaign Ad Stress Disorder.

Post-Campaign Ad Delirium The person has no recollection of his or her former life, believing he is one of the recent candidates. He attempts to be truthful, humble and interact well with others. Experts believe it is an unconscious attempt to “undo” the campaign ads the person has been exposed to.

Campaign Ad Dependence A rare associated disorder, but not unheard of. Some people become addicted to the vitriolic, absurd, manipulative quality of current campaign ads. They often Tivo the worst of the campaign ads and call in sick to watch them, or watch when family members are not home, or are asleep. Relationships suffer. Denial is a common feature. In those individuals, electroshock treatments along with long-term psychoanalysis is required. Campaign Ad Watching Anonymous is also recommended.

Treatment

Hospitalization is seldom required for Post-Campaign Ad Stress Disorder, except in rare cases. A TV/radio/mail hiatus of several weeks is often necessary. Remembering sweet ads from yesteryear, like the “Please Don’t Squeeze the Charmin” ads of the 70’s, is sometimes effective. (Note: Many experts believe helping people associate happiness with advertising is not actually beneficial to a person’s long term functioning.) Reality testing such as, “People aren’t all blithering idiots” is often useful. Reassurances that ’08 is a long, long way away can be helpful for some, but realizing election season starts early only generates panic attacks in others, deepening the trauma. Discretion is advised.

Differential Diagnoses

These diagnoses are often confused with Post-Campaign Ad Stress Disorder.

Voting Apathy Disorder

Whatever.

Deciphering State and Local Propositions/Amendments Stress Disorder

This disorder is a pre-election and day-of election disorder, rather than post-election. It manifests in tremendous confusion and/or indecisiveness and intense questioning of one’s intellect when reading the fine print of local and state propositions and amendments, often leading to some form of brief substance abuse, uncontrollable swearing and/or blanks on the ballot.

Post-Just Listened to Rush Limbaugh for an Hour Stress Disorder

While this disorder is very similar to PCASD, sharing many symptoms such as severe annoyance, disillusionment with humanity and the fantasy of saying, “Shut up, shut up, shut up, you racist anachronism,” etc., Post-Rush Disorder can be distinguished from PCASD because it is a reaction to just one person. In addition, it is almost always an extremely serious and debilitating condition, often requiring long term hospitalization, and can happy year round. Prognosis is quite poor for those with this disorder.

Note: If symptoms of Post-Campaign Ad Stress Disorder linger for more than one month, the disorder may be confused with and/or exacerbated by Holiday Retail Ad Stress Disorder. But this disorder can be easily distinguished by its chief symptom, credit card debt.

CAROL NORRIS is a freelance writer, psychotherapist and long-time political activist. To see an archive of some of her articles, visit her tragically moribund, one day, maybe, to be resurrected blog: www.carolnorris.blogs.com

 

More articles by:

Carol Norris is a psychotherapist, freelance writer, and longtime political activist.

Weekend Edition
June 15, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Dan Kovalik
The US & Nicaragua: a Case Study in Historical Amnesia & Blindness
Jeremy Kuzmarov
Yellow Journalism and the New Cold War
Charles Pierson
The Day the US Became an Empire
Jonathan Cook
How the Corporate Media Enslave Us to a World of Illusions
Ajamu Baraka
North Korea Issue is Not De-nuclearization But De-Colonization
Andrew Levine
Midterms Coming: Antinomy Ahead
Louisa Willcox
New Information on 2017 Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Deaths Should Nix Trophy Hunting in Core Habitat
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Singapore Fling
Ron Jacobs
What’s So Bad About Peace, Man?
Robert Hunziker
State of the Climate – It’s Alarming!
L. Michael Hager
Acts and Omissions: The NYT’s Flawed Coverage of the Gaza Protest
Dave Lindorff
However Tenuous and Whatever His Motives, Trump’s Summit Agreement with Kim is Praiseworthy
Robert Fantina
Palestine, the United Nations and the Right of Return
Brian Cloughley
Sabre-Rattling With Russia
Chris Wright
To Be or Not to Be? That’s the Question
David Rosen
Why Do Establishment Feminists Hate Sex Workers?
Victor Grossman
A Key Congress in Leipzig
John Eskow
“It’s All Kinderspiel!” Trump, MSNBC, and the 24/7 Horseshit Roundelay
Paul Buhle
The Russians are Coming!
Joyce Nelson
The NED’s Useful Idiots
Lindsay Koshgarian
Trump’s Giving Diplomacy a Chance. His Critics Should, Too
Louis Proyect
American Nativism: From the Chinese Exclusion Act to Trump
Stan Malinowitz
On the Elections in Colombia
Camilo Mejia
Open Letter to Amnesty International on Nicaragua From a Former Amnesty International Prisoner of Conscience
David Krieger
An Assessment of the Trump-Kim Singapore Summit
Jonah Raskin
Cannabis in California: a Report From Sacramento
Josh Hoxie
Just How Rich Are the Ultra Rich?
CJ Hopkins
Awaiting the Putin-Nazi Apocalypse
Mona Younis
We’re the Wealthiest Country on Earth, But Over 40 Percent of Us Live in or Near Poverty
Dean Baker
Not Everything Trump Says on Trade is Wrong
James Munson
Trading Places: the Other 1% and the .001% Who Won’t Save Them
Rivera Sun
Stop Crony Capitalism: Protect the Net!
Franklin Lamb
Hezbollah Claims a 20-Seat Parliamentary Majority
William Loren Katz
Oliver Law, the Lincoln Brigade’s Black Commander
Ralph Nader
The Constitution and the Lawmen are Coming for Trump—He Laughs!
Tom Clifford
Mexico ’70 Sets the Goal for World Cup 
David Swanson
What Else Canadians Should Be Sorry For — Besides Burning the White House
Andy Piascik
Jane LaTour: 50+ Years in the Labor Movement (And Still Going)
Jill Richardson
Pruitt’s Abuse of Our Environment is Far More Dangerous Than His Abuse of Taxpayer Money
Ebony Slaughter-Johnson
Pardons Aren’t Policy
Daniel Warner
To Russia With Love? In Praise of Trump the Includer
Raouf Halaby
Talking Heads A’Talking Nonsense
Julian Vigo
On the Smearing of Jordan Peterson: On Dialogue and Listening
Larry Everest
A Week of Rachel Maddow…or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Ronald Reagan
David Yearsley
Hereditary: Where Things are Not What They Sound Like
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail