FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Fight for Survival of Union Rolls On at Northwest Airlines

The battle being waged at Northwest Airlines (NWA) by the independent Aircraft Mechanics Fraternal Association (AMFA) and its supporters rolls on into its second month. Northwest’s management has increased the pressure on the 4,400 strikers, pushing demands further and further as the weeks progress, towards what a company spokesperson called “a permanent solution for that segment of the workforce.”

Talks broke down September 11 after NWA pushed a proposal that AMFA Local 5 member Curt Booza characterized as an attempt “to completely eliminate us from the property.”

NWA began moves to permanently replace strikers September 13. Shifting from its original proposal to cut over half of its 4,400 AMFA jobs (including all of the lower-paid cleaner jobs that employ a greater percentage of women and people of color), in mid-September NWA demanded a 75 percent job reduction.

Though AMFA negotiators appeared ready to accept large-scale job cuts, NWA refused to entertain the union’s insistence on a 20-week severance packages for terminated workers. This refusal left negotiations at a stalemate, and workers remained on the lines.

Highlighting fears that larger givebacks would spread beyond the mechanics union, AMFA negotiator Jeff Mathews observed that NWA had raised its overall goal for wage and benefit concessions from all its unions from $1.1 billion to $1.4 billion.

According to Mathews, “Some groups, including the IAM, may be asked to shoulder a disproportionately larger share of the new target amount.” He added, “The company is intent onkeeping the heel of its boot on each of our throats.”

Despite mounting pressure, the strikers’ morale remains high. A month into the strike, only 10 AMFA members have crossed the lines. In places where AMFA locals are active and cross-union support is organized, rallies, fundraisers, and other actions have kept spirits relatively up.
HEARTS AND MINDS

In other unions, sharp divisions have developed over the strike, pitting irate rank and filers and local officers against International leaders who have either refused to endorse or actively undermined strike support efforts. Cross-union solidarity efforts in Detroit, Minneapolis, and San Francisco have run into such resistance.

Indeed, in the lead-up to the strike deadline, local labor bodies were explicitly ordered by the AFL-CIO not to participate in any efforts to assist strikers. In an August 15 memo, AFL-CIO Collective Bargaining Department Director Rick Bank ordered state federations and central labor councils not to organize or support boycotts, food banks, relief funds, turnout at AMFA picket lines, or rallies without the permission of the national AFL-CIO.

Local bodies were further told that they “have no power or authority to instruct affiliates to honor picket lines.” All requests to honor pickets were to be referred to the two AFL-CIO unions still working at NWA: the Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) and the Machinists union (IAM).

Alarmed by what they see as a potential major defeat for the labor movement, many unionists have been backing the strike despite the ban. While some hold criticisms of AMFA as a craft-oriented union with a history of decertification battles with AFL-CIO unions, many of these critics also maintain that the stakes are high enough to warrant throwing support behind the strikers.
LESSONS FROM 1981: PATCO

They point to the use of permanent replacements (which haven’t been seen in airlines since the 1989 Eastern Airlines strike), the deteriorating situation for all airline unions since 9/11, and the recent AFL-CIO split as reasons to support the strike.

“If we don’t [get behind the strikers], it shows that we haven’t learned a lesson from PATCO and on,” said Al Benchich, president of UAW Local 909 and co-chair of Southeast Michigan Jobs with Justice. AIf we don’t stand together, we’re going to fall as individuals.”

In a boost for the strikers, the UAW International donated $880,000 from its strike fund. UAW President Ron Gettelfinger said, “Northwest Airlines’ behavior toward AMFA is blatant union-busting and an insult to every American worker. The UAW is proud to offer this support to AMFA members.”

The International Longshore and Warehouse Union, the Aircraft Engineers International, the Professional Airways Systems Specialists (the union that represents FAA inspectors), the newly-formed Minnesota Change to Win Coalition (state affiliates of SEIU, Teamsters, UFCW, UNITE HERE, Laborers, and the Carpenters), four central labor councils (in Michigan, California, and Oregon), and a number of UAW locals have announced support for the strikers.

Additionally, UNITE HERE and Steelworkers District 2 have stopped flying Northwest.
LOCAL EFFORTS

In a few cities, union and community members organized strike support on short order.

In Detroit–a Northwest hub–activists from the late 1990s Detroit newspaper strike, Jobs with Justice, UAW, IBEW, Newspaper Guild (CWA), and Labor Notes joined with AMFA Local 5 members to organize an August 27 “ox roast” (a traditional fundraiser in which strikers’ families and strike supporters are fed while funds are raised) at IBEW Local 58’s hall.

IBEW International leaders intervened the day before the fundraiser, demanding that the local lock its doors for the weekend. Organizers scrambled to reschedule, moving the event to two local bars that had been used as support bases during the newspaper strike. Despite IBEW’s interference, over 150 local activists attended and $3,900 was raised.

Strikers also took their message to Labor Day events. UAW Region 1-A invited hundreds of AMFA Local 5 members and their families to march in its contingent in Detroit’s Labor Day March. Marching UAW, AFSCME, SEIU, NALC, APWU, and CWA members gave a warm response to strike supporters handing out leaflets and collecting money around a sound truck parked on the parade route.

Nearly 200 rallied in a symbolic picket at a local casino near the parade’s end, with signs saying, “Don’t Gamble with NWA.@ AMFA Local 5 President Bob Rose called the Labor Day action Aa shot in the arm.”
BROADENING OUT

Besides building outside support, strikers have been trying to broaden out their fight from the well-controlled airport picket lines.

A group of 20 Local 5 members drove to the CSX rail yard in Toledo and set up pickets on September 6. Ninety-five percent of the yard’s Detroit-bound freight traffic was snarled at this chokepoint after Teamster engineers and rail workers refused to cross the picket. Teamsters only returned to work after CSX won a court order on September 8 that mandated that they cross the lines.

AMFA members will travel to the Jobs with Justice conference and the Change to Win convention in St. Louis at the end of September to network and rally labor activists and leaders to their cause.
WILD CARDS

Although NWA has consistently claimed that the strike has not affected its operations, the airline filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy (along with another major carrier, Delta) on September 14. Rising fuel costs (spiked by Hurricane Katrina) and the effects of the strike (sliding on-time flight performance, declining ticket revenues, and the $101 million price tag for NWA’s union-busting strategy) led to losses estimated at $350-400 million in the third quarter.

Bankruptcy is a wild card for the strikers. US Air and United were able to use bankruptcy courts to force open contracts and extract hundreds of millions of dollars in concessions. AMFA leaders, however, see little to lose in the courts.

With the bankruptcy, strikers see the potential for a larger fight that would pull in other unions as NWA pushes even harder for concessions. If one or more of the unions representing flight attendants, pilots, or ramp and gate agents are drawn in, there is the chance that they may end up on the picket lines themselves. A broader strike involving flight crews could raise pressure on the company by grounding many of its flights.

Commenting on the need for urgent action, the Airline Workers News Service wrote: “Union members at Northwest are facing their own version of Hurricane Katrina. Unfortunately, we are all below sea level. Time is running outIf union members in the [Professional Flight Attendant Association] and IAM do not act soon to aid mechanics, cleaners and custodians, Northwest will simply dictate terms and destroy unions, contracts, and livelihoods.”

The question is: will these unions act and will it be enough?

CHRIS KUTALIK is currently co-editor of Labor Notes in Detroit. He comes to labor activism through his experiences as a local officer in Amalgamated Transit Union local 1549 in Austin, Texas and has served as an editor and writer for several alternative and mainstream publications. He can be reached at: chris@labornotes.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CLARIFICATION

ALEXANDER COCKBURN, JEFFREY ST CLAIR, BECKY GRANT AND THE INSTITUTE FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF JOURNALISTIC CLARITY, COUNTERPUNCH

We published an article entitled “A Saudiless Arabia” by Wayne Madsen dated October 22, 2002 (the “Article”), on the website of the Institute for the Advancement of Journalistic Clarity, CounterPunch, www.counterpunch.org (the “Website”).

Although it was not our intention, counsel for Mohammed Hussein Al Amoudi has advised us the Article suggests, or could be read as suggesting, that Mr Al Amoudi has funded, supported, or is in some way associated with, the terrorist activities of Osama bin Laden and the Al Qaeda terrorist network.

We do not have any evidence connecting Mr Al Amoudi with terrorism.

As a result of an exchange of communications with Mr Al Amoudi’s lawyers, we have removed the Article from the Website.

We are pleased to clarify the position.

August 17, 2005

 

More articles by:
April 23, 2018
Patrick Cockburn
In Middle East Wars It Pays to be Skeptical
Thomas Knapp
Just When You Thought “Russiagate” Couldn’t Get Any Sillier …
Gregory Barrett
The Moral Mask
Robert Hunziker
Chemical Madness!
David Swanson
Senator Tim Kaine’s Brief Run-In With the Law
Dave Lindorff
Starbucks Has a Racism Problem
Uri Avnery
The Great Day
Nyla Ali Khan
Girls Reduced to Being Repositories of Communal and Religious Identities in Kashmir
Ted Rall
Stop Letting Trump Distract You From Your Wants and Needs
Steve Klinger
The Cautionary Tale of Donald J. Trump
Kevin Zeese - Margaret Flowers
Conflict Over the Future of the Planet
Cesar Chelala
Gideon Levy: A Voice of Sanity from Israel
Weekend Edition
April 20, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Paul Street
Ruling Class Operatives Say the Darndest Things: On Devils Known and Not
Conn Hallinan
The Great Game Comes to Syria
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Mother of War
Andrew Levine
“How Come?” Questions
Doug Noble
A Tale of Two Atrocities: Douma and Gaza
Kenneth Surin
The Blight of Ukania
Howard Lisnoff
How James Comey Became the Strange New Hero of the Liberals
William Blum
Anti-Empire Report: Unseen Persons
Lawrence Davidson
Missiles Over Damascus
Patrick Cockburn
The Plight of the Yazidi of Afrin
Pete Dolack
Fooled Again? Trump Trade Policy Elevates Corporate Power
Stan Cox
For Climate Mobilization, Look to 1960s Vietnam Before Turning to 1940s America
William Hawes
Global Weirding
Dan Glazebrook
World War is Still in the Cards
Nick Pemberton
In Defense of Cardi B: Beyond Bourgeois PC Culture
Ishmael Reed
Hollywood’s Last Days?
Peter Certo
There Was Nothing Humanitarian About Our Strikes on Syria
Dean Baker
China’s “Currency Devaluation Game”
Ann Garrison
Why Don’t We All Vote to Commit International Crimes?
LEJ Rachell
The Baddest Black Power Artist You Never Heard Of
Lawrence Ware
All Hell Broke Out in Oklahoma
Franklin Lamb
Tehran’s Syria: Lebanon Colonization Project is Collapsing
Donny Swanson
Janus v. AFSCME: What’s It All About?
Will Podmore
Brexit and the Windrush Britons
Brian Saady
Boehner’s Marijuana Lobbying is Symptomatic of Special-Interest Problem
Julian Vigo
Google’s Delisting and Censorship of Information
Patrick Walker
Political Dynamite: Poor People’s Campaign and the Movement for a People’s Party
Fred Gardner
Medical Board to MDs: Emphasize Dangers of Marijuana
Rob Seimetz
We Must Stand In Solidarity With Eric Reid
Missy Comley Beattie
Remembering Barbara Bush
Wim Laven
Teaching Peace in a Time of Hate
Thomas Knapp
Freedom is Winning in the Encryption Arms Race
Mir Alikhan
There Won’t be Peace in Afghanistan Until There’s Peace in Kashmir
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail