FacebookTwitterRedditEmail

As Good as It Gets

March 2003

There was a face I knew! It was the coffee seller that my friend ordered from, and introduced with respect: “This gentleman is an accountant, but when times got bad and he couldn’t find appropriate work, he began to sell coffee.” The man was humble and welcoming, smiling inside an enormous purple parka, and adding, out of excess generosity, enough cardamom pods to make the little glass of coffee nearly atomic.

Here in one of Jenin’s several internet cafes, the coffee man was smiling from the screen of a website, alongside a brief but potent article by one Nick Pretzlik. Nick Pretzlik. I did not recognize the name. I assumed he was one of the roughly university-aged volunteers who come to Palestine to give of their energies and ears and hearts. Excitedly, I printed the photo and sloshed through the puddles to find the coffee seller with his purple parka protecting him from the dismal rain. His face lit up as he took the photo, offering no explanation as to the photographer.

October 2003

Several months and several borders later, I received a forwarded article about a family living under occupation. The writer was Nick Pretzlik, and he reached the heart of the matter and the heart of the reader with such clarity and compassion that I felt I must write to thank him. As suggested, I wrote to his wife, Ursula, who became an immediate friend and invited me to visit them during a stopover in London en route to Beirut. By this time, I had forgotten the photo of the Jenin man. Nick Pretzlik occurred to me as a new name.

December 2003

If I loved Nick’s articles, I loved Nick even more in person. So positive, gracious, at once down to earth and upbeat, light-footed and light-hearted. He seemed to embrace everyone in an aura of mirth and honesty and present possibilities. You felt that he was giving each one of you a little boost to your hopes and a gentle widening of your horizons.

After dinner, we finally got to talking about our various works in Palestine. Something he said took misty form in my mind, and I asked, “Was it you who took a photo of the coffee seller in downtown Jenin? I printed that photo for him and he was so happy!” This was a Eureka moment. “That solves the mystery!” exclaimed Nick. He related that when he returned to Jenin another time, our mutual friend pulled a piece of paper from his pocket and unfolded it to reveal Nick’s portrait of him. As before, he offered no explanation as to how he came upon the photo. Nick became closely acquainted with this man who had a number of family difficulties, and he helped him.

January 2004

Shortly after our first encounter, Nick and Ursula came to Beirut, where we met and included more new friends in our endeavors and Palestine-related family. We found more coincidences and shared awarenesses, and I quickly came to regard these wonderful, positive, practical people as the truest of friends.

They were wending their way to the West Bank. One never knows what will ensue on a trip to occupied Palestine, but Nick and Ursula happily agreed to visit a family home of mine and take some assistance, if they were able to get through. We went our various ways and one night while in `Ayn al-Hilwa Refugee Camp, I dreamt that I was in Jenin Refugee Camp, introducing two visitors to my Jenin family. The next morning, in real life, I received word that Nick and Ursula had met my friends and delivered the gift. My dream come true.

And Nick kept on writing persistently, attractively, humanely, using sound arguments–as if he were listening to an opponent and suggesting, respectfully, another view. He asked only a realistic apprehension of conditions and a search for normal justice.

In his participatory way, Nick encouraged me, too, in my writings about Palestine. I was honored by a few words he wrote in response to an essay: “That’s as good as it gets.”

Nick is as good as you can get. Nick’s energy and outlook and decisions to tell the untold stories are, to me, present and will endure.

Thank you, Nick, for your smile and wit and grace and all that goes with them.

Annie C. Higgins specializes in Arabic and Islamic studies, and is currently doing research in Jenin, Occupied Palestine.

 

http://nickpretzlik.com/

 

 

More articles by:

March 21, 2019
Ramzy Baroud
Uniting Fatah, Not Palestinians: The Dubious Role of Mohammed Shtayyeh
Nick Pemberton
Is Kamala Harris The Centrist We Need?
Nick Licata
All Southern States are Not the Same: Mississippi’s Challenge
Jesse Jackson
Trump’s Sly Encouragement of Lawless Violence
Cesar Chelala
Public Health Challenges in Latin America and the Caribbean
March 20, 2019
T.J. Coles
Countdown to “Full Spectrum Dominance”
W. T. Whitney
Re-Targeting Cuba: Why Title III of U.S. Helms-Burton Act will be a Horror Show
Kenneth Surin
Ukania’s Great Privatization Heist
Howard Lisnoff
“Say It Ain’t So, Joe:” the Latest Neoliberal from the War and Wall Street Party
Walter Clemens
Jailed Birds of a Feather May Sing Together
George Ochenski
Failing Students on Climate Change
Cesar Chelala
The Sweet Smell of Madeleine
Binoy Kampmark
Global Kids Strike
Nicky Reid
Where Have All the Flowers Gone?: Requiem for a Fictional Party
Elliot Sperber
Empedocles and You and Me 
March 19, 2019
Paul Street
Socialism Curiously Trumps Fascism in U.S. Political Threat Reporting
Jonah Raskin
Guy Standing on Anxiety, Anger and Alienation: an Interview About “The Precariat”
Patrick Cockburn
The Brutal Legacy of Bloody Sunday is a Powerful Warning to Those Hoping to Save Brexit
Robert Fisk
Turning Algeria Into a Necrocracy
John Steppling
Day of Wrath
Robin Philpot
Truth, Freedom and Peace Will Prevail in Rwanda
Victor Grossman
Women Marchers and Absentees
Binoy Kampmark
The Dangers of Values: Brenton Tarrant, Fraser Anning and the Christchurch Shootings
Jeff Sher
Let Big Pharma Build the Wall
Jimmy Centeno
Venezuela Beneath the Skin of Imperialism
Jeffrey Sommers – Christopher Fons
Scott Walker’s Failure, Progressive Wisconsin’s Win: Milwaukee’s 2020 Democratic Party Convention
Steve Early
Time for Change at NewsGuild?
March 18, 2019
Scott Poynting
Terrorism Has No Religion
Ipek S. Burnett
Black Lives on Trial
John Feffer
The World’s Most Dangerous Divide
Paul Cochrane
On the Ground in Venezuela vs. the Media Spectacle
Dean Baker
The Fed and the 3.8 Percent Unemployment Rate
Thomas Knapp
Social Media Companies “Struggle” to Help Censors Keep us in the Dark
Binoy Kampmark
Death in New Zealand: The Christchurch Shootings
Mark Weisbrot
The Reality Behind Trump’s Venezuela Regime Change Coalition
Weekend Edition
March 15, 2019
Friday - Sunday
Andrew Levine
Is Ilhan Omar Wrong…About Anything?
Kenn Orphan
Grieving in the Anthropocene
Jeffrey Kaye
On the Death of Guantanamo Detainee 10028
Stan Cox – Paul Cox
In Salinas, Puerto Rico, Vulnerable Americans Are Still Trapped in the Ruins Left by Hurricane Maria
Ben Debney
Christchurch, the White Victim Complex and Savage Capitalism
Eric Draitser
Did Dallas Police and Local Media Collude to Cover Up Terrorist Threats against Journalist Barrett Brown?
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Straighten Up and Fly Right
Jack Rasmus
Trump’s $34 Trillion Deficit and Debt Bomb
David Rosen
America’s Puppet: Meet Juan Guaidó
Jason Hirthler
Annexing the Stars: Walcott, Rhodes, and Venezuela
FacebookTwitterRedditEmail