FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

"Missing" Evidence

 

Evidence of a notorious crime has turned up in a warren of the State Department, where it had been buried for 30 years. It is notorious because it was the subject of a great motion picture, “Missing,” about the desperate effort of an American father to locate his son, in the wake of the overthrow of the democratic socialist government of Chile. The embassy said it had looked into it and been told that his son had been released, and possibly gone abroad. It never changed its story but the new evidence confirms that the young man was on a list of suspects they had provided to the military, that an American agent was present during his interrogation and that they knew he had then been killed. You may read more about it in the National Security Archives, in the bulletins EXTRA! and CounterPunch, and in books by Seymour Hersh and others.

A few days before the movie “Missing” opened, the Times ran a hugespread denouncing it as a libel on our diplomatic service. It suggested that the great director Costa Gravas might have been so indifferent to the truth and so hostile because he was a Greek. I quote that in “My TIMES: A Memoir of Dissent,” to explain my decision to quit the foreign staff.

There were many, many such crimes in the covert wars, which never seem to end. And throughout, the Times has served to cover them up. It was virtually a mouthpiece for the master war criminal Henry Kissinger. It has seldom, if ever, apologized. Where are those weapons of mass destruction?

Pew! Another Poll

The notion has got around that the world doesn’t appreciate what we’ve been doing for it . So the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press ordered up a scientific poll of eight countries. They asked, briefly — Do you believe the U.S. worries too much about terrorism? And, do you think our war is a sincere effort to reduce terrorism?

You’d think they were White House reporters asking these tough questions. And they’re the same people, really. When those lapdogs retire, some of them find high-paid jobs passing judgment on the media they’ve left behind. You’ve no-doubt seen two of the most prominent ones–the Kalb brothers–Mxxxxx, formerly of NBC, and Bernard, who was at the Times in my day (and was he awful!). Together they committed a book in adoration of Henry Kissinger, who was then engaged in the worst of his crimes against humanity.

Well, that Pew poll was worded to confuse — are we too worried about terror? Is Bush sincere about going for it?–but the Times concluded that it showed hostility growing, both East and West. The White House was blaming John Kerry, because talking into a live microphone, he either did or did not say that foreign leaders had told him the Bushies were liars and crooks.

Well, I haven’t polled a foreign leader in years, but I got a phone call this morning from an English friend who wanted to share with me the remark of a writer who had just won a top literary prize. She let on to the British press that she was pleased — and pleased also to see Tony Blair in disgrace.

As for the U.S., she thought we needed a regime change. Ojala.

A Peek at an Answer

The Times reminded me again today of its way of droning on and burying the point, if any, near the end. Not Tom Friedman– he begins by declaring war on Spain and calling for sending more troops to Iraq. And that was just clearing his throat. A more Timesian example is an editorial on the power shortage in New York.

It says there’s a real smart bunch of operators who want to build a backup network to protect us against brownouts. Got it all figured out–they lined up Con Ed, the brokers, politicians, even environmentalists. And evidently the Times. There’s just one hitch. Wall Street won’t put up a dime unless the state guarantees it a profit for the next ten years or so. That is of course like the Enron deals, which practically bankrupted California, and blacked it out, too.

The Times has always been soft on Con Ed, and it was hot for deregulation. It admits that a state guarantee of a profit is not exactly a free market, but says we can’t expect investors to take on the risk:– so we have to go along, to avoid more brownouts. It looks like a stickup to me. Heads they win, tails we lose. And watch out for those manhole covers.

JOHN L. HESS is a former writer for the New York Times, a career he chronicles in his excellent new book My Times: a Memoir of Dissent. Hess is now a political commentator for WBAI.

 

More articles by:

JOHN L. HESS is a former writer for the New York Times, a career he chronicles in his excellent new book My Times: a Memoir of Dissent. Hess is now a political commentator for WBAI.

Weekend Edition
April 20, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Paul Street
Ruling Class Operatives Say the Darndest Things: On Devils Known and Not
Conn Hallinan
The Great Game Comes to Syria
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Mother of War
Andrew Levine
“How Come?” Questions
Doug Noble
A Tale of Two Atrocities: Douma and Gaza
Kenneth Surin
The Blight of Ukania
Howard Lisnoff
How James Comey Became the Strange New Hero of the Liberals
William Blum
Anti-Empire Report: Unseen Persons
Lawrence Davidson
Missiles Over Damascus
Patrick Cockburn
The Plight of the Yazidi of Afrin
Pete Dolack
Fooled again? Trump Trade Policy Elevates Corporate Power
Stan Cox
For Climate Mobilization, Look to 1960s Vietnam Before Turning to 1940s America
William Hawes
Global Weirding
Dan Glazebrook
World War is Still in the Cards
Nick Pemberton
In Defense of Cardi B: Beyond Bourgeois PC Culture
Ishmael Reed
Hollywood’s Last Days?
Peter Certo
There Was Nothing Humanitarian About Our Strikes on Syria
Dean Baker
China’s “Currency Devaluation Game”
Ann Garrison
Why Don’t We All Vote to Commit International Crimes?
LEJ Rachell
The Baddest Black Power Artist You Never Heard Of
Lawrence Ware
All Hell Broke Out in Oklahoma
Franklin Lamb
Tehran’s Syria: Lebanon Colonization Project is Collapsing
Donny Swanson
Janus v. AFSCME: What’s It All About?
Will Podmore
Brexit and the Windrush Britons
Brian Saady
Boehner’s Marijuana Lobbying is Symptomatic of Special-Interest Problem
Julian Vigo
Google’s Delisting and Censorship of Information
Patrick Walker
Political Dynamite: Poor People’s Campaign and the Movement for a People’s Party
Fred Gardner
Medical Board to MDs: Emphasize Dangers of Marijuana
Rob Seimetz
We Must Stand In Solidarity With Eric Reid
Missy Comley Beattie
Remembering Barbara Bush
Wim Laven
Teaching Peace in a Time of Hate
Thomas Knapp
Freedom is Winning in the Encryption Arms Race
Mir Alikhan
There Won’t be Peace in Afghanistan Until There’s Peace in Kashmir
Robert Koehler
Playing War in Syria
Tamara Pearson
US Shootings: Gun Industry Killing More People Overseas
John Feffer
Trump’s Trade War is About Trump Not China
Morris Pearl
Why the Census Shouldn’t Ask About Citizenship
Ralph Nader
Bill Curry on the Move against Public Corruption
Josh Hoxie
Five Tax Myths Debunked
Leslie Mullin
Democratic Space in Adverse Times: Milestone at Haiti’s University of the Aristide Foundation
Louis Proyect
Syria and Neo-McCarthyism
Dean Baker
Finance 202 Meets Economics 101
Abel Cohen
Forget Gun Control, Try Bullet Control
Robert Fantina
“Damascus Time:” An Iranian Movie
David Yearsley
Bach and Taxes
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail