FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Revisiting the Paranoid Style in the Dark

In November 1965, all electric power in an 80,000-square-mile area of the northeastern United States and Canada failed. Like the most recent failure, the breakdown was a total surprise and attributable to a single plant failure. In 1965, the electric grid was supposed to shift power from areas with excess generating capacity to other areas in the network experiencing a drain, but instead of counteracting the local failure, it spread out of control leaving the whole system and dozens of cities in the dark. It wasn’t supposed to happen then. It certainly wasn’t supposed to happen now. In 1965, pundits presented the dilemma as a question of humans versus machines, and concluded that people must control machines. It struck at the very heart of the fallacy that we were in control of the rise of technology after World War II, and that that “progress” was unequivocally good.

So, too, with the more recent failure. But rather than assessing our technological progress (and maybe we should), the bigger question is how we should assess progress in our efforts to ensure national security. Do we feel safer at home in our war against terrorism?

The enduring images on the evening news showed New Yorkers fearing that the blackout had been the result of a terrorist attack. While we might thankfully acknowledge that it was not the work of enemies to the United States, it would behoove us to carefully think about our psyche and our faith in such protective measures as the Patriot Act, Homeland Security Act, and pre-emptive strikes. It would appear, rather, that Americans are entering a new generation of what the great American historian Richard Hofstadter once aptly called the “paranoid style,” that sense of heated exaggeration, suspiciousness, and conspiratorial fantasy that defined much of the Cold War.

Hofstadter did not introduce the paranoid style as a clinical term, but rather as a force in politics, and its impact on the modes of expression that influenced the way in which ideas were popularly received. In sum, it was an effective form of political rhetoric. In Hofstadter’s able hands, the paranoid style aptly demonstrated how much political leverage could be squeezed out of the animosities and passions of a small minority. Its new variation presents a far more ominous iteration, as it is a resounding majority who appears willing to submit to the threats.

The terrorist threats are very real. I don’t mean to suggest that the potential for attacks on American soil is a figment of our collective imagination. But the fear threatens to consume our collective imagination. Something has to give. Heightened security has come at the expense of American freedoms. We are told that such security measures are essential to ensure our safety, and yet we continue to quake at the prospect of an imminent attack.

It doesn’t add up that we should continually strive for more security-at considerable expense financial, political, and psychological-and still not feel any the safer. Americanism as conceived by the liberties upon which this country was founded is under attack, but only a portion of that danger is from an external force. Our new paranoid style is racing to inhibit our freedoms in order to protect them. The irony is palpable. And all for security from things that go bump in the dark.

MICHAEL EGAN teaches in the Department of History at Washington State University. He can be reached at: michaele@wsu.edu

 

More articles by:
April 26, 2018
Patrick Cockburn
As Trump Berates Iran, His Options are Limited
Daniel Warner
From May 1968 to May 2018: Politics and Student Strikes
Simone Chun – Kevin Martin
Diplomacy in Korea and the Hope It Inspires
George Wuerthner
The Attack on Wilderness From Environmentalists
CJ Hopkins
The League of Assad-Loving Conspiracy Theorists
Richard Schuberth
“MeToo” and the Liberation of Sex
Barbara Nimri Aziz
Sacred Assemblies in Baghdad
Dean Baker
Exonerating Bad Economic Policy for Trump’s Win
Vern Loomis
The 17 Gun Salute
Gary Leupp
What It Means When the U.S. President Conspicuously and Publicly Removes a Speck of Dandruff from the French President’s Lapel
Robby Sherwin
The Hat
April 25, 2018
Stanley L. Cohen
Selective Outrage
Dan Kovalik
The Empire Turns Its Sights on Nicaragua – Again!
Joseph Essertier
The Abductees of Japan and Korea
Ramzy Baroud
The Ghost of Herut: Einstein on Israel, 70 Years Ago
W. T. Whitney
Imprisoned FARC Leader Faces Extradition: Still No Peace in Colombia
Manuel E. Yepe
Washington’s Attack on Syria Was a Mockery of the World
John White
My Silent Pain for Toronto and the World
Dean Baker
Bad Projections: the Federal Reserve, the IMF and Unemployment
David Schultz
Why Donald Trump Should Not be Allowed to Pardon Michael Cohen, His Friends, or Family Members
Mel Gurtov
Will Abe Shinzo “Make Japan Great Again”?
Binoy Kampmark
Enoch Powell: Blood Speeches and Anniversaries
Frank Scott
Weapons and Walls
April 24, 2018
Carl Boggs
Russia and the War Party
William A. Cohn
Carnage Unleashed: the Pentagon and the AUMF
Nathan Kalman-Lamb
The Racist Culture of Canadian Hockey
María Julia Bertomeu
On Angers, Disgusts and Nauseas
Nick Pemberton
How To Buy A Seat In Congress 101
Ron Jacobs
Resisting the Military-Now More Than Ever
Paul Bentley
A Velvet Revolution Turns Bloody? Ten Dead in Toronto
Sonali Kolhatkar
The Left, Syria and Fake News
Manuel E. Yepe
The Confirmation of Democracy in Cuba
Peter Montgomery
Christian Nationalism: Good for Politicians, Bad for America and the World
Ted Rall
Bad Drones
Jill Richardson
The Latest Attack on Food Stamps
Andrew Stewart
What Kind of Unionism is This?
Ellen Brown
Fox in the Hen House: Why Interest Rates Are Rising
April 23, 2018
Patrick Cockburn
In Middle East Wars It Pays to be Skeptical
Thomas Knapp
Just When You Thought “Russiagate” Couldn’t Get Any Sillier …
Gregory Barrett
The Moral Mask
Robert Hunziker
Chemical Madness!
David Swanson
Senator Tim Kaine’s Brief Run-In With the Law
Dave Lindorff
Starbucks Has a Racism Problem
Uri Avnery
The Great Day
Nyla Ali Khan
Girls Reduced to Being Repositories of Communal and Religious Identities in Kashmir
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail