FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Friendly Fire

“Fratricide” is a fancy Latin word used at the Pentagon to refer to the slaughter of our own soldiers in “friendly fire” incidents. Months before Bush Two’s War, high-placed military sources were already cautioning front-line commanders against “an obsession with preventing fratricide.” With good reason, one might say, if the reason weren’t so bad.

During Gulf War One, the last time a U.S. Army was ordered into battle, an unprecedented percentage of the casualties it suffered were self-inflicted.

By Pentagon estimates, the proportion of friendly fire casualties in 1991 was higher than in any previous war — 10 times as high as in any other modern war, said the Washington Post at the time.

More than one-in-five Americans killed in action were butchered not by Saddam’s forces but by their fellow Americans. Imagine if that had been true in the Second World War. We’d have killed hundreds of thousands of our own people.

Among non-lethal casualties in Bush One’s War, according to numerous reports, the most common inflictor of friendly-fire wounding suffered by American combatants was neither gunshot nor bayonet nor shrapnel.

It was rape.

Rape is the other perverse meaning of “fratricide.”

Is it unpatriotic to mention these things? Merely to know them is profoundly unsettling. The “fragging” of officers in Viet Nam pales by comparison. Even in the false logic of our day (do you “oppose the war” or do you “support our people in uniform”?) the rape of uniformed American soldiers by other Americans, under the leadership of officers who have been cautioned not to be obsessed with preventing it, is a sobering thought, especially in light of recent news from Colorado Springs.

More than a decade has passed since the first Gulf War. In the interval, the U.S. Air Force Academy has demonstrably not yielded to an “obsession” with preventing rape. Officials are currently reviewing at least 56 reports of rape and other sexual offenses, and to their credit they’ve gone on record as saying they believe many more such incidents have gone unreported. Nearly all of the rapists are from the class of people who like to be identified as “superior officers” when they have their trousers up.

The Academy’s initial response was to crack down hard on the rape victims for coming forward. Even now, by announcing that henceforward male and female cadets will be housed in separate dorm rooms, the Academy appears to blame the victims, suggesting that they brought it on themselves merely by being present. Apparently the education of our officers is in the hands of people who believe it is unrealistic to expect men to refrain from rape if women are accessible. (And to think, we don’t want Gays in the military because it might make such “men” uncomfortable.)

There were commentators in 1991 who worried aloud on TV about what might happen if a female American soldier fell into the hands of the barbarous Iraqis. So great was the fear that she might be raped that hardly anyone dared mention it directly. No one thought to warn her to stay out of Colorado Springs.

On the streets of Baghdad today they are not overly concerned with American fratricide. They are more likely to be discussing the potential fate of Iraqi women who may fall into the hands of American soldiers. The fear is that “liberation” may be just another word for rape and plunder. On what basis, I wonder, could anyone assure them that it isn’t?

What about “fratricidal” behavior among those who didn’t get into the Academies? Studies show that spousal violence is significantly worse among military families than among civilians, and that it’s also worse among commissioned officers than among the enlisted. The higher the rank, the more slapping and hair pulling.

Odd, isn’t it? The more power people get, the more violently they behave.

So what do you want, Vest? A non-violent military???

Yeah.

DAVID VEST writes the Rebel Angel column for CounterPunch.

He can be reached at: davidvest@springmail.com

For a sneak peek at Vest’s new CD of scorching blues and rock ‘n roll, Way Down Here, visit: http://www.rebelangel.com

 

More articles by:

DAVID VEST writes the Rebel Angel column for CounterPunch. He and his band, The Willing Victims, have just released a scorching new CD, Serve Me Right to Shuffle. His essay on Tammy Wynette is featured in CounterPunch’s new collection on art, music and sex, Serpents in the Garden.

December 13, 2018
John Davis
What World Do We Seek?
Subhankar Banerjee
Biological Annihilation: a Planet in Loss Mode
Lawrence Davidson
What the Attack on Marc Lamont Hill Tells Us
James McEnteer
Breathless
Ramzy Baroud
The Real Face of Justin Trudeau: Are Palestinians Canada’s new Jews?
Dean Baker
Pelosi Would Sabotage the Progressive Agenda With a Pay-Go Rule
Elliot Sperber
Understanding the Yellow Vests Movement through Basic Color Theory 
Rivera Sun
The End of the NRA? Business Magazines Tell Activists: The Strategy is Working
Kevin Zeese - Margaret Flowers
Historic Opportunity to Transform Trade
George Ochenski
Trump Trashes Sage Grouse Protections in Another cCollaboration Failure
December 12, 2018
Arshad Khan
War, Anniversaries and Lessons Never Learned
Paul Street
Blacking Out the Yellow Vests on Cable News: Corporate Media Doing its Job
Kenneth Surin
The Brexit Shambles Rambles On
David Schultz
Stacking the Deck Against Democracy in Wisconsin
Steve Early
The Housing Affordability Crisis and What Millennials Can do About It
George Ochenski
Collaboration Failure: Trump Trashes Sage Grouse Protections
Rob Seimetz
Bringing a Life Into a Dying World: A Letter From a Father to His Unborn Son
Michael Howard
PETA and the ‘S’-Word
John Kendall Hawkins
Good Panopt, Bad Panopt: Does It Make A Difference?
Kim C. Domenico
Redeeming Utopia: a Meditation On An Essay by Ursula LeGuin
Binoy Kampmark
Exhuming Franco: Spain’s Immemorial Divisions
ADRIAN KUZMINSKI
Democratizing Money
Laura Finley
Congress Must Reauthorize VAWA
December 11, 2018
Eric Draitser
AFRICOM: A Neocolonial Occupation Force?
Sheldon Richman
War Over Ukraine?
Louis Proyect
Why World War II, Not the New Deal, Ended the Great Depression
Howard Lisnoff
Police Violence and Mass Policing in the U.S.
Mark Ashwill
A “Patriotic” Education Study Abroad Program in Viet Nam: God Bless America, Right or Wrong!
Laura Flanders
HUD Official to Move into Public Housing?
Nino Pagliccia
Resistance is Not Terrorism
Matthew Johnson
See No Evil, See No Good: The Truth Is Not Black and White
Maria Paez Victor
How Reuters Slandered Venezuela’s Social Benefits Card
December 10, 2018
Jacques R. Pauwels
Foreign Interventions in Revolutionary Russia
Richard Klin
The Disasters of War
Katie Fite
Rebranding Bundy
Gary Olson
A Few Thoughts on Politics and Personal Identity
Patrick Cockburn
Brexit Britain’s Crisis of Self-Confidence Will Only End in Tears and Rising Nationalism
Andrew Moss
Undocumented Citizen
Dean Baker
Trump and China: Going With Patent Holders Against Workers
Lawrence Wittner
Reviving the Nuclear Disarmament Movement: a Practical Proposal
Dan Siegel
Thoughts on the 2018 Elections and Beyond
Thomas Knapp
Election 2020: I Can Smell the Dumpster Fires Already
Weekend Edition
December 07, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Steve Hendricks
What If We Just Buy Off Big Fossil Fuel? A Novel Plan to Mitigate the Climate Calamity
Jeffrey St. Clair
Cancer as Weapon: Poppy Bush’s Radioactive War on Iraq
Paul Street
The McCain and Bush Death Tours: Establishment Rituals in How to be a Proper Ruler
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail