FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail

Dems Need to Stand for Something!

While the national pundits postulate on the reasons why minority voters didn’t turn out as enthusiastically and effectively as they think blacks and minorities should have, minority voters themselves know the truth. For generations, the Democratic Party has taken the minority vote for granted. In 1996, Max Cleland was delivered from almost certain defeat with a strong black vote from the 4th Congressional District. In 1998, Roy Barnes was taken to the Governor’s Mansion as a result of, once again, a strong black vote. But these two stunning victories failed to see sufficient returns for blacks in Georgia. Starting in the days of Martin Luther King, Jr., black leaders have warned the Democratic Party to deliver on that check returned to black America stamped “insufficient funds.”

In fact, in a recent CNN analysis of the black vote, the current Senate Democratic majority is traced directly to the black vote of 1996, 1998, and 2000–“the election cycles that produced the current 50 Democratic seats. CNN’s conclusion: had no blacks voted in any of those years, the Democratic majority would have disappeared to no more than 37 Democratic Senate seats. Yet, in a Joint Session to confirm the 2000 Presidential Electoral vote no Democratic Senator would rise and object to the Florida electors, which would have given the objecting Congressional Black Caucus two hours to debate the 2000 Florida debacle. The Democratic Party must do more to deliver the spoils of victory to its base minority communities or else, the Democratic Party will experience many more defeats. White Democratic leaders going to black churches in the weeks just preceding an important election smacks of insincerity and actually hinders the Democratic campaign. Black voters, like all voters, will respond to respectful attention on the issues that affect the community. The fact that black and minority communities continue to suffer huge quality of life disparities will undoubtedly contribute to the drag on minority enthusiasm in the ritual of voting that seldom results in fundamental changes in the quality of life for the bulk of minorities in America.

The stunning General Election debacle just experienced by Georgia Democrats clearly indicates that the Georgia Democratic Party has been on the wrong track and must set itself straight or be forever consigned to history’s sidelines. For the first time since the Civil War a Republican will occupy Georgia’s Governor’s Mansion. The longest serving Speaker of the House in any state of our union, Georgia’s own Tom Murphy, will no longer occupy that familiar seat; and several shoo-in Democratic Congressional seats didn’t turn out that way. In addition, one so-called Democrat who was elected last night has vowed to vote with the Republicans on all the “critical” issues. Clearly, Democratic strength in the State of Georgia has been diluted to levels unprecedented since the Civil War.

The people have clearly said to the Democrats that the current way is the wrong way.

The Democratic Party and its leadership must look and think like the people it purports to represent. Democrats must stand against Bush’s impending war and the increased militarization of our foreign and domestic policy. Democrats must not be afraid to tackle the issue of our national and international security and the lack of accountability thus far of the Bush Administration for tremendous failures witnessed by us all. Democrats must decry the growing expenditures of guns over butter and the Bush Administration’s failure to fund crucial domestic needs. And finally, it is the economy, stupid!

All Democrats must share in the joy of victory or certainly many more will feel today’s sting of defeat. The new, post-November 5, 2002 Democratic principle must be that every voter is important and every vote counts.

Failure to take stock now will forever consign Democrats to the sidelines of public policy.

 

More articles by:

December 19, 2018
Carl Boggs
Russophobia and the Specter of War
Jonathan Cook
American Public’s Backing for One-State Solution Falls on Deaf Ears
Daniel Warner
1968: The Year That Will Not Go Away
Arshad Khan
Developing Country Issues at COP24 … and a Bit of Good News for Solar Power and Carbon Capture
Kenneth Surin
Trump’s African Pivot: Another Swipe at China
Patrick Bond
South Africa Searches for a Financial Parachute, Now That a $170 Billion Foreign Debt Cliff Looms
Tom Clifford
Trade for Hostages? Trump’s New Approach to China
Binoy Kampmark
May Days in Britain
John Feffer
Globalists Really Are Ruining Your Life
John O'Kane
Drops and the Dropped: Diversity and the Midterm Elections
December 18, 2018
Charles Pierson
Where No Corn Has Grown Before: Better Living Through Climate Change?
Evaggelos Vallianatos
The Waters of American Democracy
Patrick Cockburn
Will Anger in Washington Over the Murder of Khashoggi End the War in Yemen?
George Ochenski
Trump is on the Ropes, But the Pillage of Natural Resources Continues
Farzana Versey
Tribals, Missionaries and Hindutva
Robert Hunziker
Is COP24 One More Big Bust?
David Macaray
The Truth About Nursing Homes
Nino Pagliccia
Have the Russian Military Aircrafts in Venezuela Breached the Door to “America’s Backyard”?
Paul Edwards
Make America Grate Again
David Rosnick
The Impact of OPEC on Climate Change
Binoy Kampmark
The Kosovo Blunder: Moving Towards a Standing Army
Andrew Stewart
Shine a Light for Immigration Rights in Providence
December 17, 2018
Susan Abulhawa
Marc Lamont Hill’s Detractors are the True Anti-Semites
Jake Palmer
Viktor Orban, Trump and the Populist Battle Over Public Space
Martha Rosenberg
Big Pharma Fights Proposal to Keep It From Looting Medicare
David Rosen
December 17th: International Day to End Violence against Sex Workers
Binoy Kampmark
The Case that Dare Not Speak Its Name: the Conviction of Cardinal Pell
Dave Lindorff
Making Trump and Other Climate Criminals Pay
Bill Martin
Seeing Yellow
Julian Vigo
The World Google Controls and Surveillance Capitalism
ANIS SHIVANI
What is Neoliberalism?
James Haught
Evangelicals Vote, “Nones” Falter
Vacy Vlanza
The Australian Prime Minister’s Rapture for Jerusalem
Martin Billheimer
Late Year’s Hits for the Hanging Sock
Weekend Edition
December 14, 2018
Friday - Sunday
Andrew Levine
A Tale of Two Cities
Peter Linebaugh
The Significance of The Common Wind
Bruce E. Levine
The Ketamine Chorus: NYT Trumpets New Anti-Suicide Drug
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Fathers and Sons, Bushes and Bin Ladens
Kathy Deacon
Coffee, Social Stratification and the Retail Sector in a Small Maritime Village
Nick Pemberton
Praise For America’s Second Leading Intellectual
Robert Hunziker
The Yellow Vest Insurgency – What’s Next?
Nick Alexandrov
George H. W. Bush: Another Eulogy
Patrick Cockburn
The Yemeni Dead: Six Times Higher Than Previously Reported
Brian Cloughley
Principles and Morality Versus Cash and Profit? No Contest
Michael F. Duggan
Climate Change and the Limits of Reason
FacebookTwitterGoogle+RedditEmail