FacebookTwitterRedditEmail

Women Push Back

Let the corporate criminals take over Wall Street.

And investors flee the market.

Hello criminals.

Goodbye market.

Pollute nature.

And nature confronts the polluters.

Push the people to the edge of their misery, and the people push back.

In Escravos, Nigeria, 600 women seized control of the ChevronTexaco oil terminal.

The unarmed women villagers threatened to remove their clothes — a traditional shaming gesture aimed at humiliating ChevronTexaco.

Despite its great oil wealth, the Niger Delta is among the poorest — and most polluted — places in West Africa.

“Chevron has neglected us,” says Felicia Itsero, 67, one of the protesting women. “They have neglected us for a long time. For example, any time spills occur, they don’t do proper clean-up or pay compensation. Our roofs are destroyed by their chemical. No good drinking water in our rivers. Our fishes are killed on daily basis by their chemicals, even the fishes we catch in our rivers, they smell of crude oil.” (see http://www.moles.org)

In West Virginia, the coal industry, which for generations has controlled West Virginia, is trying to jam through a special session of the state legislature a new law that would allow coal trucks to carry 120,000 pounds of coal — up from the previous limit of 80,000. There goes traffic safety. There go the roads.

Last week, the Charleston Gazette, the state’s leading newspaper, referring to the protests in Nigeria, wrote this:

“This drain the wealth pattern (in Nigeria), the essence of colonialism, smacks of the way out-of-state coal corporations treat West Virginians. We wonder if a naked protest (in West Virginia) would accomplish anything.”

Last week, Julia Butterfly Hill, was arrested and deported from Ecuador. (see http://www.amazonwatch.org)

Hill was protesting an Occidental oil pipeline being built through a nature reserve. The pipeline faces massive opposition from indigenous communities that would be affected.

She was roughed up. She was taken in the morning to the airport escorted by 10 police officers and then forced to board a plane to Panama.

Hill gained worldwide recognition in the late 1990s after spending two years camped atop a redwood tree in northern California to save it from being cut down. In Ecuador, she met with the Mindo community, which staged a three-month tree sit to block construction of the pipeline.

And as we write, Diane Wilson, a fourth generation shrimper and mother of five, is outside of a Union Carbide chemical facility in her hometown, Sea Drift, Texas. (see http://www.bhopal.net)

Dow Chemical purchased Union Carbide in 1999.

The Dow facility is one her area’s biggest polluters.

Wilson is in the midst of a hunger strike to protest Union Carbide’s treatment of residents of Bhopal, India.

That’s the city in northern India that was gassed when a Union Carbide facility blew up in 1984, killing thousands.

Wilson visited Bhopal after the accident and has never forgotten.

She is outraged that Dow is pushing to water down the criminal charge against Warren Andersen, the former Union Carbide CEO, to criminal negligence, a non-extraditable offense.

She is outraged that the 150,000 victims received only $500 from Union Carbide, when in the United States, there have been million dollar settlements paid out by Dow to people injured here.

Following the demands of victims in India, Diane Wilson wants Andersen extradited to India.

Warren Andersen is a fugitive from the Indian courts.

She wants the company to face pending criminal charges for culpable homicide.

For 15 years now, Wilson has been fighting the chemical companies that destroyed the bay that provided for generations of her family.

The corporate counterattack against Wilson has been vicious.

Her dogs have been killed.

Members of her family have been shot at.

Her shrimp boat has been sunk twice.

But she continues to fight for justice.

She says she will continue the water-only hunger strike until the people of Bhopal get justice.

That means money, and a criminal trial of Union Carbide/Dow, and its executives.

Wilson’s hunger strike follows one begun in New Delhi on June 8, when two women gas survivors from Bhopal — Tara Bai, 35, and Rashida Bi, 46 — together with long-time Bhopal activist Satinath (Sathyu) Sarangi, 48, sat outside the Indian Parliament and pledged to fast until the Government ensured that justice would be done in Bhopal.

After 18 days without food, the two women hunger strikers collapsed during a mass rally and were taken to hospital.

Sathyu broke his fast with orange juice.

Wilson picked up the fast soon thereafter. She says she will continue until justice is done in Bhopal.

Women in Texas, Nigeria, Ecuador, and India are teaching us a basic truth.

You can talk or write a blue streak and who listens?

But put your body on the line and things begin to move.

Get up.

Get out.

Push back.

Russell Mokhiber is editor of the Washington, D.C.-based Corporate Crime Reporter. Robert Weissman is editor of the Washington, D.C.-based Multinational Monitor, and co-director of Essential Action. They are co-authors of Corporate Predators: The Hunt for MegaProfits and the Attack on Democracy (Monroe, Maine: Common Courage Press, 1999.

 

August 11, 2020
Richard D. Wolff
Why Capitalism is in Constant Conflict With Democracy
Paul Street
Defund Fascism, Blue and Orange
Richard C. Gross
Americans Scorned
Andrew Levine
Trump and Biden, Two Ignoble Minds Here O’erthrown
Patrick Cockburn
The Rise of Nationalism Has Led to the Increased Repression of Minorities
Sonali Kolhatkar
Trump’s Presidency is a Death Cult
Colin Todhunter
Pushing GMO Crops into India: Experts Debunk High-Level Claims of Bt Cotton Success
Valerie Croft
How Indigenous Peoples are Using Ancestral Organizing Practices to Fight Mining Corporations and Covid-19
David Rovics
Tear Gas Ted Has a Tantrum in Portland
Dean Baker
There is No Evidence That Generous Unemployment Benefits are Making It Difficult to Find Workers
Robert Fantina
War on Truth: How Kashmir Struggles for Freedom of Press
Dave Lindorff
Trump Launches Attack on Social Security and Medicare
Elizabeth Schmidt
COVID-19 Poses a Huge Threat to Stability in Africa
Parth M.N.
Coping With a Deadly Virus, a Social One, Too
Thomas Knapp
The “Election Interference” Fearmongers Think You’re Stupid
Binoy Kampmark
Mealy-Mouthed Universities: Academic Freedom and the Pavlou Problem Down Under
Mike Garrity
Emperor Trump Loses Again in the Northern Rockies in Big Win for Bull Trout, Rivers and the ESA
Alex Lawson
34 Attorneys General Call to Bust Gilead’s Pharma Monopoly on COVID Treatment Remdesivir
August 10, 2020
Gerald Sussman
Biden’s Ukrainegate Problem
Vijay Prashad – Érika Ortega Sanoja
How the U.S. Failed at Its Foreign Policy Toward Venezuela
Daniel Warner
Geneva: The Home of Lost Causes
Mike Hastie
The Police Force Stampede in Portland on August 8, 2020 
Jack Rasmus
Trump’s Executive Orders: EOs as PR and FUs
Rev. William Alberts
Cognitive Without Conscience
David Altheide
Politicizing Fear Through the News Media
F. Douglas Stephenson
Is Big Pharma More Interested in Profiteering Than Protecting Us From Coronavirus?
Evaggelos Vallianatos
The Money Plague
Howard Lisnoff
Revolutionaries Living in a System of Growing Fascism
Ralph Nader
Donald Trump is Defeating Himself
Lynnette Grey Bull
The Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women Human Rights Emergency is Not a Photo-Op for Ivanka Trump
Victor Grossman
Some Come, Others Go
Binoy Kampmark
Death From the Sky: Hiroshima and Normalised Atrocities
The Stop Golden Rice Network
Why We Oppose Golden Rice
Michael D. Knox
After Nagasaki, the U.S. Did Not Choose Peace
Elliot Sperber
A Tomos 
Weekend Edition
August 07, 2020
Friday - Sunday
John Davis
The COVID Interregnum
Louis Yako
20 Postcard Notes From Iraq: With Love in the Age of COVID-19
Patrick Cockburn
War and Pandemic Journalism: the Truth Can Disappear Fast
Eve Ottenberg
Fixing the COVID Numbers
Jeffrey St. Clair
Roaming Charges: Every Which Way to Lose
Paul Street
Trump is Not Conceding: This is Happening Here
Robert Hunziker
The World on Fire
Rob Urie
Neoliberal Centrists and the American Left
John Laforge
USAF Vet Could Face ‘20 Days for 20 Bombs’ for Protest Against US H-Bombs Stationed in Germany
Andrew Levine
Clyburn’s Complaint
FacebookTwitterRedditEmail