Exclusively in the new print issue of CounterPunch
SHOCK AND AWE OVER GAZA — Jonathan Cook reports from the West Bank on How the Media and Human Rights Groups Cover for Israel’s War Crimes; Jeffrey St. Clair on Why Israel is Losing; Nick Alexandrov on Honduras Five Years After the Coup; Joshua Frank on California’s Water Crisis; Ismael Hossein-Zadeh on Finance Capital and Inequality; Kathy Deacon on The Center for the Whole Person; Kim Nicolini on the Aesthetics of Jim Jarmusch. PLUS: Mike Whitney on the Faltering Economic Recovery; Chris Floyd on Being Trapped in a Mad World; and Kristin Kolb on Cancer Without Melodrama.
Archives by Tag 'poverty'
Child Trafficking and Adoption in Haiti
JULIAN VIGO
UNICEF estimates that approximately 300,000 Haitian children are restavèk (child slaves) and that 3,000 children are trafficked out of Haiti each year.  However, these figures are widely considered conservative both because there are no serious studies to date on this s...
How the Other Half Still Lives
CHARLES R. LARSON
Some of us can remember reading Michael Harrington’s ground-breaking study of poverty in the United States: The Other America (1962).  Sadly, Sasha Abramsky’s ...
Kids Have No Seat at This Table
FRANKLIN STRIER
“It must not for a moment be forgotten that the core of any social plan must be the child.” -President Franklin Roosevelt, 1934. “There are three things I like about Italian ships. First, ...
The Real Economic Parasites
KEVIN CARSON
Everywhere you look in the right-wing commentariat, you see the recurring theme of the “underclass” as parasites. Its most recent appearance was the meme of the productive, tax-paying 53% vs. the tax-consuming 47%. And of course there’s the perennial favorite mythic...
Homeless Industries in San Francisco
BINOY KAMPMARK
It is a condition that the United States has given a particular meaning to.  From being the light on the hill for liberty, the American vision has become a case of survival on the streets.  Homeownership, even renting, is a privilege.  Welfare is set for the chop.  Fo...
Rural Definitions: You’re O-U-T!
CAROL MILLER
The squabble over how to define rural diverts us from the real problem: Support for vital rural development programs has been decimated. Maybe it’s time for a new take on an old idea. The emerging fight in Washington over how to define “rural” for some federa...
Global Rescue Plan
DAVID SWANSON
When the wealthy nations of the world meet as the G8 or in any other gathering, it’s interesting to imagine what they would do if they followed the golden rule, valued grandchildren, disliked unnecessary suffering, or wished to outgrow ancient forms of barbarism, or...
Homeless Plan Has Good Ideas (And Scary Ones)
TOM & JUDY TURNIPSEED
Homelessness is finally catching the attention of the media, everyday people and even politicians in the Midlands of South Carolina. We’ve heard much about compassion, humanity, respect and some sensible approaches to ending homelessness. A community approach t...
Radical Remaking of the Economy is Taking Root
KEVIN ZEESE and MARGARET FLOWERS
It is time for the economy to work for the people, not the elites; it is time for economic democracy. As the school year ends, college students are coming home to a paucity of summer jobs and young adults are graduating into an economy with ...
A Dispatch From The Toughest Slums on Earth
ANDRE VLTCHEK
Nairobi They tell you ‘peace’, but you know you are living in a warzone. You know it from the start; you’ve sensed it ever since you were a very little boy or a girl. You wake up ev...
The National Mantlepiece
NORMAN POLLACK
Picture with me a vast luxurious hunting lodge, high-ceilinged, massive oak beams, bear and other trophy rugs, an inner sanctum of America’s ruling groups, formally known as “Interpenetration,” but more affectionately, to its members, “Co-Partnership,” to signif...
Farm Suicides Soar
P. SAINATH
Suicide rates among Indian farmers were a chilling 47 per cent higher than they were for the rest of the population in 2011. In some of the States worst hit by the agrarian crisis, they were well over 100 per cent higher. The new Census 2011 data reveal a shrinking farmer...
Dr. Kyenge’s Crusade
FREDERICK B. HUDSON
In 1933, the writer Arna Bontemps, a fellow member with Langston Hughes of a collection of writers, artists, and musicians that history has dubbed “the Harlem Renaissance,” in recognition of the creative contributions they offered to the world, penned a moving...
Recurring Nightmares?
KEVIN ZEESE AND MARGARET FLOWERS
The weekly news is like a recurring bad dream that is becoming an even worse nightmare. While the investor class cheers a rising stock market, the rest of us sink. The headline that jumped out at us this week came from Bloomberg News, ...
The Elusive Minimum Wage
DAVID MACARAY
If you happen to follow the American and international labor scene, and want to kill a leisurely hour, an entertaining way of doing that is to visit the Department of Labor’s (DOL) official website.  It offers a wide selection of labor tidbits, explanations of bureaucr...
The Poorer Nations
LUIS NIEVES
If global resistance is not on the horizon that does not mean that struggle must turn inwards.  Precisely the opposite is necessary, which is to say that national and regional struggles must be alert to the ideological importanc...
Destroying Detroit In Order To “Save” It
TOM STEPHENS
“We use data, analysis, advocacy and community organizing to protect and increase participation in the democratic process and to demand that state and local decision makers consider race and economic justice in their planning, funding and policymaking de...
Military Spending vs. People’s Health
Dr. CESAR CHELALA
The latest report by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) shows that, considering some data uncertainties, the world military spending in 2012 dropped slightly (0.5 percent) when compared to 2011. It is the first decline in military spending since ...
On the Streets of Oakland
LINH DINH
Other people’s lives come fluttering to us in the tiniest fragments, and these we gather, when we bother to, into an incoherent jumble of impressions we pass off as knowledge. Further, our ears, eyes and mind are all seriously defective and worn-down, making intelligenc...
Los Angeles at Ground Zero
LINH DINH
Sightseeing buses are for those who deeply dread the places they’re visiting. You can’t really see a city or town from a motorized anything, so if you claim to have driven through Los Angeles, for example, you haven’t seen it. The speed and protection of a car preve...
Life is Cheap in Karachi
ASHRAF KHAN
Karachi, Pakistan. Laiq Hussain, a member of the radical Sunni group Ahle Sunnat Wal Jamaat, was riding his motorbike down a busy street in central Karachi, with a friend on the pillion, when they were ambushed. A bullet hit Hussain in the right temple: ...
Tyranny Of The Reasonable
PHIL ROCKSTROH
“The best people possess a feeling for beauty, the courage to take risks, the discipline to tell the truth, the capacity for sacrifice. Ironically, their virtues make them vulnerable; they are often wounded, sometimes destroyed.” — Ernest Hemingway ...
A Woman of Courage in a Ravaged Land
Dr. CESAR CHELALA
Somalia can be considered one of the most troublesome countries in the world, one frequently called a “failed state,” ravaged by violence and instability. But in such unfavorable place a valiant woman has quietly emerged as a presence of dignity and hope. Dr. Hawa Abd...
The Causes of Global Inequality
RAJESH MAKWANA
As international negotiations on a new set of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) continue, it is worth reflecting on some of the limitations and failures of the MDG framework. Significantly, the program represents the only internationally agreed framework for trying to a...