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THE WHITE TERRORISTS — Yvette Carnell writes a scathing history of Lynching in America; Ajamu Baraka on Netanyahu the Rejectionist; Patrick Smith on Reinventing the Foreign Correspondent; Peter Lee on the escalating cyberwar between the US and China; Jeffrey St. Clair on the Real Israeli Defense Force: the US Congress. Plus: Mike Whitney: Getting Cured in Vietnam; JoAnn Wypijewski on Gramsci, Chick Webb and the Art of Living Well; Chris Floyd: Learning About the Rapture from Michele Bachmann and Lee Ballinger: Driving Nat King Cole.
Archives by Tag 'labor'
It’s Still Class Warfare
DAVID MACARAY
It’s an old joke, but it bears repeating: An Oxford professor meets a former student on the street. He asks what he’s been up to lately. The student tells him he’s working on a doctoral thesis about the survival of the class system in the United States. The professo...
Viva Mexico! Vivan Los Maestros!
PAUL IMISON
Mexico City While President Enrique Peña Nieto gave the annual Viva Mexico! from the National Palace Sunday night, alternative “cries of independence” rang out around the country, not least at the capital’s Revolution Monument where striking public ...
Labor’s Days in La La Land
STEVE EARLY
As AFL-CIO leaders packed up to leave Los Angeles last Wednesday, they basked in the glow of favorable media coverage of their five-day convention. The meeting concluded, per usual, with fulsome delegate praise for President Rich Trumka’s carefully scripted chairing and...
The Economy, Labour and the 2015 Canadian Election
MURRAY DOBBIN
With the formation Unifor, a “new kind of union” and the country’s largest private sector union, there is at least a chance that the long slumber of the labour movement is over. An organization that big, with a radically new mandate, cannot help but influence develo...
The Fed, QE, and Jobs
JACK RASMUS
Over the past five years the US central bank, the Federal Reserve (Fed), has printed nearly $4 trillion in liquidity (money) which it has provided to banks and professional investors. This is called ‘Quantitative Easing’ (QE). QE means the Fed essentially prints money...
As The Curtain Rises in LA
STEVE EARLY
Los Angeles I’ve only been to two national AFL-CIO conventions in forty years of union activity. The one four years ago was pretty dreary—setting a low bar for improvements this year. In 2009, the California Nurses Association  (CNA) and several othe...
Mexican Teachers Hit the Streets
PAUL IMISON
The first nine months of the Enrique Peña Nieto administration have been a cleverly-orchestrated exercise in media manipulation. But you can’t really ignore 20,000 pissed-off teachers dragging monstrous Mexico City to a halt. As the Institutional Revolutionary Party (P...
25 Years of Jobs with Justice
MARK VORPAHL
It’s no secret that the last 30 years have seen a brutal corporate assault on U.S. workers. Incomes and union membership rates have plummeted, unemployment is soaring, and the two corporate parties have joined forces to go after our previously untouchable historic gains...
Labor Day Is a Time to Mobilize
RALPH NADER
For far too many Americans, Labor Day is simply another day off, another store sale and another small parade. The meaning of the holiday has been dulled by both rampant commercialism and public apathy. Where is the passion for elevating the wellbeing of American workers? ...
Autoworkers Under the Gun
ANDY PIASCIK
The sit-down strike by General Motors workers in the winter of 1936-37 was one of the galvanizing events in U.S. labor history. Similarly, the efforts of the primarily African-American autoworkers of the Dodge Revolutionary Union Movement and the other RUM’s sparked...
What Contingent Faculty Can Learn From Fast-Food Workers
BRIAN HAMAN
It has become a truism in American higher education: seventy-five percent of undergraduate courses at U.S. colleges and universities are taught by contingent faculty1, most of whom lack health insurance,...
A Remembrance for Labor Day
DAVID MACARAY
Because of our fascination with glamour and money, mundane events that happen in Hollywood seem way more exciting than mundane events that happen elsewhere. This goes for everything from Hollywood courtships, to Hollywood marriages and divorces, to Hollywood babies, to Ho...
Freedom From Jobs
ELLIOT SPERBER
As the 50th anniversary of the 1963 march on Washington DC – the March for Jobs and Freedom immortalized by Martin Luther King’s iconic I Have a Dream speech – is celebrated and discussed around the country, it is important to note that though some gains...
A “New Idea” From 1980s
STEVE EARLY
In the run-up to their convention next month in Los Angeles, top AFL-CIO officials have welcomed closer ties with non-labor groups and associations of workers’ who lack bargaining rights. In an interview with USA Today this summer, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka claim...
Finally, Some Good News for Organized Labor
DAVID MACARAY
A couple of good things happened on the labor front recently.  Granted, thirty-five years ago, neither of these events would have merited more than a casual footnote, let alone be considered “good.”  But that was back in 1978, when there was still hope.  Considerin...
The End of the Newspaper Worker
DAVID MACARAY
With a daily circulation of approximately 17,000, the solidly right-wing Antelope Valley Press has proudly served the Palmdale, high desert area (about 60 miles northeast of Los Angeles) since its founding, way back in 1915. The AVP is the largest selling daily new...
Teamsters Make a Run at the Transport Workers
DAVID MACARAY
There are two ways to look at a so-called “raid” of one union by another. We can see it as treachery, as an unwarranted assault, as a selfish attempt to undermine already fragile working class “solidarity” in return for increased revenue or power, or we can see it...
50 Shades of Union Dignity
DAVID MACARAY
Besides superior wages and benefits, one of the advantages of belonging to a union is that you can perform your job with dignity. Under a union contract, the boss can’t harass you, he can’t arbitrarily mess with your hours, and he can’t alter your pay. After fightin...
Labor Takes a Stand
JACK GERSON
Two years ago, Wisconsin public workers and services were under assault. Hundreds of thousands of workers converged on the state capital, Madison, to fight austerity cuts proposed by Gov. Scott Walker. The International Longshore and Warehouse Union Local 10 shutdown Bay ...
The Fight for Control at UPS
CAL WINSLOW
It is forty years ago, in November, since striking United Parcel (UPS) workers, roving pickets, crossed from Pennsylvania into Ohio, closing UPS hubs as they went, including the company’s big Northern Ohio center, Cleveland. It was an extraordinary episode, thinking bac...
The BART Strike and Mainstream Media
DAVID MACARAY
On July 1, the unionized employees of BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) went out on what became a four and a half day strike. Despite the melodramatic tone of the media—practically depicting these transit workers as a group of ungrateful renegades—it was the first shutdow...
Spontis, Squats and West Germany
RON JACOBS
My latest novel is situated in Frankfurt am Main in what was then West Germany (or the Bundesrepubl...
Labor’s “Southern Strategy”
DAVID MACARAY
Not counting all the other bad things that have happened recently (e.g., Wisconsin public workers denied collective bargaining, Michigan becoming a right-to-work state, Obama’s NLRB appointees hanging in limbo, the Democrats’ betrayal of EFCA legislation, etc.), two a...
What About Some Patriotism for America?
RALPH NADER
The 4th of July is synonymous with patriotism. Tomorrow, all over the country, Americans will congregate to spend time with family and friends, barbecue, watch fireworks, and celebrate our nation’s independence. Many will recite the pledge of allegiance or sing the ...
Our Sad, Misunderstood Labor Unions
DAVID MACARAY
“Socialism never took root in America because the poor see themselves not as the exploited proletariat, but as temporarily embarrassed millionaires.”—John Steinbeck A union official I correspond with (the International Vice...
The Disease of Caretaker Governments
BINOY KAMPMARK
A tear should be shed, though keep in the singular.  Australia’s first female Prime Minister Julia Gillard and probably last for some time, is no more.  Elected by unelected officials, she was knifed by the same individuals who encouraged the knifing of her rival, the...
Detroit’s Retired City Workers in the Crosshairs
ANN ROBERTSON & BILL LEUMER
With Detroit’s finances looking increasingly dire, the city’s creditors are beginning to face off with one another, each trying to minimize their losses. The city’s pension fund, which supports retired city workers, has found itself in direct conflict with a formida...
Obama: Sweat the Small Stuff for Big Justice
RALPH NADER
The imaginative uses of the mighty presidency in American history and its bully pulpit have rarely been much above amateurish when it comes to helping people empower themselves. This has been the case even when the same party controls the White House and both Houses of Co...
Sweat Shops, Then and Now
DAVID MACARAY
Despite his support for some policies and programs that organized labor has strongly opposed (NAFTA anyone?),  I’ve always been a fan of Robert Reich, President Clinton’s first-term Secretary of Labor.  Even when disagreeing with him, I’ve always found his thinkin...
Capitalism and Economic Imperialism
ROB URIE
With ‘recovery’ the dominant economic theme in the capitalist media the unqualified inference is we all benefit. Left out is the fundamental tension of capitalism—profits care not whether they derive from zero-sum transfers or from shared growth. Unless social power...
An Open Letter to the Evergreen State College and Beyond!
PETER BOHMER
I urge everyone to honor the Tuesday, May 28th 2013 strike of the Student Staff Support Services Union.  These Evergreen workers have bargained for more than 16 months for a just contract, where they would be treated with respect. They are requesting a small i...
Dirty Secrets in the Kitchen
MARC PERRENOUD
Most of the many television cookery programmes in the past decade, such as the UK’s MasterChef, the US’s Top Chef and Australia’s The Chopping Block have used the talent show (X Factor,Fame Academy or The Apprentice) format...
Colombia’s Peasants and Workers Under Fire
JAMES JORDAN
There has been an alarming escalation of repression against rural populations in Colombia.  Much of this is focused against the National Unified Federation of Agricultural Workers Unions, or Fensuagro–the country’s largest labor organization representing rura...
Bill Maher’s Union-Bashing
DAVID MACARAY
What person smokes a ton of marijuana, loves animals but doesn’t like kids, digs girls and sex but never wants to get married, rejoices in using dirty words, hates fat people, likes the beach, and enjoys shocking us with wisecracks about religion and hillbillies?  It...
A New Era for Labor?
LAURA FLANDERS
What a difference five years make! In 2008, when a few hundred union workers at the Republic Windows and Doors factory in Chicago voted to occupy their plant instead of submitting meekly to being laid off, theirs was a rare act of courage in a cold winter of crisis for o...
Recurring Nightmares?
KEVIN ZEESE AND MARGARET FLOWERS
The weekly news is like a recurring bad dream that is becoming an even worse nightmare. While the investor class cheers a rising stock market, the rest of us sink. The headline that jumped out at us this week came from Bloomberg News, ...
The Elusive Minimum Wage
DAVID MACARAY
If you happen to follow the American and international labor scene, and want to kill a leisurely hour, an entertaining way of doing that is to visit the Department of Labor’s (DOL) official website.  It offers a wide selection of labor tidbits, explanations of bureaucr...
Big Labor’s Tool of Empire
ALBERTO C. RUIZ
Just before the April 14 Presidential elections in Venezuela, RT News reported on a Wikileaks Cable from 2006 in which, in the words of RT, then “ambassador to Venezuela, William Brownfield, outlines a comprehensive plan to infiltrate and destabilize former President Hu...
A Deadly Price for Our Clothing
WILLIAM NICHOLAS GOMES
The deadly collapse of a building in Bangladesh late last month made news around the world and brought the...
When You’re Stupid, You’re Stupid
RODOLFO ACUÑA
My mother use to say, “Cuando eres pendejo, eres pendejo;” and there was not much you could do about it – you were just born that way. Although I always enjoy my mother’s sayings, I do not believe that stupidity is genetic. With Americans I would blame th...
The Battle of the Hong Kong Dockworkers
STEPHEN PHILION
The battle of the Hong Kong dockers, as union Secretary Wong Yu Loy reveals, was important not only because of the rarity of strikes in Hong Kong, or because it was a pitched battle with Hong Kong’s wealthiest corporate magnate, but also because of the way corporate glo...
Liberalism vs. Radicalism
ERIC PATTON
What’s the difference between liberalism and radicalism? Which is “better?” How is “better” determined? Liberalism is the belief that the king has the right to rule and that when we want him to make decisions different from those he is currently making, w...
The Pain of Bangladesh
RAMZY BAROUD
As they spoke to a BBC correspondent in their run-down room which they call home in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a man sobbed as his 12-year-old daughter sat close to him. His face, wrinkled before its time, was a picture of utter anguish. It could only be understood by a pa...
Ohio’s Corporate Junta Takes a Hit From the Labor Left
BOB FITRAKIS AND HARVEY WASSERMAN
Swing state Ohio mocks the very idea of democracy. As it so often does, Ohio reflects a national trend: this one the plunge toward corporate one-party state governments very much at odds with what the public thinks and wants. But even an apparently absolute moneyed...
Local Fights Against Austerity are Growing
MARK VORPAHL
Between sequestration, with its damaging impact on workers and the economy, and the billions of dollars in cuts to Social Security, Medicare and other necessary social programs that President Obama is pushing, it is evident that the economic policies of both major parties...
SEIU Wins Again at Kaiser
STEVE EARLY
Thirty-one months ago, when the Service Employees International Union first defeated the National Union of Healthcare Workers in a unit of 45,000 service and technical workers at Kaiser Permanente in California, SEIU leader Dave Regan proclaimed that “NUHW is now, for a...
Financial Institutions Admit Austerity Failed
KEN KLIPPENSTEIN
The first part of 2013 has been something of a confessional period for the economic managerial class. The IMF’s chief economist, Olivier Blanchard, ...
What’s the Matter With That Union Boss?
YVES ENGLER
“I am not here to take marching orders from union bosses,” said Mr. Poilievre. “I represent taxpayers and frankly taxpayers expect us to keep costs under control so that we can keep taxes down. It is for those taxpayers that we work. Not union ...
Istanbul’s Shameful May Day
MICHAEL DICKINSON
I was walking through the streets of Istanbul. Smoke and tear-gas bombs were exploding everywhere and people were running, pursued by police in riot gear. At a street corner I came across a street vendor selling Turkish sweets and stopped to speak to him. Finding it diffi...
May Day and the Failure of the Immigrant Rights Movement
AJAMU BARAKA
How did a movement that put millions on the streets in 2006 allow the development of something called the “comprehensive immigration reform act,” now being debated in U.S. Congress, which expands the guest worker program, devotes millions to border and immigration enf...